The Liberation Pack

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Mycology – The scientific study of fungi. The first time I went looking for mushrooms with my boy Jordan (RIP) was quite magical. Blue Wylies were the type he would forage north Georgia. We pulled up to a spot behind a playground with a small area filled with trees that separated the park from the horse stable. He warned me to be in and out cause this spot was hot but he also brought a spliff to burn while we was there. Jordan had that type of logic. 5 minutes of looking around we saw nothing he told me to spark the spliff , I lit it and 5 seconds later it seemed like mushrooms all of sudden started appearing. We left with 2 grocery bags filled of fresh dark blue Wiley mushrooms. I was 16 at the time and thought we could always find them wild but that wasn’t the case. This forced me to learn how to grow mushrooms myself and I still wish I had a sample of blue wileys to clone. I’ll always appreciate him for putting me on. This is the Liberation Pack from @myco_dogon_west 3 Agar Plates 1 Genetics Plate 1 Spore print 1 Art piece / Giveaway Entry If your interested in growing and studying this is a good place to begin. Plus it’s an affordable hobby/ field of learning. #mycology #cubensis #growmushrooms #mushrooms #psilocybinmushrooms #psilocybe

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Contact Myco_Dogon_West For more Information on how to get a Liberation Pack

Why We Do Yoga 2

In this chapter of Why we do Yoga, I travel to a few new places to find out the reasons and ways people do yoga. Familiar faces and new encounters lead me through a slew of changes plans but graceful adjustments. Watch as one connection leads to another from Martinique all the way back to Atlanta and a few places in between. Luck and coincidence carried me through this one. Look forward to the next soon enough. Peace 

The list of Yogis keeps growing but you can find most of the people seen in this one on Instagram

@EyeFocus
@SlyviaDESROSES Yogi / Translator 
@TheMartinicianWayOfLife
@PintsizeNurse Yogi
@NakeeshaSmith Yogi 
@MaatPetrova Fitness Wellness Coach 
@Allthingscoyia Yogi Mommy
@ReignGlobal Artist 
@HadiiyaBarbel Lifestyle Empowerment
@Theiridescentgoddess Yogi 
@LittleMsDaisha Yogi 
@Yirser Yogi 
@Quoom Drummer
@Doomzday_1 Drummer 
@Raine.Supreme Yogi 
@BluetreasurePhotography Yogi / Photo
@Yoga_Bay Yogi 
@KindredSpiritCR Equine Therapist / Yogi
Corrine Aulakh Equine Therapist / Yogi
@MovingArtExperience
@TheOmBrunch
@LifeisArt_Films Yogi 

@Aminabina
@By_Elr Yogi
@IamReneeWatkins Yogi  
@YogaPlayground Yogi 
@Dade2Shelby Yogi 
@Bri.Simpson Artist 
Cristian Taxi Costa Rica 

Let me know what you think

Why Do You Do Yoga? Documentary

The Inspiration for this capture was the perspective I gained of yoga before I actually practiced. The image of the people doing yoga in the magazines and documentary films were not the people I saw doing yoga on a daily basis. I simply set out to record the experiences of people I know that practiced yoga.  The all star line up includes Yirser Ra Hotep, PintsizeNurse, Superdopemin, Bendi.Locs (Ifcukgirls), Ona Hawk, Lisa Ralston, Marisol, Sara Clark, Sacred Brooklyn Yoga studio plus more! Check it out and let us know what you think.

 

Buy Cubensis T Shirts

Introducing the cube. We are working on a project titled Introducing the cube. This will be a documentary exploring the idea of simply introducing people to the Cubensis mushroom and documenting their experience. There has been a mis-perception built around the “magic” mushrooms. We will be focused on showing show that this particular mushroom is not dangerous and can teach you much more than you will ever know.

Look forward to How to Grow workshops, Yoga and meditation sessions based around Cubensis. Each T-shirt purchase helps us funds the goals we have set to see this vision become a reality! Thank you, Support the project & Grab a Spore Print T Shirt Below

     

 

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Growing elderberry

Growing elderberry trees is surprisingly easy. Elderberries and elderflowers make delicious foods and beverages, plus research shows they’re a helpful immune-boosting medicine to fight colds, flus, and other viruses. Here’s a complete guide to growing and harvesting your own elderberries and elderflowers!


Elderberry, aka Sambucus, is a small, deciduous tree that grows in virtually every temperate region on earth. There are dozens of different species of Sambucus around the world. Some species feature red berries, some blue, some black/purple.

A beautiful 5-gallon bucket full of perfectly ripe elderberries from Tyrant Farms. Growing elderberry trees by Tyrant Farms

A beautiful 5-gallon bucket full of perfectly ripe elderberries from Tyrant Farms.

In this article, we’ll be focusing on how to grow one particular species of elderberry: Sambucas canadensis, aka “American black elderberry”.

Native range of North American Sambucus nigra subspecies. Image courtesy Elbert L. Little, Jr., of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service.

Native ranges of various elderberry species in North America, which grow from Ag Zone 5-8. Sambucus canadensis range shown in green. Image courtesy Elbert L. Little, Jr., of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service.

Sambucus canadensis plants feature dark purple-black berries and produce excellent quality fruit. They also have extraordinarily high concentrations of health-boosting compounds such as anthocyanin (which gives the berries their purple/black color).

We grow Sambucus canadensis varieties, and recommend you do as well — if you live in the ranges on the map above where they grow natively. Otherwise, seek out varieties specific to your growing region.

For easier reading, we’ll simply refer to Sambucus canadensis as “elderberries” for the remainder of this article.

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Growing elderberry trees in an edible urban landscape works perfectly. The two large plants at the very back of our edible landscape are elderberry trees that have just gone from flowering to fruit set in early summer.

Growing elderberry trees in an edible urban landscape works perfectly. The two large plants at the very back of our edible landscape are elderberry trees that are starting to flower. The white flowering plant in front is yarrow, not elderberries.

Where does the name elderberry come from?

The name “elderberry” comes from the Anglo Saxon word “æld,” which sounds like “old” but actually translates to “fire.” Centuries ago, the hollow, straight stems of elderberry branches were used to blow air into a hot fireplace, fueling the flame.

Given that the center of a cut and dried elderberry branch has a light styrofoam-like texture that would make an ideal fire-starting material, our bet is this feature also factored into the plant’s old Anglo Saxon name as well.

GROWING ELDERBERRY TREES: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE

Read the full article at TyrantFarms

Montreux Jazz Festival Release More Than 50 Full Sets of Performances

During this unprecedented time, fans will have the chance to experience iconic performances by some of their favourite artists from their living rooms,” reads a press statement via NME, “including rare concerts from ‘The Godfather of Soul’ James Brown, who played Montreux Jazz Festival in 1981 and the legendary Nina Simone in 1976. Fans will also be able to enjoy Johnny Cash’s 1994 Live at Montreux performance, as well as the ground-breaking hip hop group RUN DMC’s electrifying show in 2001.”

“We hope that a little music and soul will brighten up your day!” the organizers continue.

Other released festival sets include Ray Charles, Nile Rodgers & Chic, and Phil Collins, as well as Wu-Tang Clan, Simply Red, Carlos Santana, and Deep Purple.

To access this treasure trove of concert videos, head to the Montreux Jazz’s official website. The festival, which is now in its 54th year, will communicate a new date for the 2020 lineup announcement soon.

In related news, Radiohead recently shared their full set from 2017’s Best Kept Secret Festival.

Read the full article at consequence of sound

What are Anti Nutrients?

Are anti-nutrients harmful?

broccoli growing in the ground

The takeaway: The pros and cons of anti-nutrients on long-term human health is an area of active research. Though certain foods may contain residual amounts of anti-nutrients after processing and cooking, the health benefits of eating these foods outweigh any potential negative nutritional effects. Eating a variety of nutritious foods daily and avoiding eating large amounts of a single food at one meal can help to offset minor losses in nutrient absorption caused by anti-nutrients.

The term “anti-nutrients” suggests what they are. Whereas nutrients are substances that nourish plants and animals to grow and live, anti-nutrients earn their title because they can block the absorption of nutrients. Anti-nutrients are naturally found in animals and many plant-based foods. In plants, they are compounds designed to protect from bacterial infections and being eaten by insects. [1]

There are several compounds in the foods we eat classified as anti-nutrients. Examples include:

  • Glucosinolates in cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage)—can prevent the absorption of iodine, which may then interfere with thyroid function and cause goiter. Those already with an iodine deficiency or a condition called hypothyroidism are most susceptible.
  • Lectins in legumes (beans, peanuts, soybeans), whole grains—can interfere with the absorption of calcium, iron, phosphorus, and zinc.
  • Oxalates in green leafy vegetables, tea—can bind to calcium and prevent it from being absorbed.
  • Phytates (phytic acid) in whole grains, seeds, legumes, some nuts—can decrease the absorption of ironzincmagnesium, and calcium. [2,3]
  • Saponins in legumes, whole grains—can interfere with normal nutrient absorption.
  • Tannins in tea, coffee, legumes—can decrease iron absorption.

It is not known how much nutrient loss occurs in our diets because of anti-nutrients, and the effects vary among individuals based on their metabolism and how the food is cooked and prepared. Many anti-nutrients like phytates, lectins, and glucosinolates can be removed or deactivated by soaking, sprouting, or boiling the food before eating.

Another consideration is that these anti-nutrients affect the absorption of nutrients eaten at the same meal. Therefore to lower this risk, it is recommended to avoid eating large quantities of foods containing anti-nutrients at one meal, and to eat a balanced diet throughout the day with a variety of foods. [3] For example, instead of eating two cups of bran cereal with milk for breakfast, choose one cup of cereal with milk and one cup of fresh berries.

People who are at high risk for diseases related to mineral deficiencies, such as osteoporosis with calcium deficiency or anemia with iron deficiency, may wish to monitor their food choices for anti-nutrient content. Another strategy could be to alter the timing of eating foods with anti-nutrients. Examples are to drink tea between meals instead of with a meal to reduce the chances of iron being poorly absorbed, or taking a calcium supplement a few hours after eating a high-fiber wheat bran cereal that contains phytates.

Studies on vegetarians who eat diets high in plant foods containing anti-nutrients do not generally show deficiencies in iron and zinc, so the body may be adapting to the presence of anti-nutrients by increasing the absorption of these minerals in the gut. [3]

Keep in mind that anti-nutrients may also exert health benefits. Phytates, for example, have been found to lower cholesterol, slow digestion, and prevent sharp rises in blood sugar. [2] Many anti-nutrients have antioxidant and anticancer actions, so avoiding them entirely is not recommended. [3,4]

Keeping an eye on glucosinolates

A few studies have found a small but significant increased risk of disease with higher intakes of glucosinolates, which are obtained mainly through cruciferous vegetables. In two studies following three large prospective cohorts of 42,170 male and 168,404 female health professionals for several years, a higher intake of glucosinolates was associated with a slightly higher risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes in men and women. Individuals with the highest intakes of glucosinolates had a 19% increased risk of type 2 diabetes compared with those with the lowest intakes, even after adjusting for other factors that can affect diabetes, such as BMI, physical activity, and smoking. [5] The strongest associations were observed for Brussels sprouts when comparing the highest (1 or more servings/week) and lowest intakes (never or almost never). In a separate analysis of these same three cohorts looking at intakes of glucosinolates and heart disease, participants who consumed one or more servings a week of Brussels sprouts and cabbage had a higher heart disease risk than those who consumed these vegetables less than once per month. [6] The authors did not recommend avoiding these foods but rather emphasized a need for more studies to replicate and confirm these findings to better understand this possible relation, as several other studies have shown a protective effect on diabetes and heart disease with higher intakes of cruciferous vegetables.

Book Select – The Laws of Human Nature

Robert Greene is a master guide for millions of readers, distilling ancient wisdom and philosophy into essential texts for seekers of power, understanding and mastery. Now he turns to the most important subject of all – understanding people’s drives and motivations, even when they are unconscious of them themselves.

We are social animals. Our very lives depend on our relationships with people. Knowing why people do what they do is the most important tool we can possess, without which our other talents can only take us so far. Drawing from the ideas and examples of Pericles, Queen Elizabeth I, Martin Luther King Jr, and many others, Greene teaches us how to detach ourselves from our own emotions and master self-control, how to develop the empathy that leads to insight, how to look behind people’s masks, and how to resist conformity to develop your singular sense of purpose. Whether at work, in relationships, or in shaping the world around you, The Laws of Human Nature offers brilliant tactics for success, self-improvement, and self-defense.

You can purchase the book on amazon or read the PDF here

Daily Focus 079

Ah ah ah ah staying alive, staying alive. That has been the theme song for this week. Many people have been thrown into a whirlwind of chaos concerning employment I give my tips on finding new hustles and utilizing the resources you do have at hand. Last night a DJ saved my life has never took on more meaning lately. Big ups to 9th Wonder (Classic hiphop), Just Blaze (being himself) , Questlove (Lover Rock) , Erykah Badu, Kid Capri and D-nice they all been keeping my instagram very entertaining and enjoyable. Big Ups to the online trainers giving me that extra battery pack in Train or Die Compound on Facebook and Instagram. Quick random story about 2 brothers on the train and we discuss how to maneuver smart when the law isn’t quite up to date with what you choose to do to make a living.  Stay healthy eat your vegetables and fruit, learn more about your body with the newly allocated time.

Quotes Of The Day 

The universe can be unpredictably poetic

A week of thirst led to an ocean of discovery

 

TAOISM | How to Get Drunk on Life

Instead of escaping the experience of life, in all its rawness, with all its emotional highs and lows, its joys and hardships, can’t we just enjoy life as it comes, soberly, as much as we enjoy the state of drunkenness? Or simply put: how can we get drunk on life? Original Taoist tale: https://youtu.be/-o_KD9A2pAQ (great channel) Cuts, voice, footage, script by Einzelgänger. I used creative commons (links below) and some material from Storyblocks and Pixabay (links available upon request).

PURCHASE MY BOOK (affiliate links): Ebook: https://amzn.to/35e23a5 Paperback: https://amzn.to/2RJYfti Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/einzelga…

Merchandise design by Punksthetic Art: https://www.youtube.com/user/JRStoneart

Music is licensed and paid for. Creative commons: Samsara: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi… Lao Tzu: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laozi#/… Kierkegaard: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi… Marcus Aurelius: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcus_… #taoism #sobriety #livelifetothefullest

Vitamins, Cofactors and Coenzymes

Nonprotein components of certain enzymes are called cofactors. If the cofactor is organic, then it is called a coenzyme. Coenzymes are relatively small molecules compared to the protein part of the enzyme and many of the coenzymes are derived from vitamins. The coenzymes make up a part of the active site, since without the coenzyme, the enzyme will not function.

  • Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD)
    The structure shown on the left is for FAD and is similar to NAD+ in that it contains a vitamin-riboflavin, adenine, ribose, and phosphates. As shown it is the diphosphate, but is also used as the monophosphate (FMN).
  • Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD)
    Nicotinamide is from the niacin vitamin. The NAD+ coenzyme is involved with many types of oxidation reactions where alcohols are converted to ketones or aldehydes. It is also involved in the first enzyme complex 1 of the electron transport chain.
  • Vitamin A: β-Carotene
    β-carotene is the molecule that gives carrots, sweet potatoes, squash, and other yellow or orange vegetables their orange color. It is part of a family of chemicals called the carotenoids, which are found in many fruit and vegetables, as well as some animal products such as egg yolks. Carotenoids were first isolated in the early 19th century, and have been synthesized for use as food colorings since the 1950s.
  • Vitamin B₁₂: Cobalamin
    Cobalamin, or Vitamin B12, is the largest and the most complex out of all the types of Vitamins. The discovery of Cobalamin was made as scientists were seeking to find a cure for pernicious anemia, an anemic disease caused by an absence of intrinsic factor in the stomach.

    Go to for Chem.Libretext more information

What are probiotics?

The idea that bacteria are beneficial can be tough to understand. We take antibiotics to kill harmful bacterial infections and use antibacterial soaps and lotions more than ever. The wrong bacteria in the wrong place can cause problems, but the right bacteria in the right place can have benefits. This is where probiotics come in. Probiotics are live microorganisms that may be able to help prevent and treat some illnesses. Promoting a healthy digestive tract and a healthy immune system are their most widely studied benefits at this time. These are also commonly known as friendly, good, or healthy bacteria. Probiotics can be supplied through foods, beverages, and dietary supplements.

The root of the word probiotic comes from the Greek word pro, meaning “promoting,” and biotic, meaning “life.” The discovery of probiotics came about in the early 20th century, when Elie Metchnikoff, known as the “father of probiotics,” had observed that rural dwellers in Bulgaria lived to very old ages despite extreme poverty and harsh climate. He theorized that health could be enhanced and senility delayed by manipulating the intestinal microbiome with host-friendly bacteria found in sour milk. Since then, research has continued to support his findings along with suggesting even more benefits.

Probiotics Side Effects

Probiotics’ side effects, if they occur, tend to be mild and digestive (such as gas or bloating). More serious effects have been seen in

some people. Probiotics might theoretically cause infections that need to be treated with antibiotics, especially in people with underlying health conditions. They could also cause unhealthy metabolic activities, too much stimulation of the immune system, or gene transfer (insertion of genetic material into a cell).

Illustration shows a callout of gut bacteria in the intestines.

Source: iStock

What are probiotics? (Continued)

In October 2013, the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) organized a meeting of clinical and scientific experts on probiotics (with specialties in gastroenterology, pediatrics, family medicine, gut microbiota, microbiology of probiotic bacteria, microbial genetics, immunology, and food science) to reexamine the concept of probiotics. They define probiotics as “live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host.” They also differentiated between products containing probiotics and those containing live or active cultures and established the following criteria:

  • Live or active cultures criteria:
    • Any food with fermentation microbe(s)
    • Proof of viability at a minimum level reflective of typical levels seen in fermented foods, suggested to be 1 × 109 CFU per serving
    • No specific research or evidence is needed to make this claim.
  • Probiotics criteria for products that do not make a health claim:
    • A member(s) of a safe species, which is supported by sufficient evidence of a general beneficial effect in humans or a safe microbe(s) with a property (for example, a structure, activity, or end product) for which there is sufficient evidence for a general beneficial effect in humans
    • Proof of viability at the appropriate level used in supporting human studies
  • Probiotics criteria for products that make a health claim:
    • Defined probiotic strain(s)
    • Proof of delivery of viable strain(s) at efficacious dose at the end of shelf life
    • Convincing evidence needed for specific strain(s) or strain combination in the specified health indication

Our body normally has what we would call good or helpful bacteria and bad or harmful bacteria. Maintaining the correct balance between these bacteria is necessary for optimal health. Age, genetics, and diet may influence the composition of the bacteria in the body (microbiota). An imbalance is called dysbiosis, and this has possible links to diseases of the intestinal tract, including ulcerative colitisirritable bowel syndromeceliac disease, and Crohn’s disease, as well as more systemic diseases such as obesity and type 1 and type 2 diabetes. How do you know if you need probiotics? This article will help you decide.

Illustration shows the the combination of prebiotics and probiotics forming synbiotics.

Source: MedicineNet

What are prebiotics and synbiotics?

The prebiotic comes before and helps the probiotic, and then the two can combine to have a synergistic effect, known as synbiotics. A prebiotic is actually a nondigestible carbohydrate that acts as food for the probiotics and bacteria in your gut. The definition of the effect of prebiotics is the selective stimulation of growth and/or activity(ies) of one or a limited number of microbial genus(era)/species in the gut microbiota that confer(s) health benefits to the host. The health benefits have been suggested to include acting as a remedy for gastrointestinal (GI) complications such as enteritisconstipation, and irritable bowel disease; prevention and treatment of various cancers; decreasing allergic inflammation; treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and fighting immune deficiency diseases. There has also been research showing that the dietary intake of particular food products with a prebiotic effect has been shown, especially in adolescents, but also tentatively in postmenopausal women, to increase calcium absorption as well as bone calcium accretion and bone mineral density. The benefits for obesity and type 2 diabetes are growing as recent data, both from experimental models and from human studies, have shown particular food products with prebiotics have influences on energy homeostasis, satiety regulation, and body weight gain.

Most of the prebiotics identified are oligosaccharides. They are resistant to the human digestive enzymes that work on all other carbohydrates. This means that they pass through the upper GI system without being digested. They then get fermented in the lower colon and produce short-chain fatty acids that will then nourish the beneficial microbiota that live there. Oligosaccharides can be synthesized or obtained from natural sources. These sources include asparagus, artichoke, bamboo shoots, banana, barley, chicory, leeks, garlic, honey, lentils, milk, mustards, onion, rye, soybean, sugar beet, sugarcane juice, tomato, wheat, and yacón. The health benefits from these oligosaccharides is a topic of ongoing research.

Read the full article at MedicineNet

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