Subscription Based Content Creator

Some of my clients were requesting a more feasible option to invest in content for their business, events, and products.

This option allows clients to utilize hours of video recording (vr.) time without paying for all of the hours in one large deposit.

Complimentary edit time is also included. Typically payment for edits would be required in advance but with the content creator plan the first 1 – 4 minutes of edits are free depending on the plan you choose.

Cancel at anytime, amount paid will be converted to vr hours

International & Domestic travel still an option. Travel expenses must be covered in advance.

5% Discount option for payment in full to reduce overall cost even further

5% Discount if you referral a content creator to the plan 

By choosing a plan in contrast to paying shoot to shoot  your saving a value of $50 per hour on video record time and $25 per minute on editing.

Shoot to Shoot

5 hour shoot  ($875.00) + 2 minute edit ( $250.00) = 1,125.00

Creators Plan 

5 Hour Shoot  + 2 minute edit = 100.00 monthly

( 9 Hours + 2 minutes remaining)  14 Hour Plan 

If you would like to call to discuss a plan or have any questions feel free to send me an email or call.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why We Do Yoga 2

In this chapter of Why we do Yoga, I travel to a few new places to find out the reasons and ways people do yoga. Familiar faces and new encounters lead me through a slew of changes plans but graceful adjustments. Watch as one connection leads to another from Martinique all the way back to Atlanta and a few places in between. Luck and coincidence carried me through this one. Look forward to the next soon enough. Peace 

The list of Yogis keeps growing but you can find most of the people seen in this one on Instagram

@EyeFocus
@SlyviaDESROSES Yogi / Translator 
@TheMartinicianWayOfLife
@PintsizeNurse Yogi
@NakeeshaSmith Yogi 
@MaatPetrova Fitness Wellness Coach 
@Allthingscoyia Yogi Mommy
@ReignGlobal Artist 
@HadiiyaBarbel Lifestyle Empowerment
@Theiridescentgoddess Yogi 
@LittleMsDaisha Yogi 
@Yirser Yogi 
@Quoom Drummer
@Doomzday_1 Drummer 
@Raine.Supreme Yogi 
@BluetreasurePhotography Yogi / Photo
@Yoga_Bay Yogi 
@KindredSpiritCR Equine Therapist / Yogi
Corrine Aulakh Equine Therapist / Yogi
@MovingArtExperience
@TheOmBrunch
@LifeisArt_Films Yogi 

@Aminabina
@By_Elr Yogi
@IamReneeWatkins Yogi  
@YogaPlayground Yogi 
@Dade2Shelby Yogi 
@Bri.Simpson Artist 
Cristian Taxi Costa Rica 

Let me know what you think

Cactus being converted into Bio Degradable Plastic

While some Earth-friendly plastic is now made from corn, cacti don’t need the resources and can be grown on land we don’t need for food production.

This new biodegradable plastic is made from cactus

In a university lab near Guadalajara, Mexico, researchers trim cactus leaves and feed them into a juicer, creating a bright green liquid. When it’s mixed with other natural materials and processed, it undergoes an impressive transformation: The cactus juice becomes a biodegradable plastic.

It’s one experiment to help tackle the world’s plastic problem. Around nineteen billion pounds of plastic ends up in the ocean each year, and as plastic breaks down there and in landfills, it makes its way into the food system; people now eat an annual diet of more than 50,000 pieces of microplastic. Plastic made from cactus wouldn’t necessarily help stop the flow of trash into waterways. But the researchers say that the material biodegrades quickly and is nontoxic if it’s eaten. And unlike plastic made from fossil fuels, the cactus-based plastic is carbon neutral as it breaks down–the carbon dioxide it emits equals the carbon dioxide it took in as a plant as it grew.

[Photo: Sandra Pascoe Ortiz]

The prickly pear cactus used in the experiment, which grows locally, is well suited to become plastic. “The cactus of this species contains a large amount of sugars and gums that favor the formation of the biopolymer,” says Sandra Pascoe Ortiz, a chemical engineering professor at the University of the Valley of Atemajac, who is leading the research.

Cactus also has another advantage over some other plants that are currently used to make plastic. Corn, for example, which is often used to make compostable forks or cups, still has an environmental footprint from the fertilizer and other resources used to grow it. It’s also using land that could be used to grow food. Cactus, which survives in harsh environments with little or no intervention, can grow on land that doesn’t make sense for farming. “It does not require much care for its cultivation and production,” says Pascoe Ortiz.

The resulting material isn’t yet as long-lasting as plastic made from fossil fuels. But it could still be useful in some applications. “We are thinking of products that are disposable, single-use, or that do not need to be durable,” she says. It may also be more biodegradable than other alternatives; corn-based plastic, for example, is unlikely to break down unless it’s in an industrial composting facility, and most consumers still don’t have access to that type of facility. The cactus-based plastic can biodegrade in a backyard composter within a few months.

The researchers are currently working with a company that is interested in bringing the material to market.

Source – FastCompany 

Aboriginal approach to mental health in times of drought

In Australia, psychological tools developed with Aboriginal people can also support farmers whose land is suffering the effects of climate change.

‘If the land is sick, you are sick’

A coal truck roars past, stirring up red dust that blows over the famished cattle and sheep lying in grassless paddocks. The carcasses of dead kangaroos lie next to empty water troughs. There is no birdsong.

Some say it has been the worst drought in a century here across the central and eastern part of Australia. As in other parts of the world, climate change and land clearing are driving soaring temperatures and extreme weather events, including heatwaves and droughts. Australia already sees several weeks each year when temperatures climb above 45ºC, but few people were prepared for the drying-up of dams and waterways.

Food insecurity is now a real threat in parts of the country as livestock and wildlife are dying in inner New South Wales. Farmers are struggling; rates of depression and anxiety are increasing among those who stay.

“I was sleeping for 15 hours a day,” says Richard, a cattle farmer living near White Cliffs in western NSW. “I felt so sick and tired I thought I had cancer. But it was depression.”

His depression hit just before this drought, and was brought on, he thinks, by extreme stress and family issues. But drought only adds to farmers’ stress: it degrades the land, which makes it harder to earn a living.

In 2018, a study from the University of Newcastle in NSW found that farmers in rural parts of the state experienced “significant stress about the effects of drought on themselves, their families and their communities”. Other research suggests that income insecurity related to drought increases the risk of suicide among farmers.

ADVERTISEMENT

Psychologist Pat Dudgeon at the University of Western Australia is used to people suffering in response to extreme stress. She was Australia’s first Aboriginal psychologist, and specialised in suicide prevention because of the mental health issues in her community in the Kimberley, a region of north-west Australia.

Throughout Australia, rates of suicide have increased dramatically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over the past 30 years. The rise is due to ongoing issues of racism, poverty and intergenerational pain, the legacy of centuries of colonisation and mistreatment by British and Australian governments. For instance, many Aboriginal people have had their land taken from them and been forcibly removed to live in missions or be fostered by non-Aboriginal people.

Dudgeon believes many lessons can be learned about grief and trauma from the loss of land and culture that Aboriginal people have experienced. She says psychology can move away from the Western tradition of expert and patient, towards a more narrative form based on Aboriginal traditions and reconnecting with the land. And as more psychologists begin to incorporate these Aboriginal concepts into their practice, such a combined approach might help farmers dealing with drought to reconnect with the land and improve their mental health, too.

“If the land is sick, you are sick,” says Fiona Livingstone, who manages a suicide prevention programme at the University of Newcastle’s Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health.

ADVERTISEMENT

She explains that the traditional Aboriginal concept of health is much broader than that of conventional Western medicine. Aboriginal people, she says, are deeply connected to “country”, the place with which they have spiritual ties. The personal, social and ecological are closely interconnected: “health” is the state in which they are all in balance.

Prolonged drought affects Aboriginal communities in farming regions economically, because it leads to a lack of work. There’s also grief at the loss of nature from the deaths of wild animals and plants. These experiences of not being able to take care of the land during long periods of drought increase stress, leading to an increase in antisocial and risk-taking behaviour such as drug dependence and drinking. People begin to “mistrust each other, gossip maliciously and turn against each other,” say the authors of one report. Droughts can have the effect of “exacerbating underlying grief and trauma”.

Read the full article at Scroll 

Hawaii 1890, The oldest known photograph of Surfer

Dating back to 1890 this is perhaps the first photo ever taken of a surfer. The muscled Hawaiian beach man is photographed wearing a traditional loin cloth and shown standing in the shallows holding his rudimentary board. The original owner and the photographer are not known.

Source – vintage everyday

Ghana Investing Billions Into the Cashew Industry

Under one of Ghana’s economic boom policies; Planting for Export and Rural Development (PERD), the government of Ghana is making huge investment into the cashew industry to provide job for the people and also to increase the country’s economic standing.

In return, the cashew industry is expected to yield to the nation some US$2.5 billion in the next five years, Mr Augustine Collins Ntim, a Deputy Minister of Local Government and Rural Development, made this known.

He indicated that the government has devoted GHC1 billion towards the establishment of a Tree Crop Development Authority that would regulate the cashew industry and revamp that sector to contribute significantly to the country’s Gross Domestic Product.

Mr Ntim, who is responsible for Rural Economic Development and Agriculture, directed the Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies (MMDAs) to raise the targeted 100,000 cashew seedlings under the Planting for Export and Rural Development (PERD) programme to meet the target.

The cashew seedlings would be supplied to registered farmers under the PERD programme free of charge for plantation.

He said the PERD has come to stay and that government is contemplating on engaging unemployed youth to plant the cashew seedlings for farmers.

Interacting with the Heads of Department (HODs) and staff of the Pru East District Assembly at Yeji in the Bono East Region, the Deputy Minister said the successful implementation of the Planting for Food and Jobs (PfFJs) and the PERD programmes depended mostly on the MMDAs.

Source – http://thepeoplesnewsafrica.com/ghana-is-investing-billons-in-cashew-industry/

El Mirador: The Ancient Lost City of the Maya | Ancient Architects

When you think of the Maya ruins of Guatemala, you often think of the Great Plaza of Tikal, a city that was thriving between 700 to 800 AD with pyramids and palaces aplenty. The ruins are iconic, being one of the largest archaeological sites of the pre-Columbian Maya civilisation, covering more than 6 square miles and boasting an incredible 3,000 structures. Much like the Mexican site of Teotihuacan, compared to the relatively unknown Great Pyramid of Cholula, the ancient city of Tikal overshadows another superpower of the Maya, the lost city of El Mirador, which is today lost within the dense jungle of Guatemala. El Mirador, thought to be the ancient capital city of the Maya, rose to prominence many centuries before Tikal and flourished between the sixth century BC and the first century AD. As well as being the home of tens of thousands of people, it also had several thousand stone structures, including the tallest structure ever built by the Maya – La Danta Pyramid. Watch this video to learn more about the lost city of the Maya, as well as the thousands more structures that have recently turned up in LiDAR scans of Guatemala. History is being re-written.

Book Select – How to Change Your Mind

I’ve been meaning to post this book after hearing about it on a podcast with Joe. I noticed the person next to me on the plane was reading it. He thought it would an interesting read being he just made it back from Japan after serving 9 months in jail for LSD. More coincidences like this are more confirmation that I should be starting this podcast ASAP. Everyone has an experience to tell.

When Michael Pollan set out to research how LSD and psilocybin (the active ingredient in magic mushrooms) are being used to provide relief to people suffering from difficult-to-treat conditions such as depression, addiction and anxiety, he did not intend to write what is undoubtedly his most personal book. But upon discovering how these remarkable substances are improving the lives not only of the mentally ill but also of healthy people coming to grips with the challenges of everyday life, he decided to explore the landscape of the mind in the first person as well as the third. Thus began a singular adventure into various altered states of consciousness, along with a dive deep into both the latest brain science and the thriving underground community of psychedelic therapists. Pollan sifts the historical record to separate the truth about these mysterious drugs from the myths that have surrounded them since the 1960s, when a handful of psychedelic evangelists inadvertently catalyzed a powerful backlash against what was then a promising field of research. 

Available on Amazon

A Plane Made Only From Hemp ?

Hempearth, the Canadian cannabis firm, has designed the world’s first plane made and powered by hemp – the non-psychoactive member of the cannabis family 10 times stronger than steel. Interestingly, everything from the seats, the wings, the plane walls and even the pillows are made from hemp. The plane, with a wingspan of 36 feet, can hold one pilot and four passengers. What’s more? It runs on 100% hemp oil!

Hemp is lighter than traditional aerospace materials (such as aluminium and fiberglass) and therefore requires a lot less fuel to reach a high altitude. Most importantly, hemp is non-toxic, sustainable, requires way less water and land to grow than cotton, and compared to steel or carbon fibre, has almost no environmental impact.

Hempearth CEO Derek Kesek says:

“This plane project is our first experiment with industrial hemp, and we plan to explore many other uses. Once we establish structural testing and information from this project, we will apply it to other forms of construction. This is the kind of future we all want here on Earth. The sky may not be the limit.”

Hempearth is also developing hemp composites in Montreal, which could replace all fiberglass in aviation and other industries — such as construction.  It recently turned down Dupont as they “don’t and never will sign or work with fascist companies that are associated with military, The Rockefellers, The Rothchilds and or the Military Industrial Complex”.

“I build things organically and take it one thing at a time,” Kesek adds. “Richard Branson is my biggest inspiration because he is showing that it’s not business as usual any more: if you want something you go get it.”

When the first hemp plane is completed, its first flight is set to take place at The Wright Brother’s Memorial in Kitty Hawk North Carolina – the birthplace of aviation.

%d bloggers like this: