Mushrooms x Bees = MycoHoney

Mushrooms Saving The Bees

Presenting at the recent Bioneers Annual Conference, Paul Stamets gave bombshell evidence that there is hope for bees, colony collapse, and our entire ecosystem. Washington State University recently completed a longevity stress test on bee populations that appears to confirm that the genes for the detoxification pathways in bees are turned on by beneficial fungi they collect from their environment. What’s more, it has been confirmed in previous testing that the red belted polypore mushroom degrades pesticides, herbicides and fungicides. It has also been confirmed in previous tests that fungicidal contamination reduces beneficial fungi in honey bee colonies. So what does this all mean? The widespread pesticide, herbicide and fungicide have created an absence of beneficial fungi in bee colonies. This turns off the proper detoxification pathways within the bees and their colonies leading to a hyper-accumulation of toxins. Colony collapses typically follows shortly thereafter.

What appears to hold a key to slowing down or even stopping the current epidemic of bee colony collapse is a solution called “Mycohoney,” made from the polypore mushroom mycelium. When fed to bees in the University of Washington trials, it showed extraordinary significance in life extension of the honey bees. Walter S. Sheppard, PhD P.F. Thurber Professor, Chair, Department of Entomology Washington State University gave this comment:

As an entomologist with 39 years’ experience studying bees, I am unaware of any reports of materials that extend the life of worker bees more than this.”

Read more about Mycology and the way it helps save the world at AetherForce.com 

3 thoughts on “Mushrooms x Bees = MycoHoney”

  1. My question IS: Since I am a BeeKeeper, how do I get the Mycelium of the Red Belted Polyspore to my bees? Can I buy an extract and put some in their syrup, or find some and grind and spread in woodchips keeping it moist….WHAT and HOW???? Thank you.

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