Medicinal Use of Pine Trees

Self-Aid

Medicinal Properties include: antiseptic, astringent, inflammatory, antioxidant, expectoranthigh in Vitamin C for colds – flu – coughs, congestion, and even scurvy. Shikimic acid, the main ingredient in Tamiflu, is harvested from pine needles in Asia.

A.) Pine Needle Tea: Drink a cup of pine needle tea to extract the useful stuff when you feel flu-like symptoms in your body. More research can be found here.

How to Make Pine Needle Tea

Add a few pine needles to a cup of boiled water (Don’t boil the needles in the water as this will release un-tasty turpenes). Allow to steep for 3 to 5 minutes. Add natural sweetener if you like. I prefer pine needles only for a Vitamin C boost! (Dont consume pine needle tea if you are pregnant)

B.) Pine Bark Band Aid: The inner bark can be fashioned as an antiseptic Band Aid for cuts and scraps. Apply to wound and secure with duct tape, bandana, or cordage.

Inner bark Band Aid from the pine tree

C.) Pine Sap/Resin: This sticky sap can also be used to cover wounds, blisters, and burns. Collect hardened sap from a wounded tree and heat it to make it pliable.

Mowers scared this tree on a power line. The white streaks are pine sap. Older sap is easier to collect when it forms a amber "ball" at a wound.

D.) Pine Pollen: The yellow pine pollen that blankets the south in the spring is actually beneficial, not only for pine tree reproduction, but also for boosting our energy levels with small levels of testosterone.

Arthur Haines describes on his YouTube channel how pine pollen provides multiple avenues of protection against radioactive cesium. The endogenous antioxidants that are promoted by pine pollen are protective of DNA against radioactive particles.

Woodcraft Uses

E.) Bug Dope: “Nussmuk” (George Washington Sears) described his effective insect repellent in the North Woods with its main ingredient being pine resin. Once applied, a bronze protective film gave his skin weeks of protection from pesky biting insects.

Woodcraft and Camping by "Nessmuk"

F.) Firecraft: Fat lighter’d (fatwood, lighter wood, fat lighter, pine knot) is in every fire kit I own. It’s plentiful in Georgia and hard to beat as a natural fire starter/extender – especially in wet conditions.

Shavings from fatwood will ignite with a ferrro rod.

G.) Pine Bark Bacon: Inner bark is edible . Check out this woodsman at Survival Topics frying pine bark like bacon!

H.) Core Temperature Control: Debris shelter roofing, pine bough bed for insulation against conductive heat lose, shelter construction,

I.) Pine Pitch Glue: Used for hafting arrowheads, fletching arrows, patching holes in tarps, seal containers, fire extender, waterproofing equipment – really, any stuff that needs adhesive.

Pine Bark Extract and How It Benefits Male Health

Here’s a quick look at some of the exciting research to date on the benefits of pine bark extract for men’s health.

Prostate

One investigative study was conducted to see whether the proanthocyanidins found in pine bark extract exerted effects on prostate cancer cells. Researchers tested and measured prostate cells applied with pine bark extract via cancer markers. Pine bark extract was found to have powerful effects on the LNCaP line of prostate cancer cells. The extract was shown to reduce proliferation of harmful cells and even promote cell death, via down­regulation of the expression of the androgen receptors. [4]

Infertility

A study conducted for 3 months regarding male infertility looked at a group of subfertile men who supplemented with Pycnogenol daily. The researchers found that sperm morphology increased significantly – an impressive 38% improvement. Researchers concluded that since fertility and function responded positively, Pycnogenol may be a safe, effective, and less-invasive alternative to in­-vitro fertilization, among other more expensive, risky therapies. [5]

Erectile Response

A double-­blind, placebo-­controlled study — the gold standard of studies — was conducted to investigate the effects, if any, a combination supplement containing Pycnogenol on erectile dysfunction. The study participants were divided equally into a Pycnogenol containing supplement group and a placebo group.

At the conclusion of the study, men supplementing with the Pycnogenol saw a significant 56% improvement in erectile function and associated markers compared with just 21% improvement in the placebo group. Total testosterone levels were found to have risen 16% in the supplemented group compared to an inconsequential 3% increase in the placebo group. [6]

Researchers have concluded that pine bark extract is believed to have a direct effect in stimulating nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells in the body which line the smooth muscle of the male reproductive organs. This in turn may have a very powerful effect on endothelial dysfunction, not just erectile dysfunction. [7]

Bottom Line

Pycnogenol has been one of the superstars of natural health approaches over the centuries. As future research studies are conducted on this potent natural remedy, its promise and application will continue to expand. Regarding male health benefits, the results are probably too early to tell definitively but definitely prompt excitement at the possibility that pine bark extract may be a beneficial, can’t-­miss addition to your supplement regimen.

Read the full article at Survival Sherpa

For more PineBark Info go to GHC

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s