Give the Red Light to Red Meat

Eating meat hardens blood vessels

A compound found in red meat (and even used as an additive in some energy drinks) called carnitine has been found to cause atherosclerosis, the hardening or clogging of the arteries, according to a study published in the journal Nature Medicine. The research, which included more than 2,500 vegans, vegetarians, and omnivore cardiac patients, suggests that carnitine converts to a heart-damaging compound, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), via bacteria in the intestine. Researchers found that increased carnitine levels predicted increased risks for cardiovascular disease.

Your vegetarian friends might outlive you

A study from Harvard School of Public Health found an association with red meat consumption and increased risk of a shortened lifespan. Eating healthier protein sources such as fish, poultry, nuts, and legumes was associated with a lower risk of mortality. “We know processed red meat like hot dogs and salami are the worst,” says Larry Santora, MD, medical director of the Dick Butkus Center for Cardiovascular Wellness, Saint Joseph Hospital, Orange, California. The cause is not clear, but it may be in the preparation, since charring meat increases toxins (nitrosamines) that can lead to cancer of the stomach, says Dr. Santora.

You’re eating pink slime

The meat industry refers to it as “lean finely textured beef (LFTB),” but the public knows it as pink slime. This meat additive contains fatty bits of leftover meat that’s heated, spun to remove the fat, and then treated with ammonia gas to kill bacteria. It’s then shipped off to grocery stores and meat packers, where the slime is added to ground beef (70% of supermarket ground beef contains the additive).

And the ammonia treatment may allow pathogens into the food supply. “The real danger comes from the preparation and the likelihood that the bacteria will spread in your kitchen,” says Michael Schmidt, PhD, professor at the department of microbiology and immunology at the Medical University of South Carolina.

That expensive filet may be “glued” together scraps

Binding together smaller cuts of meat into a larger serving can be done with a “meat glue” called transglutaminase, an enzyme formerly harvested from animal blood, but now produced through fermentation of bacteria. When added to meat, it forms an invisible bond, making a round filet mignon shape out of smaller pieces. Although it’s on the USDA’s GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) list, the more pieces of stuck-together meat you’re eating, the higher the risk of contamination. “The question to ask is how many cows are in the ‘glue’ you’re eating,” says Dr. Schmidt. The more cows, the greater the risk. (Vegetarians, you’re not quite off the hook here: transglutaminase can be used in some meatless products like tofu, yogurt, and cereal, so buy products as close to their natural states as possible.)

Livestock production impacts the planet in a huge way

If you drive a fuel-efficient car and use reusable cloth grocery bags to shop, you can further help the planet by cutting out meat as well. Meat impacts the environment more than any other food we eat, mainly because livestock require much more land, food, water, and energy than plants to raise and transport. Producing a four-ounce (quarter pound) hamburger, for example, requires 7 pounds of grain and forage, 53 gallons of drinking water and irrigating feed crops, 75 square feet for grazing and growing feed crops, and 1,036 BTUs for feed production and transport—enough to power a microwave for 18 minutes

Meat puts your colon and brain at risk

Meat contains a whole lot of iron which, when eaten in excess, can raise levels of iron in the brain and may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to a recent study from UCLA. When iron accumulates in the brain, myelin—a fatty tissue that coats nerve fibers—is destroyed. This disrupts brain communication, and signs of Alzheimer’s appear.

Eating red and processed meats also greatly increases the risk of colorectal cancer in people with a genetic predisposition. Affecting one in three individuals, the gene plays a role in the immune system, according to researchers. If you have this gene, eating and digesting meat may trigger an immune or inflammatory response.

Source – Prevention 

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