The Caral Pyramid Complex

The Caral Pyramid Complex, just three hours north of Lima is one of the largest Pyramid fields in the world and is even officially noted as the oldest city of the Americas. It’s construction is attributed to the Norte Chico civilization, a pre-columbian society that ruled Peru’s northern coast more than five thousand years ago. According to mainstream archaeology the Caral complex was built a millennium after Sumer in Mesopotamia and contemporaneous with the building of the Egyptian Pyramids. Caral predates the Olmec culture by two millennia and is also only one of six places in the ancient world where civilization originated separately. Meaning there was no prior contact and all these civilizations just happened to rise up out of nowhere on their own. And build pyramids no less! Looking at the ancient pyramid fields of Caral and being free from the chains of having to fit everything into the false timeline of mainstream history, we can clearly see that the pyramids of Peru are far more archaic than five thousand years. Even the civilization that supposedly built them lacked ceramics, writing and apparently had almost no art, yet they somehow built monumental structures, including large earthwork platform mounds and sunken circular plazas. That is because the society archaeology attaches to the Caral complex didn’t build the original megalithic monuments found buried underneath the various layers of rocks that the Norte Chico and later Moche Indians rebuilt. This theme is repeated throughout history when the subject of an ancient or forgotten culture leaves behind unexplained monuments. For example, the mysterious Mounds that litter the Ohio valley and Southeastern America are attributed to local Natives despite the Indians themselves claiming they never built the mounds and that a lost race had built them ages ago. Mainstream archaoelogy ignores this fact, dimisses indignenous traditions and continues writing thier own version of history anyways. This scenario is repeated at Caral, as the Indians associated with the site seem to have just moved in and occupied the place and then vanished at some point in the past. But bones and pottery shards discovered near the pyramids does not prove the people associated with them actually built the original complexes. There are more pyramid sites found within the general area of Caral, and because of the close proximity of the ocean it makes sense that these sites were built in an era when the shoreline was closer. Caral also exhibits archaeologic similarities with ruins found in Ancient turkey. Even examples of Cyclopean Greek architecture show up in Caral. Some of the ruins even look like they could be sitting in a desolate desert in Egypt.
The amphitheater  looks exactly like something we can see in ancient Greece. The Caral pyramid complex in Peru is staggering and ancient. The late Phil Coppens writes:

The site is in fact so old that it predates the ceramic period, the reason why no pottery was found. Its importance resides in its domestication of plants, especially cotton, but also beans, squashes and guava.

As mentioned, the heart of the site covers 150 acres and contains six stone platform mounds – pyramids. The largest mound measures 154 by 138 metres, though it rises only to a height of twenty metres; two sunken plazas are at the base of the mound and a large plaza connects all the mounds. The largest pyramid of Peru was terraced with a staircase leading up to an atrium-like platform, culminating in a flattened top housing enclosed rooms and a ceremonial fire pit. All pyramids were built in one or two phases, which means that there was a definitive plan in erecting these monuments. The design of the central plaza would also later be incorporated in all similar structures across the Andes in the millennia to come – thus showing that Caral was a true cradle of civilisation. Around the pyramids were many residential structures. One house revealed the remains of a body that was buried in the wall and appears to have been a natural death, rather than evidence of human sacrifice. Amongst the artefacts discovered are 32 flutes made from pelican and animal bones, engraved with the figures of birds and monkeys. It shows that though situated along the Pacific coast, its inhabitants were aware of the animals of the Amazon. The discovery of Caral has therefore reintroduced a powerful enigma: at the same time, on two different continents, agricultural advancements created a new style of life.

The available workforce that agriculture had created was reemployed in the construction of pyramids. This “template” is visible in Peru, Sumer and Egypt, all in the 3rd millennium BC. Coincidence, or evidence of design? Alternative researchers will certainly soon reopen this debate, but archaeologists steer well clear of it. Caral is indeed hard to accept. It is very old. Still, its dating of 2627 BC is beyond dispute, based as it is on carbondating reed and woven carrying bags that were found in situ. These bags were used to carry the stones that were used for the construction of the pyramids. The material is an excellent candidate for dating, thus allowing for a high precision.

The town itself had a population of approximately 3000 people. But there are 17 other sites in the area, allowing for a possible total population of 20,000 people for the Supe valley. Indeed, the Caral archaeological team broke up to investigate some of the other sites, such as along the Pativilca River, the next river to the north, and the Fortaleza, just north of the Pativilca. All of these sites share similarities with Caral. They have small platforms or stone circles and all were major urban centres on par with Caral – though some of them were even older than Caral.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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