Melanin 102

Melanin is important because it’s the most primitive and universal pigment in living organisms. Melanin is produced in the pineal gland. Abundantly found in primitive organisms such as fungi, as well as advanced primates. Furthermore, within each living organism, melanin appears to be located in the major functional sites. For example, in vertebrates, melanin is not only present in the skin, eyes, ears, central nervous system, it can also be found in the pineal gland, pituitary gland, thyroid gland, thymus gland, adrenal gland, and the barathary gland. Melanin is abundantly present in the viscera, including the heart, liver, arteries, the muscles, and the gastrointestinal tract; thus, within each and every living organ which aids the human body melanin appears. Regardless of what color your skin appears to be all genes in all creatures on this planet are black because they are coated with melanin.

The amount of melanin in the skin is one of the most variable of human traits, and many polygenes are involved. Groups of people or the population of the world were once classified according to the skin shade: Black (Nubians), White (Caucasians), Yellow (Orientals) and Red (Native Americans) etc… We must realize that just because this is the way they have classified people does not mean this is the way it should be. The hues of color of your skin depend on several factors. First is the amount of melanin in the outer layers of the skin. Melanin acts as a filter to prevent damage to the delicate deeper layers of the skin, by penetration of ultraviolet light.

There is more than one type of melanin. You have brain melanin, also known as neuromelanin, and you have skin melanin. Neuromelanin does not run parallel with skin melanin. Whether white, red, yellow, black, or brown, neuromelanin plays an important role in functioning of the brain, and nervous system. Melanosomes (small structures within the melanocyte cells where melanin is synthesized) find their way into the hair cells, giving them color. (Two types of melanin, one dark brown and one red, are responsible for all hair shades).

Pigments that contribute to skin color are called carotene, a yellowish hemoglobin, in blood vessels (pink-red), and melanin (black, brown, red). Darker skins are dominated by melanin, which is produced from the amino acid tyrosine, by pigment cells (melanocytes) in the skin. Melanocytes are characterized by long, fixed extensions of the outer cell membrane. In humans, other mammals, and birds, melanin is dispersed permantely throughout each melanocyte, including the extensions, and is also, transported to nearby skin cells. In other words, if you increase the amount of melanin in the skin you become darker and vice versa.

So, what is so important about melanin? Melanin controls all mental and physical body activities. Melanin is an extremely stable molecule, and highly resistant to the digestion by most acids and bases, and is one of the hardest molecule to ever be analyzed. If you do not purify your melanin molecule, you will not heal your body of diseases.

In parts of Africa, India, and Australia the deposits of melanin in the skin is heaviest because the people have been exposed to the most intense sunlight for generations. Northern Europeans have the least amount of deposits in their skin are lighter, not to mention their weather is cloudy and cool. The thickness of the outer layer of the skin is also a factor. People with darker skin complexions have thicker layers of skin. And this is a factor alone enhances the skins filtering effect. The thinner the skin the least melanin. When the skin is very thin, the blood vessels show through and give a pinkish color. When an individual adapts to the shifting of the intensity of the sunlight, the skin becomes darker because they are exposed to more sunlight. That’s how you get suntans because it’s the result of both thickening and increasing the melanin in the skin. Keratin is the substance the nails of the fingers and toes are made of. It also appears in the outer layer of the skin. When keratin deposits are heavy, the skin has a yellowish, brown shade, as in the Mongolian populations. They have adapted along a different pathway to avoid the damaging effects of ultraviolet light. The reddish hue of the Native Americans results from a combination of keratin and melanin deposits.

Read the full article here at Sankofa

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