All posts by Breath of Life

The best part of life is

FDA Presents: DEAD RINGER

DEAD RINGER l Bridging the gap between inspiration and recognition.

@jemireese + @eyefocus
Group Exhibition
12 painters + 12 photographers
Saturday 06.03.17 l 7-11pm
MURMUR MEDIA
100 Broad St SW, Atlanta
Wonder what they’ll produce together? We’ll see, can’t wait.
#JessicaHill
#Jahaan
#futuredeadartists
#supportlivingartists
#deadringerFDA
#FDAapproved
#DEADRINGER
#murmurmedia
#painting
#photography
#atlanta
http://www.futuredeadartists.com

 

Advertisements

Visual Periodic Table Break down

Thanks to high school, we’ve all got a pretty good idea about what’s on the periodic table.

But whether you’re looking at something common like calcium, iron, and carbon, or something more obscure like krypton and antimony, how well do you know their functions? Could you name just one practical application for vanadium or ruthenium?

Lucky for us, Keith Enevoldsen from elements.wlonk.com has come up with this awesome periodic table that gives you at least one example for every single element (except for those weird superheavy elements that don’t actually exist in nature).

There’s thulium for laser eye surgery, cerium for lighter flints, and krypton for flashlights. You’ve got strontium for fireworks, and xenon for high-intensity lamps inside lighthouses.

Oh and that very patriotic element, americium? We use that in smoke detectors.

We’ve included a sneak-peak below, but for the real interactive experience, click here to try it out.

period-1Keith Enevoldsen

You can also download the PDF if you’ve got a class to teach, or maybe you just want to be great and put it on your bathroom door.

And if this whole exercise has made you realise just how rusty you’ve become with your science basics, check out AsapSCIENCE’s Periodic Table Song below.

We’d like to see a better way of memorising the periodic table – it’s even got the four brand new elements that earned a permanent spot in the seventh row back in January (which unfortunately have no cool uses outside of atomic research).

Check it out:

 

H/T SPLOID

Source – ScienceAlert

Clean energy in Costa Rica

For more than 250 days of 2016, Costa Rica ran entirely on renewables.

It was the second year running that the Central American country of 4.9 million people powered itself on 100% renewable electricity for more than two thirds of the year.

Over the course of 2016, renewables supplied 98.1% of Costa Rica’s electricity, slightly down from the 98.8% achieved in 2015.

On days when Costa Rica did not generate all its electricity from renewable sources, the extra capacity came from diesel-fuelled thermal power plants, a spokesman for the Costa Rican Electricity Institute (ICE) told Mashable.

Image: ICE

As the graphic above shows, hydropower is Costa Rica’s dominant energy source, accounting for almost three quarters of electricity generation in 2016. It is followed by geothermal energy, which provided 12.74% in 2016, then wind power at 10.3%, diesel-fuelled thermal power plants at 1.88%, biomass at 0.72%, and solar power at just 0.01%.

Renewables without hydropower

Hydropower is currently the largest single renewable electricity source, providing 16% of the world’s electricity, according to the International Energy Agency. It’s also a relatively cheap form of energy, but there are concerns about its environmental impact – the dams required to create hydropower plants can alter ecosystems, harm fish stocks and impact the lives of local people.

Like nuclear, hydropower provides a stable base load that renewable electricity sources like wind power and solar photovoltaic are unable to match, due to their intermittency.

Indeed, countries that produce close to 100% of renewable electricity tend to share two features in common – relatively small populations, and large hydropower generating capacity relative to energy demand.

According to data from the World Bank, both Albania and Paraguay generated 100% of their electricity from hydropower in 2013.

Iceland, meanwhile, generated 100% of its electricity from renewable sources: 71% from hydropower and the bulk of the remainder from its extensive geothermal resources.

The total amount of electricity generated by Albania, Paraguay and Iceland combined in 2013 was 85.5 terawatt hours (with 60.4 terawatt hours generated by Paraguay). To put this in context, the world’s largest electricity producer, China, generated 5,422 terawatt hours over the same period – two thirds of which came from coal-fired power plants.

When hydropower is taken out of the renewable electricity mix, the proportions fall considerably from 100%:

This chart shows electricity production from renewable sources, excluding hydroelectric (% of total)

Image: World Bank

Wind power pioneer Denmark leads the way, while Iceland still performs strongly thanks to its geothermal resources.

However, these figures are from 2014, and as a result Costa Rica’s rapid growth in wind power installations are not included. The country’s investment in wind farms in recent years means it is on schedule to more than double its wind generating capacity from 194 MW in early 2015 to 393 MW in 2017.

The 10.3% of its electricity generated by wind power in 2016 meant that 23.8% of Costa Rica’s electricity in 2016 came from renewables excluding hydro – beating more than half of the top 10 countries ranked by the World Bank in 2014.

Sustainable development

In the World Economic Forum’s Global Energy Architecture Performance Index (EAPI), Costa Rica is ranked 14th out of 127 nations.

Image: EAPI

The EAPI looks at 18 indicators covering three key areas: economic growth and development, environmental sustainability and energy access and security. Costa Rica ranks 11th for economic growth and development, 18th for environmental sustainability, and 62nd on energy access and security.

Source – WeForum

Cloud House

CLOUD HOUSE is a unique rain harvesting system that creatively reuses the rainwater it collects to provide a deeper look into the natural systems that give us the food we eat. It is a sensory experience that amplifies the connection between our existence and the natural world.

PRESS RELEASE – drive.google.com/file/d/0B-T3JvWIFb1WQVZ4ZE9ld3V1RDA/view

On rainy days, a gutter system collects rain that hits the roof and directs it to a storage tank underneath the house. Sitting in the rocking chairs triggers a pump that brings the collected rainwater up into the ‘cloud’ to drop onto the roof, producing that warm pleasant sound of rain on a tin roof. At the same time, rainwater drops from the tops of the windows onto the edible plants growing in the windowsills.
Designed to collect and store rainwater for the ‘cloud’ to rain, this display of the water cycle illustrates our dependence on the fragile natural systems that grow the food we eat: at points throughout the year when there is low rainfall, the ‘cloud’ will not rain on the roof because it is simply out of water.

CLOUD HOUSE is clad with barn wood and tin reclaimed from a nearby abandoned farm by a group of Amish builders. With rocking chairs on a barn wood floor, the sound of rain on a tin roof, and rain drops bringing the necessary elements for plants growing in the window sills, the look and feel of CLOUD HOUSE are the epitome of a rural farm experience from simpler times and offer a space to reflect on the natural processes of food production.

Located at Springfield, MO’s largest farmers’ market, CLOUD HOUSE is a poetic countterpoint to the busy market, inviting visitors to a meditative space in which they can slow down, enjoy the fresh edible plants, and listen to rain on a tin roof.

“For years, grocery stores have provided food that relies on large agro-conglomerates with unsustainable farming practices, international food distributors, and chemical companies. Many people have demanded that we have another relationship with our food that focuses on personal health, the health of the planet, and supporting local community. Farmer’s markets, like the one at Farmers Park, give the option to know by whom and how our food is made. However, the changing climate has brought a new threat of increased instability to our food systems by creating unpredictable weather patterns, which we are seeing as more drought in some locations and more floods in other locations. This makes it harder and harder to grow food. It is becoming increasingly important that we have a clear understanding of how closely we are tied to ecological systems like the water cycle. CLOUD HOUSE offers a moment to sit in a rocking chair and listen to the rain on the tin roof to reflect upon the fragile dance we are in with nature and our own survival.”

PROJECT TEAM
Matt O’Reilly at Green Circle Projects – Developer | Patricia Lea Watts – Project Manager | Jeff Broekhoven – Artistic Advising | Sujin Lim – Cloud Design | Ben Jennings -Structural Engineer | Sue Evans and Kenny Underwood at Elemoose – Cloud Construction | Omar Galal and John Walker at Rain Reserve -Water System | Aaron Sampson at SamCo Construction LLC – Barn Wood Siding and Tin Roof Steve | Wilson at Wilson Creek Rustic Furniture – ootings/Piers | Richard Thompson at CHR Metals – Steel Framing | Bryan Simmons at A Cut Above – Landscaping Jeff Shelton Outdoor Lawn Service, Gravel | Pam Bachus at Picky Sisters, Rocking Chairs and Table | Tim Hawley – Photography

High-Res and Low-Res Images of CLOUD HOUSE: timhawley.com/160412_CloudHouse.zip

For More of Matthew Mazzotta’s work — matthewmazzotta.com/home.html

Cuba’s Lung Cancer Vaccine Explained

Dr. Kelvin Lee, Chair of the Department of Immunology at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, shares the groundbreaking potential of CIMAvax-EGF, a lung cancer vaccine developed in Cuba.

What we know so far: 0:00
The innovation that led to CIMAvax: 1:09
Benefits for high-risk patients: 2:02
The future of CIMAvax: 4:12
The science behind CIMAvax: 5:15
The safety of CIMAvax: 5:47
The Cuban collaboration: 6:17

President Barack Obama became the first president to visit Cuba in almost 90 years when he and first lady Michelle Obama traveled to the island nation in March. But one of the most exciting things about the thawing of relations between Cuba and the U.S. is happening stateside right now: the possibility of clinical trials on a drug to prevent lung cancer, and possibly other cancers, too.

CimaVax, which is both a treatment and vaccine for lung cancer, has been researched in Cuba for 25 years and free to the Cuban public since 2011. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s trade mission to Cuba in April 2015 resulted in a signed agreement to bring CimaVax to the U.S., but as with all international drugs and treatments, U.S. researchers need to conduct clinical trials and replicate international scientists’ results before it becomes available to the American public.

“We’re still at the very early stages of assessing the promise of this vaccine, but the evidence so far from clinical trials in Cuba and Europe has been striking,” said Dr. Kelvin Lee, Jacobs Family Chair in Immunology and co-leader of the Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy Program at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York, the research center that is evaluating CimaVax for U.S. use.

The hoped-for success of CimaVax availability in the U.S. is just one example of the possibilities that come with open trade between the two nations. When Obama loosened the United State’s 55-year trade embargo against Cuba in December, he allowed for such joint research deals to be finalized. Similar programs might have been impossible just a few years ago.

“You never know how long these things would take,” said Candace Johnson, CEO of Roswell Park. “We would have loved to have had this already started because we’ve been working on this for quite a while, but we’re persistent and we’ll get it done.”

Cuba has long been known for its high-quality cigars, and lung cancer is a major public health problem and the fourth-leading cause of death in the country. A 2007 study of patients with stages IIIB and IV lung cancer, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, confirmed the safety of the CimaVax and showed an increase in tumor-reducing antibody production in more than half of cases. It proved particularly effective for increased survival if the study participant was younger than 60.

Read the full article at HP 

Benefits of a Hyperbaric Chamber

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a medical treatment which enhances the body’s natural healing process by inhalation of 100% oxygen in a total body chamber, where atmospheric pressure is increased and controlled.  It is used for a wide variety of treatments usually as a part of an overall medical care plan.

Under normal circumstances, oxygen is transported throughout the body only by red blood cells. With HBOT, oxygen is dissolved into all of the body’s fluids, the plasma, the central nervous system fluids, the lymph, and the bone and can be carried to areas where circulation is diminished or blocked.  In this way, extra oxygen can reach all of the damaged tissues and the body can support its own healing process.  The increased oxygen greatly enhances the ability of white blood cells to kill bacteria, reduces swelling and allows new blood vessels to grow more rapidly into the affected areas.  It is a simple, non-invasive and painless treatment.

What are the benefits of HBOT?

It has long been known that healing many areas of the body cannot take place without appropriate oxygen levels in the tissue.  Most illnesses and injuries occur, and often linger, at the cellular or tissue level.  In many cases, such as: circulatory problems; non-healing wounds; and strokes, adequate oxygen cannot reach the damaged area and the body’s natural healing ability is unable to function properly.  Hyperbaric oxygen therapy provides this extra oxygen naturally and with minimal side effects.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves the quality of life of the patient in many areas when standard medicine is not working.  Many conditions such as stroke, cerebral palsy, head injuries, and chronic fatigue have responded favorably to HBOT.

 What conditions does HBOT treat?

Hyperbaric oxygen is used to treat all conditions which benefit from increased tissue oxygen availability, as well as infections where it can be used for its antibiotic properties, either as the primary therapy, or in conjunction with other drugs.

Insurance and Medicare consider  the following conditions for HBOT to be covered for payment:

Air or Gas Embolism
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Compartment Syndrome/Crush Injury/Other Traumatic Ischemias
Decompression Sickness (Bends)
Diabetic and Selected Wounds
Exceptional Blood Loss (Anemia)
Gas Gangrene
Intracranial Abscess
Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection
Osteoradionecrosis and Radiation Tissue Damage
Osteomyelitis (Refractory)
Skin Grafts and (Compromised) Flaps
Thermal Burns

Source – Hbot