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The best part of life is

The Bodhi Tree

Bodhi: (boe-dee) Sanskrit word meaning “to awaken to, to understand, to know.”

The Bodhi-Tree or wisdom-tree is the world tree, and its roots drink deep of the waters of infinity. Its branches and leaves blow in the winds of the Void, and it is lit by the clear light. It is a tree of refuge, a place of safety from the raging tigers and dragons of desire.BodhiTree1

Each leaf has the bright green of spring, and its bark has the darkness and fragrance of the forest. It has fruits of knowledge but these are not fruits forbidden to mankind by a jealous god. These fruits of knowledge are intended for all beings. While the fruits on the lower limbs give knowledge of good and evil, and awareness of many lives, those on the upper limbs give knowledge of unity and immortality.

The image of the Bodhi-Tree at this site has two components – the tree itself and its reflection. The tree represents life which is outwardly full of desire, sorrow, and ignorance. Its reflected image represents life’s perfection. It is life as reflected by pure, clean, awareness. It is what life can be in its ideal form and when understood in its true nature.bb Here, life is a set of changing reflections with no permanent anchor in physical form. The tree reflected in the water is like the self reflected in awareness. From a distance and without close examination, the tree like both the person and physical world appear to be whole and consistent things. Without meditation, physical forms appear solid and enduring. Their changing and fluctuating nature is not visible.

The Bodhi-Tree or wisdom-tree is a sacred symbol in Buddhism for a number of reasons.

  • It represents the place of the Buddha’s enlightenment, and is therefore sacred geographically.
  • It is ancient. Some would say it is the mythical World Tree. Thus, it is sacred temporally.
  • It represents growth towards liberation. Therefore, it is sacred developmentally.
  • It was said to rain blossoms, and is thus sacred aesthetically.

The Bodhi-Tree is a symbolic representation of the individual’s journey to infinity. As the seed which begins tiny and hard grows open and free, so should the mind and heart

Full Article here at Wisdom Tree

Pranayama: The Nose Knows

The topic of breathing and pranayama (the practice that works to direct the movement of life force) is a fascinating one.

Exhaling through the mouth can be beneficial in that it allows for a greater volume of air to be released at once and may help your jaw to relax. We all do this naturally when we are exasperated, tired, or weary. Take a breath in, then breathe out with a soft, sighing sound: You will feel your shoulders release, and as your jaw releases, your tongue will relax down into the base of the mouth, creating a quieting effect on your mind.16963-122

However, in most instances, it’s preferable to breathe through your nose. There are several reasons for this.

The first reason is that the nose does much more than just let air in and out. There are texts that claim it performs more than 30 functions, such as containing the receptors for smell, filtering out dirt and pathogens, and moisturizing and warming incoming air.

The yogic viewpoint is less concerned with the mechanical functions of the nose and breath and more interested in the process of how our breathing affects the nervous system. The ancient texts describe a network of subtle channels, called nadis, the three most important of which originate at the base of the spine. The ida flows to the left nostril, the pingala flows to the right nostril, and thesushumna is the central channel and balance point of the other two.nadis

The ancient yogis were able to map out thousands of these channels, not through dissection of the body, but through intense practice of introspection and awareness development of both the gross and subtle levels of the body-mind. Current research supports the yogic observations.

The reason that nose breathing is more effective in creating energy changes is that when you breathe in or out through your nose, you stimulate the olfactory nerve; this impulse is then passed on to the hypothalamus, which is connected to the pineal gland, which is associated with the third eye area—seat of the “sat guru,” inner wisdom. Some say the ida and pingala interlace their way up the sushumna and end somewhere in the sinus chambers; others say that they end in the “third eye.” When you breathe through your nose, you are helping to open and balance the sushumna and quiet and steady the mind.

For more helpful information go to the Yoga Journal 

11 Surprising Facts About the Respiratory System

The respiratory system is made up of several organs and structures, including the lungs, windpipe, diaphragm and alveoli. It is responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon-dioxide waste.

Breathing allows you to take in the oxygen your cells need and expel carbon-dioxide waste. But when you exhale, you also breathe out a lot of water.

How much water do you lose from breathing?

When at rest, humans exhale up to 17.5 milliliters (0.59 fluid ounces) of water per hour, according to a 2012 article in the journal Polish Pneumonology and Allergology. But you lose about four times that amount when you exercise, the study said.

The average time an adult can hold his or her breath is between 30 and 60 seconds. This limitation has more to do with the buildup of blood-acidifying carbon dioxide than the lack of oxygen, which your body stores in muscle proteins called myoglobin.

But free divers — people who practice the sport of diving underwater without using equipment like scuba gear — have different techniques, such as hyperventilation, to decrease the concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood, allowing them to hold their breath for remarkably long times. Denmark’s Stig Severinsen currently holds the Guinness World Record for the longest free dive — in 2010, he held his breath underwater for 22 minutes.

Horses only breathe through their noses.

Asthma was once treated with psychotherapy

The lungs are the only organ that can float on water.

When you breathe in, our chest swells; when you breathe out, our chest collapses. But these chest movements are not actually the result of air filling up or exiting the lungs.

During inhalation, the diaphragm — a thin sheet of dome-shaped muscle that separates the chest and abdominal cavities — contracts and moves down, increasing the space in the chest cavity. At the same time, the muscles between the ribs contract to pull the rib cage upward and outward. During exhalation, the exact opposite happens.

Read more interesting facts about human and animal respiratory systems at  Live Science 

Thee Inverted Vegan Cookie

Once I saw this, I knew this is what my desert for the weekend would be. A warm inverted cookie with some fresh Vanilla Bean Ice Cream non dairy of course. 

Ingredients

1-1/4 cups packed dark brown sugar

1/2 cup canola oil

6 tablespoons vanilla soy/rice/coconut/almond milk

1/4 cup sugar

1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

2-1/4 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

3/4 teaspoon salt

1 cup dairy-free semisweet chocolate chips

1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts

  1. In a large bowl, beat the first six ingredients until well blended. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt; gradually add to sugar mixture and mix well. Stir in chocolate chips and nuts. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour.
  2. Drop by rounded tablespoonfuls 2 in. apart onto parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Bake at 375° for 10-12 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. Cool for 1 minute before removing from pans to wire racks. Yield: 3-1/2 dozen.

Side Note: If you would like your cookies to come out Inverted like the picture bake them on the opposite side of your cookie pan. 

For more delicious cookie recipes swing over to Taste of Home

Bonus: 7 Tips to making your own Vegan Ice Cream

Rare Diamond Reveals Earth’s Interior is All Wet

“It’s actually the confirmation that there is a very, very large amount of water that’s trapped in a really distinct layer in the deep Earth,” said Graham Pearson, lead study author and a geochemist at the University of Alberta in Canada. The findings were published today (March 12) in the journal Nature.dd

The worthless-looking diamond encloses a tiny piece of an olivine mineral called ringwoodite, and it’s the first time the mineral has been found on Earth’s surface in anything other than meteorites or laboratories. Ringwoodite only forms under extreme pressure, such as the crushing load about 320 miles (515 kilometers) deep in the mantle.

What’s in the mantle?

Most of Earth’s volume is mantle, the hot rock layer between the crust and the core. Too deep to drill, the mantle’s composition is a mystery leavened by two clues: meteorites, and hunks of rock heaved up by volcanoes.dd2 First, scientists think the composition of the Earth’s mantle is similar to that of meteorites called chondrites, which are chiefly made of olivine. Second, lava belched by volcanoes sometimes taps the mantle, bringing up chunks of odd minerals that hint at the intense heat and pressure olivine endures in the bowels of the Earth.

Earth’s deepest ocean

The diamond from Brazil confirms that the models are correct: Olivine is ringwoodite at this depth, a layer called the mantle transition zone. And it resolves a long-running debate about water in the mantletransition zone. The ringwoodite is 1.5 percent water, present not as a liquid but as hydroxide ions (oxygen and hydrogen molecules bound together). The results suggest there could be a vast store of water in the mantle transition zone, which stretches from 254 to 410 miles (410 to 660 km) deep.

“It translates into a very, very large mass of water, approaching the sort of mass of water that’s present in all the world’s ocean,” Pearson told Live Science’s Our Amazing Planet.

Full Article Here

 

 

Yogi Selects XI

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Good Afternoon, Today feels refreshing.. Went to sleep reading The fifth mountain last night. There was a few things I learned but the one thing I remember was what he wrote of children. ” A child can teach an adult three things, to be happy for no reason, to always be busy with something and to know how to demand with all his might that which he desires.” I have the first two down pact the third ability requires me to really want whatever it is I’m lusting for then it happens! Pick up the book by Paulo Coelho –@eyeFocus
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Cool Yoga Pose with the Fresh Kicks to Match – @amand_mar
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@andrew7sealy I don’t have blocks…but I do happen to have this awesome can of “Protein Powerhouse Raw #Sprouting Blend” that serves it’s purpose in many ways. #RawEnergy keeps#MarchMovements flowing even at 12:28 am “These are some of the things that hydrogen atoms do given 15 billion years of evolution” and it continues. Clear Intuition brings forth fruition. Continuous creation 💜😄🙌@jackdufour @patrickbeach @perns_yoga @carsonclaycalhoun@phelpshair @allthoseotherawesompeople 🙏

Know about ELF Waves?

The best way for people to understand electromagnetic waves is to think of the ocean’s waves. Some waves in the ocean are big, and some are small, size is amplitude

Some beaches have waves that come quickly and some have waves that come slowly, this is called the frequency that the waves comes. 

Researcher figured out how they could change the amplitude or the frequency of electromagnetic waves in a controlled way, and this is called amplitude modulation or frequency modulation.

Because all electromagnetic energy beams travel the same speed 3 x 10¹º cm/sec, an energy beam with a short wave must have many more of those short waves pass in a given time such as a day than a long wave. The shorter the wave the greater the frequency that a wave will arrive. While our image of an ocean is that it moves up and down in relation to the surface. 

In other words, the ocean wave moves (vibrates) up and down in relation to the surface (a mathematical plane). Electromagnetic waves vibrate in 3 dimensions (relative to 3 planes), generally they are only drawn as one-dimensional waves. Our brains operate on waves that are very low frequency (from one cycle per second) to about 50 cycles per second. A cycle per second is called a Hertz (Hz). Due to the wide range of different amplitudes and frequencies it has been more practical to induce various measuring units.

Since the late 1970s, questions have been raised whether exposure to ELF electric and magnetic fields (EMF) within this range of frequencies produces adverse health consequences.

External ELF magnetic fields induce electric fields and currents in the body which, at very high field strengths, cause nerve and muscle stimulation and changes in nerve cell excitability in the central nervous system. Health effects related to short-term, high-level exposure have been established and form the basis of two international exposure limit guidelines (ICNIRP, 1998; IEEE, 2002).

ELF at human perceivable kV/m levels is said to create an annoying tingling sensation in the areas of the body in contact with clothing, particularly the arms due to the induction of a surface charge by the ELF. 7% of volunteers described the spark discharges as painful where the subject was well-insulated and touched a grounded object within a 5 kV/m field. 50% of volunteers described a similar spark discharge as painful in a 10 kV/m field

ELF radiation can have adverse effects on the pineal gland as well, depending on the frequency of radiation. According to one source, 60 Hz is most effective at affecting the gland and suppressing melatonin production. This frequency is the frequency of standard US electrical currentScreen shot 2014-03-15 at 6.07.07 AM

If you are interested in Electromagnetic waves and how they effect you Read more at Deeper Insights

 

How to find water in the Desert!

You may be saying to yourself what would I ever be doing in a desert.  Hey life has a way of making you eat the words you put out. So if your going to eat those words you should atleast have some water to do so with in the desert.

Deserts are areas that receive less than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation a year. They are hot and dry during the day and cold at night. The most important thing you need in a desert is water. Here are ways to find it.

Look for wildlife, like birds in a tree, or insects (especially flies, mosquitoes).Wherever there is wildlife, there is probably a source of water nearby.redtailedhawk

  • Sometimes birds circle over water.
  • Bees fly in a straight line to and from water up to 1,000 meters away.[1]

Dig in dry stream or river beds and/or near vegetation. If the soil is damp just under the surface, keep digging a hole until water seeps into it. Use your hand to drink it, or soak it up with fabric and wring the water into your mouth. Or, if you’re prepared, follow the steps in How to Make Water in the Desert.46771888

  • Cottonwoods, willows, sycamores, hackberry and cattails are likely to be near groundwater.[2]
  • The more familiar you are with the vegetation in the desert you’re in, the better your chances of finding water.

Look for water around and under rocks, which slow evaporation. Be sure to check for scorpions first as they are also lurking under rocks.670px-Find-Water-in-the-Desert-Step-3

Look for dew. Gather dew drops on vegetation before sunrise by soaking them with a clothing article and squeeze it into a container, or straight into your mouth. Another way to get dew drops is to turn over half-buried rocks. The coolness of the rock’s surface can collect several dew drops.

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  • Turn over half-buried stones in the desert just before dawn and dew will form on their surface.[1]

 

Search for cacti. Be careful, though, as some cacti are poisonous. If you cut it open and the cacti has a milky colored liquid in it, it’s poisonous. If not, it is probably really cool water, be sure to look for that type. See How to Test if a Plant Is Edible.Desert_Cactus_Wallpaper__yvt2

  • The prickly pear cactus is an great example of a cactus that is safe to eat and contains a lot of moisture.
  • Be careful of the barrel cactus out there. Some are poisonous.

 

Wiki-How Source

 

 

Swim with the Jellyfish

Ten million jellyfish swim from one side of the lake to the other as they follow the sun in the popular snorkeling destination called Jellyfish Lake.

A unique migration occurs every day in a saltwater lake on Eil Malk Island, a part of the uninhabited Rock Islands of Palau in the Western Pacific Ocean, and diver Nadia Aly found herself smack-dab in the middle of it. CATERS_JELLYFISH_LAKE_10-1024x682Jellyfish Lake is a landlocked saltwater lake that was formed 12,000 years ago. It is connected to the ocean through fissures and tunnels in the limestone of an ancient reef. As the jellyfish evolved in the algae-rich lake, they lost their sting, allowing for snorkelers to swim through clouds of moon and golden jellyfish without the fear of getting stung.

According to PBS, the jellyfish have eight primitive eyes and algae that live within their cells and migrate twice a day to get sunlight to their internal algae so that the algae can grow.CATERS_JELLYFISH_LAKE_04-1024x682                                                 At night they swim to a lower depth, return to the over side of the lake, and start over the next day. Aly spent a total of eight hours in the waters of Jellyfish Lake, capturing several stunning photographs, including a selfie.

“I shot thousands of photos over the few days I was there,” she told MailOnline. “The time of day and location of the sun are the two factors that really make or break the shoot.”CATERS_JELLYFISH_LAKE_02-1024x682                                         Jellyfish Lake is popular with snorkelers since the jellyfish have lost their sting over time with absence of many predators

See more amazing photos of the Jellyfish Here 

 

Why are we allergic to pollen?

When pollen spores dislodge from the plant and become airborne, they can enter your nose and throat. In people who are allergic, pollen triggers a reaction in specialized cells known as mast cells. A mast cell or mastocyte contains histamine, which is released into the bloodstream during an allergic reaction. This causes many of the symptoms associated with pollen allergies — such as runny eyes and nose, nasal congestion, sinus pressure, and itching and irritation.

Allergies are sensitivities to certain substances—including foods, dust, animal dander and pollen— that people come in contact with nearly every day. In normal people, such contact has no ill effects. The bodies of allergic people, however, are sensitive to these substances

Individuals tend to inherit the tendency to have allergies from one or both parents. Though specific allergies, such as a pollen allergy, cannot be inherited, the likelihood of having the same or similar reaction is increased.

Pregnancy, viral infections and puberty can also increase the probability of developing allergies because the body’s defenses and immune system are weakened at these times.

Read more @ Ehow Facts