Category Archives: Art

Daily Focus 052

Live from the red light district. This one is a light train of thought. Similar to the lights after having just the right amount to drink when the ambiance of wind and random music lull you to paradise type of light. Theres secret sauce in your handwriting. If you didn’t know now you do, listen in on the chef. We discuss two sound bathing type experience from Jamaica and Costa Rica. The movie review of today is Just Mercy starring Michael B Jordan & Jamie Foxx.

 Quotes Of The Day  

Love is the triumph of imagination over intelligence

If you wish to drown do not torture yourself with shallow water

Genuine love is nothing but the attempt to exchange two solitudes

I can’t mate in captivity

Deity Darkness in India

India is the most diversified country in the world. With 29 states and a population of 1.2 billion living in these states, the culture and traditions are followed by 9 religions.

But, there’s one thing in common. Every God or Goddess has been portrayed  to us as White Skinned when majorly the population has a darker tone.

And thus, these Chennai based photographers- Naresh Nil and Bhardwaj Sundar, break all the stereotypes and re-create the same image of Gods with a dark tone in their beautiful photographs.

Divinity has many forms, and colours have been used in various ways to depict the Divine. The jury is out, but in common culture, we still find godliness being depicted through ‘white’ or ‘fair’ skin, right from the small photo of God in the neighborhood store, to the big framed photo hanging inside a house.

By depicting Gods we revere as dark-skinned, this initiative aims to celebrate a different view of their divinity, serenity and all pervasive beauty by going beyond perceptions.

1. Goddess Lakshmi

2. Goddess Durga

3. Goddess Saraswati

4. Lord Shiva

5. Lord Krishna

6. Bala Murugan, form of Lord Subrahmanya

Read the full article and see more art work at buddybits

Guggenheim Tulum’s Treehouse

The brainchild of Peggy Guggenheim’s great-grandson, IK Lab’s new seaside gallery features curved walls like the NYC original—and a few other surprising features

Before you enter IK Lab, a new arts and cultural space in the heart of Tulum, you must first take off your shoes. Part of the experience, according to its designer Jorge Eduardo Neira Sterkel, is through your feet, which alternately pass over carpets of curving jungle vines and polished cement. And proceed with caution: The floor occasionally slopes unexpectedly.

“If you don’t pay attention, you’ll fall,” says Sterkel, explaining how an uneven floor is a humbling attitude adjustment. “You have to lose control to pay attention to what you feel, emotionally and spiritually.”

The Argentine native, a former painter with no formal architectural background, constructed the curvaceous, womblike IK Lab on the site of his eco-conscious resort Azulik (a portmanteau of the Spanish word for “blue” and the Mayan word for “wind”) with a deep reverence for Mother Nature: No trees were cut, and the amorphous structure sits on stilts so that local wildlife can still pass below. Light permeates both the walls of vines reinforced by transparent fiberglass and the grand, misshapen portico doors—all of which normally spells disaster for showing art.

“This is the counter model of the standard gallery,” says IK Lab director Santiago Rumney Guggenheim, since curators typically prefer the reliable blank canvas of straight white walls. But when Rumney Guggenheim moved to Tulum in January (having grown up in Paris and lived in New York, where he temporarily had a gallery of his own), he immediately proposed that Sterkel turn the site into a gallery.

“When I walked into the space, it reminded me that in 1948, Peggy [Guggenheim, his great-grandmother] had opened a gallery in New York called Art of This Century, and the walls were curved,” he says. (The family legacy of difficult architecture also includes the curving walls of the Frank Lloyd Wright’s New York building, for starters, or the cavernous, billowing ones of Frank Gehry’s Bilbao). “I saw it as a challenge,” he adds. “You have to rethink how you’re going to put together a show.”

On Friday, IK Lab opens its first exhibition: “Alignments,” in which Rumney Guggenheim makes use of the unusual space by hanging nearly-ten-foot-long sculptures by Artur Lescher from the cavernous ceiling and illuminating neon works by Margo Trushina. In an adjacent 39-foot-high dome, Tatiana Trouvée’s 250 Points Towards Infinity comprises suspended pendulums pointing at 250 different points on the ground.

Beyond this inaugural show, the duo’s vision is farther reaching, including art programs for local children, and a multidisciplinary residency for aspiring artists, fashion designers, chefs, musicians, and more now under construction off-site deep in the jungle. “The artist will be developing his or her work as a resident taking in consideration and being affected by what’s happening around them, walking barefoot, touching different textures and exchanging ideas,” says Sterkel, who calls Tulum “a Mayan paradise.”

“They’ll make a playful space of creativity and sharing and playful and everyone is learning,” he adds. “This is my dream there.”

Pixar’s Online Story Telling Course

In one of the best examples of free education this year, Pixar has released a six-part online course called ‘The Art of Storytelling’. 

Written by DEREK BERES

Humans tell stories. Many of us live interesting lives; developing a way to deliver the narrative is to our advantage. Others lead less than adventurous existences, and so stories become transcendent vehicles for our imagination. Epic mythologies and religions are nothing but collections of stories that inspire and transform us.

The ways we tell stories is always changing. Oral cultures evolved into literary cultures. Theater is an ancient art. Movies offered a visual way to tell stories that painting and photography never could, even if those pictures were worth thousands of words.

One of the greatest and most popular storytelling machines of today, Pixar, is celebrating, as well as helping evolve, the story with its new initiative, The Art of Storytelling. This free online program is for children and adults who want to wrap their head around what it takes to produce stories ready for the screen.

Peter Docter kicks off the series discussing the art of telling a good story. As director of Monsters, Inc., Inside Out, and Up, he’s directly responsible for some of Pixar’s biggest hits. At first glance his advice seems rather benign: write about what you know.

Our imaginations are wild. Docter says if you envision car chases, monsters, and explosions, use them, but in a context that’s connectable with others. He uses Monsters Inc. as an example. The first drafts were failures—and each film can take thirty or more drafts. The problem was that the movie was about a monster that scares kids.

The film needed an emotional hook. As Docter was learning how to become a father at that time, the movie became about a monster raising a child. The storyline was universal; the audience was able to connect more. And what’s the point of telling a story other than to relate to others?

Not all stories are so simple. Movies can be propaganda and exploitative as well. The Pixar team in this program focuses on relatability in six parts:

We Are All Storytellers

Character

Structure

Visual Language

Filmmaking grammar

Storyboarding

Valeria LaPointe, a Pixar story artist, reminds watchers that the process—editing, debating, collaborating, refining—is what makes a movie watchable. A series of activities offers students of this program an opportunity to flex their imaginations in such a way. These include the ability to express a memory in a way that excites the listener, identifying your three ‘desert island’ movies and finding the connective tissue binding them together, and understanding what draws you to your favorite film characters.

In partnership with the Khan Academy, Pixar will be releasing similar free programs throughout the year. Next up is an installment on character creation. There’s a reason Pixar has been so successful. Revealing its secrets in order to inspire others to create—and perhaps one day become the type of artist the company recruits—is one of the best uses of free online education this year. 

Here’s Lawrence Levy, former CFO of Pixar, on productivity and mindfulness:

Derek’s next book, Whole Motion: Training Your Brain and Body For Optimal Health, will be published on 7/4/17 by Carrel/Skyhorse Publishing.

He is based in Los Angeles. Stay in touch on Facebook and Twitter.

Transformations of Self Love

Who do we really know? Is it surface deep? Are we quicker to enter and be entered physically than to allow that same entrance to be walked through mentally in the form of questions. Answers that can reveal truths of yourself that don’t want to be seen quite yet. How does one confront part of themselves that even they don’t comprehend? Not knowing why you are who you are can be nerve racking but aren’t we changing everyday? Its rare I wake up the same person I fell asleep as. Its all observation of self. Watching, listening and learning can be transformative. We attract who can relate to our pain unknowingly.  We communicate hand in hand with one foot in front of the next searching to find if we have more in common than curious eyes.

 

 

Kim Jung Gi How to Become A Master

Kim Jung Gi is famous for his large brush pen drawings from his imagination. I had special access to record a live demonstration and a private interview with the man himself. In this video I’ll explore why Kim Jung Gi is so damn good

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Related videos:

Kim Jung Gi Sketchbook Tour: https://youtu.be/OmLkBQmZQM8 12 DAYS OF PROKO (Quicksketch Edition) https://www.proko.com/12days

Day 2 – Getting Better Faster: https://youtu.be/GknVZeFJ2Ug

Day 3 – Sketching with Ink from Imagination: https://youtu.be/80yhjO8yLeE
Day 4 – Quickly Draw Heads – Loomis Part 1: https://youtu.be/wAOldLWIDSM
Day 5 – Draw ANY Head Type – Loomis Part 2: https://youtu.be/JC2ZppKHCq
Day 6 – Intuitive Portraits – Loomis Part 3: https://youtu.be/P9LOUHmPhS8
Day 7 – Meditation for Artists: https://youtu.be/MJYGFwGhHnA Day 8 – Improve Your Sketching Speed: https://youtu.be/tSdAFmIFtfo
Day 9 – Painting Challenge: https://youtu.be/98Sma9WAtM8
Day 10 – The FORCE Method: https://youtu.be/JtaBjtAGsk0
Day 11 – Draw Using Reilly Rhythms: https://youtu.be/StRohW0Og3w

Day 12 – Speed Sculpting: https://youtu.be/H4WtpO8vfTU Watch More Proko: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Var9…

The History of Spiritual Jazz: Hear a Transcendent 12-Hour Mix

 

“During the tumultuous ’60s, there was a religious revolution to accompany the grand societal, sexual, racial, and cultural shifts already afoot,” writes Pitchfork’s Andy Beta. “Concurrently, the era’s primary African-American art form reflected such upheaval in its music, too: Jazz began to push against all constraints, be it chord changes, predetermined tempos, or melodies, so as to best reflect the pursuit of freedom in all of its forms.”

This culminated in John Coltrane’s masterpiece A Love Supreme, which opened the gates for other jazz players seeking the transcendent, using everything from “the sacred sound of the Southern Baptist church in all its ecstatic shouts and yells” to “enlightenment from Southeastern Asian esoteric practices like transcendental meditation and yoga.”

It goes without saying that you can’t talk about spiritual jazz without talking about John Coltrane. Nor can you ignore the distinctive music and theology of Herman Poole Blount, better known as Sun Ra, composer, bandleader, music therapistAfrofuturist, and teacher of a course called “The Black Man in the Cosmos.” NTS’ expansive mix offers work from both of them and other familiar artists like Alice Coltrane, Earth, Wind & Fire, Herbie Hancock, Gil Scott-Heron, Ornette Coleman, and many more (including players from as far away from the birthplace of jazz as Japan) who, whether or not you’ve heard of them before, can take you to places you’ve never been before. Start listening with the embedded first part of the playlist above; continue on to parts twothree, and four, and maybe — just maybe — you’ll come out of it wanting to found a church of your own.

 

Related Content:

John Coltrane’s Handwritten Outline for His Masterpiece A Love Supreme

Discover the Church of St. John Coltrane, Founded on the Divine Music of A Love Supreme

Sun Ra’s Full Lecture & Reading List From His 1971 UC Berkeley Course, “The Black Man in the Cosmos”

Sun Ra Plays a Music Therapy Gig at a Mental Hospital; Inspires Patient to Talk for the First Time in Years

The Cry of Jazz: 1958’s Highly Controversial Film on Jazz & Race in America (With Music by Sun Ra)

Space Jazz, a Sonic Sci-Fi Opera by L. Ron Hubbard, Featuring Chick Corea (1983)

A Huge Anthology of Noise & Electronic Music (1920-2007) Featuring John Cage, Sun Ra, Captain Beefheart & More

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities and culture. He’s at work on a book about Los Angeles, A Los Angeles Primer, the video series The City in Cinema, the crowdfunded journalism project Where Is the City of the Future?, and the Los Angeles Review of Books’ Korea Blog. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.