Category Archives: Grow

Hemp Batteries Could Become A Reality

Researchers have found a way to boost the energy density of supercapacitors through the use of more sophisticated electrodes. These electrodes are composed of hemp fibers, and they have a high energy storage capacity.

The development breakthrough has been made by a Canadian start-up company, led by Dr. David Mitlin. The idea arose from some applied thinking, when Mitlin’s group decided to see if they could make graphene-like carbons from hemp bast fibers.

From Mitlin’s research, it seems that hemp fibers can hold as much energy and power as graphene, the current favored material for supercapacitors. Supercapacitors are energy storage devices that have huge potential to transform the way future electronics are powered. Unlike batteries, which store energy chemically in the material of their electrodes, a capacitor stores energy physically, on the electrodes’ surfaces.

Mitlin’s group discovered that when hemp fibers were heated for 24 hours at a little over 350 degrees Fahrenheit this would exfoliated the material into carbon nanosheets. From the reformed material, the group constructed supercapacitors using the hemp-derived carbons as electrodes and an ionic liquid as the electrolyte. In tests, the devices performed far better than commercial supercapacitors. This was assessed by examining for energy density and across a range of temperatures. The hemp-based devices yielded energy densities as high as 12 Watt-hours per kilogram, which is two to three times higher than currently available commercial systems.

Interviewed by Phys.Org, Mitlin expands on the success so far: “Our device’s electrochemical performance is on par with or better than graphene-based devices. The key advantage is that our electrodes are made from biowaste using a simple process, and therefore, are much cheaper than graphene.”

The parallels with graphene are a reference to the considerable research that has gone into to new variant of carbon. Graphene is a single-layer mesh of carbon atoms. Graphene is considered the new “wonder material,” due its durability and lightness. Graphene can be described as a one-atom thick layer of graphite.

Mitlin’s new research could trigger the electronic industry to move in a new direction. The research group are currently preparing the hemp-based prototype supercapacitor for small-scale manufacturing.

– Article originally posted on DigitalJournal.com

 

Kilindi Iyi – High-Dose Mushrooms Beyond the Threshold

 

Kilindi Iyi is the Head Instructor and Technical Advisor of the Tamerrian Martial Art Institute. He is a mycologist, teacher and world traveler who has presented on the subject of high-dose psilocybin from the US to Norway to Australia.

Filmed at Breaking Convention: The 2nd multidisciplinary convention on psychedelic consciousness, University of Greenwich – 12th-14th July 2013 – breakingconvention.co.uk

Fruit History: The Pineapple

The History of Pineapple

Its origin
Historians believe that the pineapple originated in Brazil in South America. It was imported to Europe later. It is also believed that Christopher Columbus and his crew members were probably the first few people from the European continent to have tasted the fruit.

They imported the fruit and cultivated it in hot houses. Members of European royal families soon developed a liking for it. It gradually became available to the rich, the noble and the elite.

James Dole did a lot to popularize the fruit and make it affordable with his pineapple
plantations in Hawaii, his goal was to have the convenient canned pineapple in every
grocery store in the country.

Origin of the Word
The word pineapple in English was first recorded in 1398, when it was originally used to describe the reproductive organs of conifer trees (now termed pine cones). When European explorers discovered this tropical fruit they called them pineapples (term first recorded in that sense in 1664) because of their resemblance to what is now known as the pine cone. The term pine cone was first recorded in 1694, and was used to replace the original meaning of pineapple

In most of the world the fruit is known by the name. Ananas,
which is the word from the Brazilian Tupi Indians that means
“Excellent Fruit “

Southeast Asia now produces the majority of the world’s pineapples..

You can’t use pineapple in jello because its bromelain content stops it from jelling

One of the ways you tell if a pineapple is ripe is by smelling it.

The bromelain in pineapple is used as a meat tenderizer.

Bromelain is an extract derived from the stems of pineapples, although it exists in all parts of the fresh plant and fruit, which has many uses. The extract has a history of folk and modern medicinal use. As a supplement, it is thought to have anti-inflammatory effects. Bromelain also contains chemicals that might interfere with the growth of tumor cells and slow blood clotting, but no peer-reviewed research shows any efficacy against tumors. As a culinary ingredient, it is used primarily as a tenderizer.

Source: TheKitchenProject 

Medicinal Properties of The Rose

Unlike Western medicine, all indigenous cultures believe that there is no separation between the physical and the mental or spiritual being, and both must be assessed before healing occurs. The same belief has long been held true regarding the rose and is seen in this saying, “Roses are good for the skin and the soul”

he botanical name of the Wild Rose is reflected in its use by the Romans. R. canina species was used for rabid dog bites.

Roses continued as official medicine until well into the 1930s (British Pharmacopoeia) when the tincture of the Apothocary’s Rose was prescribed for sore throats. Roses were also widely used as mild astringents and to flavor other medicines.

There were dozens of varieties of roses in North America. The Native Americans learned how to use whatever grew in their region, as a medicine and, in cases of emergency, as a food. The leaves, petals, hips, and roots were widely used for a variety of conditions, including colds, fevers, diarrhea, influenza, and stomach troubles.

The Omahas steeped the hips or roots to make a wash to treat eye inflammations.

In the Great Lakes region, the Chippewas made a tea from the wild rose and used the berries for food and for diseases of the eye. They used the inner bark of the roots to treat cataracts.

The Pawnees collected the insect galls from the lower parts of the stems, and charred and crushed them for use in dressings for burns. The insect or disease-produced galls were found in the archaeological remains of the Hill Site, near present-day Guide Rock, Nebraska, which was occupied by the Pawnees in the early 1800s.

The Flathead and Cheyenne tribes treated snow blindness with an eyewash made by boiling the petals, stem bark, or root bark. The Cheyenne also boiled the inner bark to make a tea valued for treating diarrhea and stomach trouble.

Many other tribes used all parts of the plant for various remedies. The Crows boiled the crushed roots and used them in hot compresses to reduce swellings. They also sniffed vapor to stop bleedings from the nose or mouth.

The Arapahos used the seeds to produce a drawing effect for muscular pain.

Key Actions

  • antidepressant
  • antispasmodic
  • aphrodisiac
  • astringent
  • antibacterial
  • antiviral
  • antiseptic
  • anti-inflammatory
  • blood tonic
  • cleansing
  • digestive stimulant
  • expectorant
  • increases bile production
  • kidney tonic
  • menstrual regulator

Read the Full Article At CloverLeafFarmHerbs

Raised Garden Bed Construction

Raised Garden Bed Construction:
gardenbed
In addition to wood, other materials such as stone, concrete, cinder blocks, galvanized culverts, stock tanks, Cor-Ten steel and pre-manufactured raised bed products may be used.

If using timber, ensure that it is an untreated hardwood to prevent the risk of chemicals leaching into the soil. Pine that was treated using chromated copper arsenate, or CCA, contains a toxic chemical mix for preserving timber which can be drawn up into the plants and eat part or all of the plant. A common approach is to use timber sleepers joined with steel rods to hold them together.

A great how to video can be watched here  on Youtube 

Hemp Myths vs Realities

Botanically, the genus Cannabis is composed of several variants.Although there has been a long-standing debate among taxonomists about how to classify these variants into species, applied plant breeders generally embrace a biochemical method to classify variants along utilitarian lines. Cannabis is the only plant genus that contains the unique class of molecular compounds called cannabinoids. Many cannabinoids have been identified, but two preponderate: THC, which is the psychoactive ingredient of Cannabis, and CBD, which is an antipsychoactive ingredient.

 

One type of Cannabis is high in the psychoactive cannabinoid, THC, and low in the antipsychoactive cannabinoid, CBD. This type is popularly known as marijuana. Another type is high in CBD and low in THC. Variants of this type are called industrial hemp.

In the United States, the debate about the relationship between hemp and marijuana has been diminished by the dissemination of many statements that have little scientific support. This report examines in detail ten of the most pervasive and pernicious of these myths.

Myth: United States law has always treated hemp and marijuana the same.

Reality: The history of federal drug laws clearly shows that at one time the U.S. government understood and accepted the distinction between hemp and marijuana.
Myth: Smoking industrial hemp gets a person high.

Reality: The THC levels in industrial hemp are so low that no one could get high from smoking it. Moreover, hemp contains a relatively high percentage of another cannabinoid, CBD, that actually blocks the marijuana high. Hemp, it turns out, is not only not marijuana; it could be called “antimarijuana.”
Myth: Even though THC levels are low in hemp, the THC can be extracted and concentrated to produce a powerful drug.

Reality: Extracting THC from industrial hemp and further refining it to eliminate the preponderance of CBD would require such an expensive, hazardous, and time-consuming process that it is extremely unlikely anyone would ever attempt it, rather than simply obtaining high-THC marijuana instead.
Myth: Hemp fields would be used to hide marijuana plants.

Reality: Hemp is grown quite differently from marijuana. Moreover, it is harvested at a different time than marijuana. Finally, cross-pollination between hemp plants and marijuana plants would significantly reduce the potency of the marijuana plant.
Myth: Legalizing hemp while continuing the prohibition on marijuana would burden local police forces.

Reality: In countries where hemp is grown as an agricultural crop, the police have experienced no such burdens.
Myth: Feral hemp must be eradicated because it can be sold as marijuana.

Reality: Feral hemp, or ditchweed, is a remnant of the hemp once grown on more than 400,000 acres by U.S. farmers. It contains extremely low levels of THC, as low as .05 percent. It has no drug value, but does offer important environmental benefits as a nesting habitat for birds. About 99 percent of the “marijuana” being eradicated by the federal government-at great public expense-is this harmless ditchweed. Might it be that the drug enforcement agencies want to convince us that ditchweed is hemp in order to protect their large eradication budgets?
Myth: Those who want to legalize hemp are actually seeking a backdoor way to legalize marijuana.

Reality: It is true that many of the first hemp stores were started by industrial-hemp advocates who were also in favor of legalizing marijuana. However, as the hemp industry has matured, it has come to be dominated by those who see hemp as the agricultural and industrial crop that it is, and see hemp legalization as a different issue than marijuana legalization. In any case, should we oppose a very good idea simply because some of those who support it also support other ideas with which we disagree?
Myth: Hemp oil is a source of THC.

Reality: Hemp oil is an increasingly popular product, used for an expanding variety of purposes. The washed hemp seed contains no THC at all. The tiny amounts of THC contained in industrial hemp are in the glands of the plant itself. Sometimes, in the manufacturing process, some THC- and CBD-containing resin sticks to the seed, resulting in traces of THC in the oil that is produced. The concentration of these cannabinoids in the oil is infinitesimal. No one can get high from using hemp oil.

Read the full list of Myth Vs Realities at HEMPTRADERS

 

hemp

How to Grow a Pineapple

Part 1 of 3: Getting the Pineapple Ready

  1. Grow a Pineapple Step 1.jpg

    Pick out a fresh pineapple. Look for one with firm, green leaves that have not turned yellow or brown. The skin on the fruit should be golden brown and firm to the touch. Smell the pineapple to see if it’s ripe: it should emit sweet, heady smell indicating that you’ve chosen it at just the right time to start a new pineapple plant.

    • Make sure the pineapple isn’t underripe. It needs to be ripe in order to produce another pineapple.
    • Check to make sure the pineapple isn’t too ripe by tugging a little at the leaves. If they come right off, the pineapple is too ripe to plant.
    • Make sure the pineapple doesn’t have scale insects around the base of the leaves. They look like small grayish spots.
  2. Twist the leaves off the top of the pineapple. Grasp the body of the pineapple with one hand and use the other to grab the leaves at the base and twist them off. This method ensures that the base of the leaves will stay intact. It will be attached to a minimum amount of fruit, which you don’t need in order for the plant to grow.

    • If you’re having trouble twisting off the top, you can slice off the top of the pineapple. Slice off the excess fruit around the root.
    • Make sure the base, the very tip of the area where the leaves join together, stays intact. New roots will be sprouting from this, and without it the plant won’t grow.
  3. Strip off some of the lower leaves to expose the stem. This helps the stem sprout roots once it is planted. Strip until a few inches of the stem are exposed. Cut away any remaining fruit without damaging the stem.

  4. Grow a Pineapple Step 3.jpg

    Turn it upside down and let it dry for a week. The scars where you made a cut and removed the leaves will harden, which is necessary before you take the next step.

Part 2 of 3: Soaking the Pineapple Crown

  1. Fill a large glass with water. The mouth of the glass should be large enough to fit the pineapple crown inside, but small enough so that you can prop it up to keep it from getting completely submerged.

  2. Stick a few toothpicks into the pineapple crown. Place them across from each other near the top of the stem. Push them in just far enough so that they’ll stay in place. These toothpicks are used to suspend the pineapple crown in the glass of water.

  3. Put the crown in the water. The toothpicks should rest on the rim of the glass. The stem should be submerged in the water, and the leaves should stick out the top.

  4. Grow a Pineapple Step 4.jpg

    Place the glass in a sunny window and wait for the roots to sprout. It should take several days or up to a few weeks for white roots to poke out and begin to grow.

    • Keep the plant away from extreme temperatures. Don’t let it get too hot or too cold.
    • Change out the water every few days to prevent the growth of mold.

Part 3 of 3: Planting the Pineapple Crown

  1. Prepare a pot of soil for the crown. Fill a 6-inch pot with light garden soil that has a 30% blend of organic matter. This has the right blend of nutrients for the pineapple plant.

  2. Grow a Pineapple Step 5.jpg

    Plant the pineapple crown in the pot. Plant the crown when the roots are a few inches long. Wait until they’ve gotten long enough to take root in soil. If you plant the crown too early it won’t do well. Press the soil firmly around the base of the crown without getting any soil on the leaves.

  3. Grow a Pineapple Step 6.jpg

    Keep the plant moist and warm. It needs a sunny, warm and humid environment where the night temperatures won’t drop below 65ºF (18ºC). If conditions are dry, mist the plant regularly.

    • You can keep the pot outside if you live in a warm climate. If you have cool winters take it indoors during the winter season and keep it in a sunny window. It’s important for the plant to get a lot of sun all year round.
  4. Grow a Pineapple Step 8.jpg
    Grow a Pineapple Step 7.jpg

    Give the plant food and water. Water the soil lightly once a week. Fertilize the plant with half-strength fertilizer twice a month during the summer.

  5. Grow a Pineapple Step 9.jpg

    Look for flowers. It can take several years, but eventually a red cone should appear from the center of the leaves, followed by blue flowers and eventually a fruit. It takes about six months for the fruit to fully develop. The pineapple will grow from the flower, above ground, in the center of the plant.