Category Archives: Recipes

Jolllof Rice w. Yewande Komolafe

“We don’t say a dish is spicy — we say it has pepper.” Yewande Komolafe is a recipe writer who grew up in Lagos and found herself searching for the heat and flavor of Nigerian food in the U.S. She picked the 10 essential Nigerian recipes, and this jollof rice was No. 1. It’s smoky and has a spicy kick. Get the jollof rice recipe: http://nyti.ms/2IWv15R Yewande’s 10 Essential Nigerian Recipes: https://nyti.ms/2Jc3gFf Photo Credits: Photography by Johnny Miller Food styling by Rebecca Jurkevich Prop styling by Paige Hicks —————————————— SUBSCRIBE: https://bit.ly/2MrEFxh INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/2DqJMuD FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/2MrTjEC TWITTER: http://bit.ly/2RZB6ng PINTEREST: http://bit.ly/2W44xng About NYT Cooking: All the food that’s fit to eat (yes, it’s an official New York Times production).

Making Mushrooms Meaty

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Haitian Beef and Pumpkin Soup (Soup Joumou)

Haiti became free on January 1, 1804, and on that day it acquired a new name too. Previously called Saint-Domingue, the territory had been France’s most profitable colony, its plantation economy dependent on a brutal system of slave labor. Following an insurrection that grew to a full-fledged revolution, Haitian slaves and gens de couleur libres—free people of color—defeated the French military and declared for themselves a republic. The new name was also an old one: Haiti (in Haitian Creole, Ayiti) came from the indigenous Taino word for the region. It means “land of the mountains.”

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After freedom, it was time to celebrate. And to eat—at least, according to the legend surrounding the origins of soup joumou, a pumpkin soup that swiftly came to symbolize Haitian independence. The dish is the subject of a forthcoming documentary, “Liberty in a Soup,” by the filmmaker Dudley Alexis, who traveled to Haiti to dig into its history. “There’s no written account,” Alexis told me. “But the story behind it is, blacks and slaves were not allowed to drink the soup.” It was a delicacy—something reserved for French slave masters. When Haitians threw out the French, they vested this previously forbidden food with new meaning. “The soup became a symbol of Haitian independence and freedom,” Alexis said. (It may have been Marie-Claire Heureuse, the wife of the revolutionary leader Jean-Jacques Dessalines’s wife, who initiated the tradition.)

“Soup joumou is everything. For Haitians, it really is our freedom soup,” said Nadege Fleurimond, who runs a catering business in New York. The soup is a tradition in Haiti and across the diaspora. “If you speak to a Haitian in Paris or a Haitian in the Bahamas, the soup is going to come up if it’s January 1. Even if you don’t make it, you’re trying to find who made it so you can go eat it.”

The other day, in the kitchen of my apartment, Fleurimond was rinsing pieces of beef with vinegar and water, preparing to make soup joumou. She drained the beef and squeezed lime juice over it. The recipe is eclectic and variable—rich with beef and bone marrow, bitter with turnip, starchy with potato, thickened with noodles, spiced with cloves and Scotch bonnet pepper. (This is about a quarter of the ingredient list.) In my opinion it is the perfect marriage of pumpkin soup and beef stew, leaning slightly in the direction of the latter. Far from dominant, the pureed pumpkin gives the soup a slightly sweet, vegetal backbone.

Substitutions are possible, Fleurimond said. Do you lack access to joumou—the Haitian Creole word for calabaza squash? Use butternut instead. No Scotch bonnet? Habanero works. Fleurimond told me her flexible approach to cooking reflects the influence of her father, who brought Fleurimond from Haiti to Brooklyn when she was seven years old. “He always said that his measurement of a good cook was, you should be able to create no matter what is in your cupboard,” she said.

When Fleurimond graduated from college—Columbia University, political science, 2003—she expected she’d continue on to law school. And when she started catering full-time soon after, she kept law school on her mind, studying each year for the LSATs. “Coming from an immigrant household, you don’t think of catering and food as professions,” she said. “The expectation is, you’re going to be a doctor, or you’re going to be a lawyer. That’s what your parents expect from you.” By 2013, though, it became clear there was a reason Fleurimond had been putting off making the next steps toward the law—she’d rather be cooking. “I was like, ‘You know what, Nadege, you’re not going to law school,” she said. “‘Just give it up.'”

Nowadays Fleurimond is a caterer but also a kind of food impresario, hosting events like a brunch series that features talks from prominent Haitian-Americans. She founded Haiti Global Village to help rebuilding efforts in Haiti following Hurricane Matthew, and in 2014 published a cookbook/travelogue called Haiti Uncovered: A Regional Adventure Into the Art of Haitian Cuisine. “I do food, but I’ve always been big on the conversation that surrounds food,” Fleurimond said. “Writing my book was about that—to get the Haitian person to understand a little bit more deeply our heritage. But it was for the non-Haitian person to also pick up this book and be like, ‘Oh, I didn’t know this.'”

pHaitian epis is a confetticolored building block of flavor.p
Haitian epis is a confetti-colored building block of flavor.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Jennifer Ophir

In the kitchen, the first step was to make Haitian epis, a sort of all-purpose flavor base like sofrito or mirepoix. Into the food processor went onions, garlic, parsley, each color of bell pepper, oil, and a few leaves of basil. Blended, the mixture looked like confetti, and after she took it out of the processor Fleurimond coated the chunks of beef with it, setting the meat aside to marinate while she and I created a mountain of chopped vegetables on the countertop.

After stewing the beef and chunks of pumpkin together in broth, we removed the pumpkin, pureed it, and added it back in, and then the rest of the vegetables. (Soup joumou is almost universally described as a “pumpkin” soup, though calabaza is a squash; it’s a sticky subject.) You could smell what was on the stove from the foyer of the building. While the soup cooked, Fleurimond talked about what it means—that is, what freedom means for Haitians, freedom that is the result of the only successful large-scale slave rebellion, a first domino in the eventual cascading of the Atlantic slave trade. “It’s our ‘but,'” Fleurimond said. “It’s like, we may be poor, but we’re the first black republic. We may be suffering but we’re children of revolutionaries.”

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Haiti, Fleurimond said, has “been dealt a pretty bad hand.” Its status as a free black republic left it isolated in a region where slavery fueled economic progress, including in the United States. “When the rest of the world was enslaving black people, you have one black republic telling slaves all over the world, ‘You can be free too.’ They’re not going to look too kindly on that,” Fleurimond said. The U.S. didn’t recognize Haiti as a country until 1862, nearly 60 years after its revolution.

The country literally paid a price for its freedom: in 1825, French warships approached the Haitian coast and demanded compensation for Haiti’s gains, which were France’s loss—a ransom equal to ten times the young nation’s annual revenues. Faced with the threat of invasion, and the return of slavery, Haiti agreed to pay. Though it was a lesser amount than was originally demanded, the debt hobbled the brand-new country; at a certain point loan repayments took up 80 percent of Haiti’s annual budget. (These days, that France should itself repay this illegitimate bounty remains an open political demand.) Haiti continues to deal with the effects of that debt and various other economic disasters, compounded by natural disasters.

Fleurimond was thinking about putting together a Haiti Global Village event on January 1 but wasn’t sure she could plan it in time. In fact she wasn’t sure what she would be doing on New Year’s Day, though it seems likely that soup joumou will be involved. As we sat down in front of a couple fragrant bowls, I asked if the soup should be served with bread. Yes, she said: “That’s the thing we always joke about Haitian cuisine—people want to pile on as much starch as possible. It needs to hold you over, you know?”

Coquito 101

Coquito is a creamy rum and coconut punch from Puerto Rico. It’s frequently described as Puerto Rican eggnog, but this feels like a disservice both to coquito, which is unabashedly tropical with its coconut and rum, and to eggnog, which is fine and all if it’s your thing, but tends to conjure up images of curdled eggs and the woolly coating that stays on your teeth if you drink a too-sweet alcoholic beverage and then don’t practice proper dental hygiene until the next morning. (No? Just me?)

I first made coquito in December 2014, when visiting my parents, who lived in Puerto Rico at the time. After looking through a few recipes, I settled on one from Alejandra Ramos’s blog, Always Order Dessert. “With any traditional recipes there’s hot debate about what the real version is, about what’s right and what’s not,” says the New York-based food writer and recipe developer. “Some people think it should be made with egg, some people think absolutely not.” The recipe below, adapted from Ramos, is made without eggs, partly because the inclusion of raw eggs in a beverage doesn’t really appeal to me, but also, as Ramos explains, adding egg makes the drink more custard-like in texture. Without the egg, it’s still thick and creamy, but the nuances of the coconut really shine.

Another plus to this recipe: It requires merely opening several cans, blending their contents with a few spices, adding rum and chilling the whole mixture for several hours. No hacking through a fresh coconut to carefully craft your own fresh coconut milk. No tedious measuring or annoying leftover bits of ingredients — you’ll use one can each of coconut milk, cream of coconut, sweetened condensed milk and evaporated milk. And this coquito wholly embraces the big batch ease of punch while packing quite a bit of it in the form of three cups of rum.

If you like coconut and rum, then you will like this. But coquito is more than just a very strong and delicious drink. It’s also key to holiday traditions such as parrandas, or the Puerto Rican version of caroling, where people go house to house singing songs, eating pasteles (similar to tamales) and arroz con dulce (rice pudding), sipping coquito and picking up people along the way.

Coquito also brings memories of family.

“My grandmother, but especially my father, was the one who taught me how to make it,” says Bronx resident Virgen Bonafé, the mother of a friend. Bonafé’s recipe includes 12 egg yolks and a “tea” made by boiling cloves, star anise, cinnamon sticks and sometimes ginger to help with digestion. (It’s a rich drink!) She serves it well chilled, but not over ice, which can make it watery. “This is the thing,” she says, “It has to be really creamy. That’s why people don’t drink a cup, they drink little cups of it. It’s not a drink to have a lot.”

As for the alcohol, there are many, many ways to go. “Over here in New York they like to really put a lot of rum,” Bonafé says. (Same.) Bacardi or Don Q are common, but you might also see versions made with aged or spiced rum, cognac and tequila.

12ouncescanned evaporated milk

14ouncescanned, sweetened condensed milk

15ouncescanned cream of coconut, such as Coco Lopez brand (see headnote)

14ouncescanned, full-fat coconut milk

2cupswhite rum, such as Don Q or Bacardi

1cupgold rum, such as Don Q or Bacardi Gold

1tablespoonvanilla extract or vanilla paste

1teaspoonground cinnamon

Freshly grated nutmeg, for serving

3-inch cinnamon sticks, for garnish (optional)

Step 1

Working in batches, combine the evaporated milk, condensed milk, cream of coconut and coconut milk in a blender; puree until smooth, pouring the blended mixture into a large mixing bowl as you go. Blend the rums, vanilla extract or paste and the ground cinnamon with some of the coconut mixture, then whisk all of the liquids together in the bowl.

Step 2

Pour into a pitcher or glass bottles and jars with lids (with the aid of a funnel, if you have one). Seal and refrigerate for at least 2 hours, or until very cold.

Step 3

Before serving, stir or shake well to break up any solids. (If you find any remaining solids unpleasant, simply strain the coquito through a fine-mesh strainer.)

Step 4

Pour into small glasses; garnish each portion with a sprinkling of freshly grated nutmeg and a cinnamon stick, if desired.

Adapted from a recipe at AlwaysOrderDessert.com.

Tested by Kara Elder; email questions to voraciously@washpost.com.

Did you make this recipe? Take a photo and tag us on Instagram with #eatvoraciously.

For a printer-friendly and scalable version of this recipe, view it here.

The nutritional analysis is based on 36 servings.

NUTRITION

Calories: 170; Total Fat: 6 g; Saturated Fat: 5 g; Cholesterol: 5 mg; Sodium: 35 mg; Carbohydrates: 16 g; Dietary Fiber: 0 g; Sugars: 15 g; Protein: 2 g.

Source –  Washington Post 

Purple SeaMoss Benefits and FAQ | PurpleSeaMossParadise

WHAT IS PURPLE SEAMOSS? PURPLE SEAMOSS IS A FORM OF SEAWEED. REAL SEA VEGETATION NATURALLY GROWING AND PEACEFULLY HARVESTED BY HAND FROM THE CARIBBEAN SEA OF THE COAST OF JAMAICA. IT IS A MINERAL DENSE CELL-FOOD. IT IS NOT A SUPPLEMENT OR VITAMIN.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF USING PURPLE SEA MOSS? THE BENEFITS OF USING PURPLE SEA MOSS ARE VAST AND UNLIMITED, HOWEVER, WE RECOMMEND CONSUMING IT FOR ITS HIGH MINERAL CONTENT, TO AIDE IN MAINTAINING A PROPER MINERAL BALANCE IN THE BODY. PLANT BASED MINERALS ARE RESPONSIBLE AND INTEGRAL IN ALL BODY FUNCTIONS AND SYSTEMS.

HOW DO I USE PURPLE SEA MOSS? PLEASE REFER TO OUR HOW TO PAGE FOR ANSWERS TO THIS QUESTION.

 

WHAT MINERALS ARE PRESENT IN PURPLE SEA MOSS? PURPLE SEAMOSS IS AN EXCELLENT SOURCE OF MINERALS. THIS ALMOST TASTELESS SEAWEED IS LOADED WITH LIFE-ENHANCING NUTRIENTS SUCH AS CARBON, SULPHUR COMPOUNDS, PROTEIN, IODINE, BROMINE, BETA-CAROTENE, CALCIUM, IRON, MAGNESIUM, MANGANESE, PHOSPHORUS, POTASSIUM, SELENIUM, ZINC, PECTIN, B-VITAMINS, AND VITAMIN C. NOTABLY ABSENT FROM A PLANT BASED LIFESTYLE, SULPHUR CONTAINING AMINO ACIDS, SUCH AS TAURINE, ARE ABUNDANT IN PURPLE SEAMOSS, MUCH MORE THAN ANY OTHER SEAWEED.

WHERE DOES THE PURPLE SEA MOSS COME FROM? OUR PURPLE SEA MOSS IS INDIGENOUS TO THE WARM TROPICAL SEA WATER OFF THE COAST OF JAMAICA. IT IS DIVED FOR AND HARVESTED RESPONSIBLY TO PRESERVE THE ECOSYSTEM BY LOCAL DIVERS IN JAMAICA.

IS PURPLE SEA MOSS SAFE TO USE DURING PREGNANCY AND BREASTFEEDING? ALTHOUGH WE ARE NOT MEDICAL DOCTORS, WE HAVE MANY EXPECTANT AND NURSING MOTHERS WHO HAVE USED PURPLE SEA MOSS WITH NO COMPLICATIONS. IF YOU HAVE AN EXISTING MEDICAL CONDITION OR CONCERNS, PLEASE CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN BEFORE USING PURPLE SEA MOSS.

HOW LONG DOES THE DRIED PURPLE MOSS LAST BEFORE SPOILING?         DRIED PURPLE SEA MOSS IS SUPREMELY PRESERVED USING A COMBINATION OF SUNLIGHT AND MOON LIGHT TO KEEP IT BALANCED AND POTENT. IT WILL REMAIN UNSPOILED AS LONG AS IT ISN’T SUBJECTED TO CONDITIONS THAT CAUSE IT TO SPOIL. KEEP IT STORED IN A GLASS OR PLASTIC CONTAINER WELL SEALED AND OUT OF THE SUN AND MOIST, DARK DAMP AREAS WHERE MICROBES FLOURISH. WE HAVE TESTED A BATCH IN ONLY A ZIPLOCK BAG STORED IN AN OPEN INDOOR SPACE FOR 4 YEARS WITH NO SPOILAGE WHAT SO EVER.

HOW LONG DOES THE GEL LAST ON THE REFRIGERATOR?                             THE GEL WILL LAST UP TO 1 MONTH AS LONG AS IT IS STORED IN A GLASS CONTAINER AND NOT COVERED. WE HAVE TESTED IT UP TO 3 MONTHS WITHOUT ANY SIGN OF SPOILAGE AND IT MAINTAINED IT’S POTENCY AS WELL. WE RECOMMEND MAKING ONLY WHAT IS NEEDED AND USING THAT DAILY UNTIL IT IS COMPLETED TO AVOID ANY POTENTIAL PROBLEMS.

WHY ISN’T MY PURPLE MOSS TURNING INTO A GEL?                                       IT IS EITHER BECAUSE OF USING TOO MUCH WATER OR TOO LITTLE PURPLE SEA MOSS. PLEASE REFER TO THE “HOW TO” LINK FOR DETAILED GUIDANCE UNTIL YOU MASTER YOUR PROCESS.

HOW LONG DOES SHIPPING TAKE?                                                                       THE SHIPPING PROCESS IS RELATIVELY QUICK. IT TAKES 2-4 BUSINESS DAYS TO PROCESS YOUR ORDER AND HAVE IT OUT AND IT TAKES ANOTHER 1-3 DAYS VIA USPS PRIORITY MAIL TO REACH IT’S DESTINATION. INTERNATIONAL ORDERS ARE ALSO 2-4 DAYS TO PROCESS AND THE SHIPPING TIME VAIRES DEPENDING ON YOUR LOCATION. WE DO NOT ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY PACKAGE THAT IS DELAYED OR LOST BY USPS OR ANY OTHER LOGISTICS COMPANY IN TRANSIT. HOWEVER IF THAT OCCURS WE WILL DO EVERYTHING POSSIBLE TO ASSIST YOU.

WHY IS THE PURPLE MOSS SOLD OUT FREQUENTLY?                                       WE HAVE A STRONG CUSTOMER BASE AND IT GENERALLY SELLS OUT VERY QUICKLY ONCE IN STOCK. WE HAVE TO WORK WITH MAMA SEA, SO WHEN SHE DOESN’T ALLOW US TO DIVE THEN THERE ARE SOMETIMES DELAYS WHILE SHE REPLENISHES HERSELF OF WHAT WAS PREVIOUSLY HARVESTED. THIS IS THE CYCLE OF NATURE. WE ALSO TAKE OUR TIME TO PROPERLY PRESERVE IT VIA SUN AND MOONLIGHT TO ENSURE THE PHYTO-NUTRIENTS ARE LOCKED IN PROPERLY. OUR FIRST RESPONSIBILITY IS TO HONOR AND RESPECT MAMA SEA AND NATURE IN GENERAL FOR PROVIDING US WITH THIS GIFT. SO THANK YOU AS ALWAYS FOR BEING PATIENT AS WE HARVEST.

Purchase some SeaMoss and other healthy foods from PurpleSeaMossParadise 

Mokko’s Red Pea Soup

Like a gorilla to bloodclaat….ate the most bloodclaat peanuts! Learn how to make some some Rasta Mokko style Ital (mostly) Red Pea Soup! We chat Light green plantain vs dark green bananas, humans who eat whole bananas & oranges, monster dogs with blood in their teeth, white salt and its effects, airport security stories, and sample this excellent vegetarian dish with Ratty! If you want to keep it extra Ital, skip the Maggi…. Bless up, Matthew & Mokko

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Ras Kitchen Intro/Outro https://songwhip.com/artist/marc-gutt… BriZion-Okapi @briziondubwize or http://www.brizion.bandcamp.com Ocean Jams- Sparkin Just Peachy-Thick Skin Sarah, the Illstrumentalist- Hurricane Season Hara Noda-Lights Ahead Just Peachy-

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Authentic Injera (Ethiopian Flatbread)

If you’ve ever been to an Ethiopian restaurant – certainly if you’ve ever set foot in Ethiopia – you will have heard of injera.  It’s a sourdough flatbread unlike any other sourdough.  It starts out looking like a crepe but then develops a unique porous and slightly spongy texture.  The thin batter is poured onto the cooking surface, traditionally a clay plate over a fire though now more commonly a specialized electric injera stove, and the bottom remains smooth while the top develops lots of pores which makes it ideal for scooping up stews and sauces.

And that’s exactly how injera is used, as an eating utensil.  And as a plate.  And often in place of the tablecloth.  A variety of stews, vegetables and/or salads are placed on a large piece of injera and guests use their right hands to tear portions of the injera which are used for gripping the food.  The porous texture of the injera makes it ideal for soaking up the juices.

authentic injera recipe ethiopian flatbread sourdough fermented teff flour gluten free

Injera is traditionally made out of teff flour, the world’s tiniest grain and also one of the earliest domesticated plants having originated in Ethiopia and Eritrea (where injera is also widely consumed) between 4000 and 1000 BC.  Its production is limited to only areas with adequate rainfall though so it’s relatively expensive for most African households.  As such, many will replace some of the teff content with other flours like barley or wheat.  For those who can afford it, injera made entirely of teff flour has the higher demand.

Injera is the traditional accompaniment to Doro Wat, Ethiopia’s famous spicy chicken stew, and together these constitute the national dish of Ethiopia.

Injera is likewise served with Sega Wat, the delicious beef version of Doro Wat.

sega wat recipe ethiopian spicy beef stew authentic best

There are different varieties of teff ranging from white/ivory to red to dark brown.  In Ethiopia white is generally preferred and will also produce a 100% teff injera that is a lighter in color than what is shown in the first photo and preparation photos.  I’m using 100% dark teff flour which produces a very dark injera with a deeper flavor.

The challenge is that if you’re looking for a specific type of teff and like to grind your own grains, most manufacturers don’t differentiate the teff type on their package labeling.  It’s mostly an aesthetic preference though and for most baking I do with teff it really doesn’t matter either way.  With the injera it will make a difference in the color though if that’s an important factor to you.

I have found only one brand that differentiates the types:  Ivory Teff and Brown Teff.  Maskal also makes an ivory teff flour.

Traditionally a clay plate, a mitad, placed over a fire is used for making injera.

A special woven basket, called a mesab, in which the freshly made injera are placed.

More commonly now specialized electric injera stoves are used.  The most popular one in the U.S. is called the Heritage Grill.  But unless you’re making injera constantly, a simple non-stick pan on the stovetop will do the job.

Read to make some injera?

And I don’t mean short-cut, one-day, cutting corners injera.  I mean the real deal, authentic injera.

 

***IMPORTANT NOTE before we begin:  Both the texture and color of the injera will vary greatly depending on what kind of teff you use (dark or ivory) and whether or not you’re combining it with other flours.  Gluten-based flours (e.g. wheat and barley) will yield a much different texture than 100% teff.  In the pictures and recipe below I’m using 100% dark teff, something you will not find in restaurants and will look different than what most are accustomed to, but is traditional to Ethiopian home cooking.

Okay, let’s get started!

authentic injera recipe ethiopian flatbread sourdough fermented teff flour gluten free

You can buy pre-ground teff flour or grind your own.  I like to grind my own grains because 1) the flour has far more nutrition because it’s fresher and the oils haven’t oxidized and 2) I have more control over the texture of the flour.

I use and LOVE the German-made KoMo Classic Grain Mill.  It comes with a 15-year warranty.  It’s a stone-grinding mill and you can grind grains as finely or as coarsely as you like.  It’s an awesome piece of machinery and it’s just downright gorgeous!

You’ll need 2 cups of flour.  I’m using all teff flour, and mine happens to be dark teff flour which will produce a very dark injera with a deeper flavor.

As mentioned above, using 100% teff flour is traditionally considered the most desirable (it also happens to be naturally gluten-free), but you can substitute part of it with other flours such as wheat or barley.

However, if you’re new to making injera I recommend substituting a portion of teff with barley or wheat flour as 100% is more challenging to work with.

Stir in 3 cups of water (and the yeast if you’re using it).

I made two versions to show you the difference – both are identical but in one of them I added some commercial yeast (left) and the other one I didn’t (right).  What that does is prevent the formation of wild yeast because the commercial, store-bought yeast dominates.

Loosely cover the bowls with plastic wrap so that air can still get in (but no critters can) – cheesecloth is also a great option.  Let it sit undisturbed at room temperature for 5 days.  You don’t have to let it ferment that long but at least 4 days is ideal and longer it ferments the deeper the flavor will be.

Note: Depending on what kind of flour you’re using, you may need to add a little more water if the mixture is becoming dry.

After 4-5 days both versions will be fizzy when you jiggle the bowl.

Notice the difference between the mixture prepared with commercial yeast (left) and the wild yeast mixture (right).  The version made the traditional way allowing wild yeast to form is not only much darker in color, it has a film of aerobic yeast on top that you may initially think is mold but it isn’t.

It looks disgusting, I know – like why would I eat this?  But rest assured it’s perfectly normal.   Going the traditional route of relying on wild yeast – a naturally fermented product – over commercial yeast results in an injera with a richer and more complex flavor.  It’s the way injera has been made and enjoyed for centuries.

We’re simply going to discard this top layer and use what’s underneath.

Pour off the top layer and as much of the liquid as you can.

You’ll be left with a clay-like batter.  Give it a good stir.

Bring 1 cup of water to a boil in a small saucepan.  Scoop 1/2 cup of the fermented teff batter and stir it into the boiling water until the mixture is thickened.  This will happen pretty quickly.

Stir the cooked/thickened batter back into the original mixture.

Add some water to the batter to create roughly the consistency of crepe batter.  I added about 2/3 cup of water though this will vary from batch to batch.  The batter will have a sweet-soured nutty smell.

Heat a non-stick pan on medium.  Depending on how good your non-stick surface is, you may need to very lightly spray it with some oil.

Coat the surface of the pan with a thin layer of injera batter.  It should be thicker than making a crepe but not as thick as a pancake.

authentic injera recipe ethiopian flatbread sourdough fermented teff flour gluten freeauthentic injera recipe ethiopian flatbread sourdough fermented teff flour gluten free

Continue to cook – bubbles will form, allow them to pop.  Then cover the pan with a lid and turn off the heat to let it steam cook for a couple more minutes or so until cooked through.   Be careful though, if you the injera cooks too long it will become gummy and soggy.

authentic injera recipe ethiopian flatbread sourdough fermented teff flour gluten freeauthentic injera recipe ethiopian flatbread sourdough fermented teff flour gluten free

Remove the injera and repeat.

authentic injera recipe ethiopian flatbread sourdough fermented teff flour gluten free

Enjoy!

authentic injera recipe ethiopian flatbread sourdough fermented teff flour gluten free

Traditionally served with Ethiopian Doro Wat.

 Print Recipe

4.56 from 27 votes

Authentic Injera (Ethiopian Flatbread)

Experience the unique flavor and texture of this famous fermented Ethiopian bread!
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Fermentation Time: 4-5 days4 d
Total Time4 d 20 mins
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: ethiopian
Servings: 6 servings
Calories: 146kcal
Author: Kimberly Killebrew

Ingredients

  • 2 cups teff flour, brown or ivory , or substitute a portion of it with some barley or wheat flour
  • Note: If you’re new to making injera I recommend using a combination of teff and barley or wheat as 100% teff is more challenging to work with.
  • 3 cups water
  • Note: This method involves wild yeast fermentation. See blog post for details about using commercial yeast as a starter (you’ll use about 1/4 teaspoon dry active yeast)

Instructions

  • *See blog post for detailed instructions*
  • In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour and water (and yeast if you’re using it). Loosely place some plastic wrap on the bowl (it needs some air circulation, you just want to keep any critters out) and let the mixture sit undisturbed at room temperature for 4-5 days (the longer it ferments, the deeper the flavor). (Depending on what kind of flour you’re using, you may need to add a little more water if the mixture is becoming dry.)  The mixture will be fizzy, the color will be very dark and, depending on the humidity, a layer of yeast will have formed on the top. This is normal.  Pour off the yeast/mold and as much of the liquid as possible. A clay-like batter will remain. Give it a good stir.
  • In a small saucepan, bring 1 cup of water to a boil. Stir in 1/2 cup of the injera batter, whisking constantly until it is thickened. This will happen pretty quickly. Then stir the cooked/thickened batter back into the original fermented batter. Add some water to the batter to thin it out to the consistency of crepe batter. I added about 2/3 cup water but this will vary from batch to batch. The batter will have a sweet-soured nutty smell.
  • Heat a non-stick skillet over medium heat. Depending on how good your non-stick pan is, you may need to very lightly spray it with some oil. Spread the bottom of the skillet with the injera batter – not as thin as crepes but not as thick as traditional pancakes. Allow the injera to bubble and let the bubbles pop. Once the bubbles have popped, place a lid on top of the pan and turn off the heat. Let the injera steam cook for a couple or so more minutes until cooked through. Be careful not to overcook the injera or they will become gummy and soggy. Remove the injera with a spatula and repeat.
  • IMPORTANT NOTE:  Both the texture and color of the injera will vary greatly depending on what kind of teff you use (dark or ivory) and whether or not you’re combining it with other flours.  Gluten-based flours (e.g. wheat and barley) will yield a much different texture than 100% teff.  In the pictures and recipe below I’m using 100% dark teff, something you will not find in restaurants and will look different than what most are accustomed to, but is traditional to Ethiopian home cooking.  Make your injera according to what you prefer.
Serving: 1flatbread | Calories: 146kcal | Carbohydrates: 28g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 1g | Sodium: 12mg | Fiber: 5g | Calcium: 68mg | Iron: 3mg
Source – DaringGourmet 

Mokko’s Rasta Pasta

Look at this bone to bloodclaat! Ackee boil, Ackee boil….. Some Jamaica/Italy fusion on this one! Rasta Mokko (with Ratty) prepares some freshly picked ackee & salt mackerel in step one of this Rasta Pasta meal! Okra, Garlic, Scallion, Thyme…..make sure you pick the mackerel well though or it can be deadly…… We chat dangerous skellington bones, taste some Baba Roots, counting time VS food business, a thyme to laugh, a time to cry and deadly molasses…. bless up, Matthew & Mokko ★SUPPORT★ https://www.gofundme.com/helpmokko https://www.patreon.com/raskitchen https://raskitchen.com/pages/donate ★CONNECT★ Ras Kitchen Instagram & Facebook https://www.instagram.com/raskitchent… http://www.facebook.com/raskitchenTV ★VISIT RASTA MOKKO★ http://www.rastamokko.com http://bit.ly/RiversideCool1 http://bit.ly/RiversideCool2 ★Music★ Ras Kitchen Intro/Outro https://songwhip.com/artist/marc-gutt… Devil and the Perfects (Hanging out) Blue Topaz- Messed Up Break up Sarah the Illstrumentalist-Grey Hematite Jimmy Krak Korn- out West https://soundcloud.com/jimi-krak-korn Pandora-The New Fools

Ethiopian Vegetarian Platter Recipe & Story

 

When a beloved restaurant closes, the food obsessed among us panic at the prospect of losing a favourite dish forever. So when that appears to happen with Dukem, my go-to Ethiopian spot on the Danforth, I act quickly. I immediately invite owner Michael Kidus to the Star test kitchen to make four dishes from his vegetarian platter. I’m being greedy. Usually I ask chefs for just one recipe, but Ethiopian meals always involve multiple meat and/or vegetable stews, so he says yes. Kidus arrives, groceries in hand, with an unexpected guest. Banchi Kinde, the chef/owner of Rendez-Vous restaurant. They quickly unload the groceries. Red lentils, green lentils and yellow split peas. Piles of fresh garlic, ginger and onions. Jalapenos, bell peppers, cabbage, white potatoes, carrots and green leaf lettuce. Turmeric and berbere, the essential Ethiopian ground red pepper and spice blend. In a way it doesn’t look like much to work with, but I know a feast is imminent. Besides, there’s a bag of injera, the platter-sized, spongy, flatbread made from teff that Ethiopians use as an edible utensil. It’s delicious, nutritious and filling.

Without wasting a split second, Kinde starts chopping onions. “You can use a food processor to chop them up nicely and evenly,” she says. I prefer the free-form way she chops. It’s refreshing. I’m surprised to see that the garlic and ginger is puréed into a paste instead of minced. (Don’t even think about buying the jarred version as a shortcut. But feel free to cheat like I did and buy a bag of fresh, peeled garlic.) There’s no time for chitchat as the chefs cook and I scramble to measure ingredients and jot down the recipes. Like most chefs, these guys don’t work from recipes. They do switch easily between English and Amharic. Kinde calls Kidus “Mikey” and gives him tasks. He seems happy to play sous chef to her chef.

In just 1 hour and 45 minutes, the feast is ready.

Read the full article beneath the recipes below or at The Star

 RECIPES 

If you feel ambitious, you can make this entire meal. You just need four burners and four sturdy pots.

But you can also start slow. Make one dish and eat it with injera or even bread. Make the salads on their own. Build your way up to the full meal.

BERBERE LENTILS (YEMISIR WOT)

My personal favourite dish is intensely spiced, thanks to Ethiopia’s complex and fiery spice blend, berbere. It’s sold in Ethiopian grocers, but I buy mine at Mister Greek Meat Market (801 Danforth, west of Jones Ave.). Serve this and all the following Ethiopian recipes with injera (the spongy flatbread).

3/4 cup (185 mL) canola oil

1-1/2 medium yellow onions, finely chopped

1/2 cup (125 mL) berbere spice blend, or to taste

1 tbsp (15 mL) puréed fresh, peeled ginger

2 tsp (10 mL) puréed fresh garlic

1 cup (250 mL) dried red lentils, washed

3 cups (750 mL) water + more if needed

1/2 tsp (2 mL) fine sea salt, or to taste

In medium saucepan, heat oil over medium. Add onions. Cook, stirring, 8 minutes. Stir in berbere, ginger and garlic. Cook, stirring, 2 minutes. Add lentils. Cook, stirring, 1 minute.

Add 3 cups (750 mL) water. Bring to boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer, stirring often and adding water if needed, until lentils disintegrate and mixture is a thick stew, about 30 minutes. Taste; season with salt.

Makes about 4 cups (1L).

YELLOW SPLIT PEAS WITH TURMERIC SAUCE (YEKIK ALICHA)

 

1 cup (250 mL) dried yellow split peas, washed

1/4 cup (60 mL) canola oil

1-1/2 medium yellow onions, finely minced

1-1/2 tbsp (22 mL) each: puréed fresh garlic, puréed fresh, peeled ginger

1/2 tsp (2 mL) turmeric

3 cups (750 mL) water + more if needed

3/4 tsp (4 mL) fine sea salt, or to taste

Optional garnish:

Thinly sliced jalapenos with seeds

Finely chopped red bell pepper

Place split peas in medium saucepan. Cover with water; Bring to boil over high heat. Boil 5 minutes. Let sit in water until ready to use; drain.

In medium saucepan, heat oil over medium. Add onions. Cook, stirring, 8 minutes. Add garlic and ginger. Cook, stirring, 1 minute. Stir in turmeric, then drained split peas. Cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add 3 cups (750 mL) water.

Raise heat to high; bring to boil. Cook, stirring occasionally and adding more water if needed, until split peas are very soft and stew is thick and not soupy, about 30 minutes. Taste; season with salt.

If desired, serve garnished with jalapenos and bell peppers.

Makes about 3 cups (750 mL).

GREEN LENTILS WITH TURMERIC SAUCE (MISIR ALICHA)

1 cup (250 mL) dried green lentils, washed

1/4 cup (60 mL) canola oil

1-1/2 medium yellow onions, finely chopped

1-1/2 tbsp (22 mL) each: puréed fresh garlic, puréed fresh, peeled ginger

1 tsp (5 mL) turmeric

3 cups (750 mL) water + more if needed

1-1/2 tsp (7 mL) fine sea salt, or to taste

Optional garnish:

Thinly sliced jalapenos with seeds

Finely chopped red bell pepper

Put lentils in medium saucepan; cover with water. Bring to boil over high heat. Cook 5 minutes. Let stand until ready to use; drain.

In medium saucepan, heat oil over medium. Add onions. Cook, stirring, 8 minutes. Add garlic, ginger and turmeric. Cook, stirring, 2 minutes. Add drained lentils and 3 cups (750 mL) water. Raise heat to high and bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer briskly, adding more water if needed until lentils are tender, about 30 minutes. Stew should be fairly thick and not soupy. Taste; season with salt.

If desired, serve garnished with jalapenos and bell pepper.

Makes about 4 cups (1L).

CABBAGE, CARROTS & POTATOES (TIKIL GOMEN)

1/2 cup (125 mL) canola oil

1-1/2 medium yellow onions, halved, thinly sliced

3 large carrots, peeled thinly sliced on diagonal

2 white boiling potatoes, peeled, cut in 1-inch cubes

1 tbsp (15 mL) puréed fresh garlic

1 tsp (5 mL) pureéd fresh, peeled ginger

1/4 tsp (1 mL) each: turmeric, fine sea salt, black pepper

1 cup (250 mL) water

8 to 10 cups (2 to 2.5L) chopped, coredgreen cabbage

1 jalapeno, chopped with seeds

In large saucepan, heat oil over medium. Add onion. Cook, stirring, 4 minutes. Add carrots. Cook, stirring, 4 minutes. Add potatoes. Cover; Cook 5 minutes. Add garlic, ginger, turmeric, salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add water. Cook, stirring, 3 minutes. Add cabbage and jalapeno. Cook, stirring, 2 minutes. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are soft, about 5 to 8 minutes. (Don’t let it burn.)

Makes about 4 cups (1L).

ETHIOPIAN GREEN SALAD

1 tbsp (15 mL) each: extra-virgin olive oil, white wine vinegar

1/2 tsp (2 mL) puréed fresh, peeled ginger

1 tsp (5 mL) each: fine sea salt, black pepper

tomato, halved, thinly sliced

1/2 head green leaf lettuce, cut lengthwise, chopped

1/2 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced lengthwise

1/2 red bell pepper, chopped

1 jalapeno, seeded if desired, chopped

In large salad bowl, whisk together oil, vinegar, ginger, salt and black pepper. Add tomato. Whisk gently. Add lettuce, onion, bell pepper and jalapeno. Toss well.

Serve immediately.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

ETHIOPIAN TOMATO SALAD 

2 tbsp (30 mL) each: extra-virgin olive oil, white wine vinegar

1 tsp (5 mL) puréed fresh, peeled ginger

1-1/2 tsp (7 mL) fine sea salt

1/2 tsp (2 mL) black pepper

2 large tomatoes, finely chopped

1 medium yellow onion, minced

jalapenos, seeded, minced

In medium bowl, whisk oil, vinegar, ginger, salt and pepper. Add tomatoes, onions and jalapenos. Stir well. Serve immediately.

Makes 4 to 6 side servings.

Enjoy …

There’s my favourite dish: yemisir wot, a spicy, oily red lentil stew. There’s my daughter Lucy’s two favourites: Yekik alicha (yellow split peas in a mild turmeric sauce), and tikil gomen (cabbage, potatoes and carrots in turmeric sauce). To round things out there’s misir alicha (green lentils in mild turmeric sauce). Yes, there’s a love of turmeric happening here, as well as two bonus items: a green salad and a tomato salad, both Ethiopian-style. We invite about a dozen colleagues for a communal meal. Most have eaten Ethiopian before. A few are new to it, and quickly learn how to tear the injera into small pieces, use it to scoop up the stews and salad. “Eating Ethiopian food with family and friends lets you get closer,” says Kinde. “It’s a very intimate thing. It’s always a pleasant experience to feed yourself with your fingers.” At home, she says, a family might make a meal of three vegetable stews and two meat stews. The richer you are, the more meat you have. We’re rich in vegetables today. We feed a newspaper army and still have leftovers. As we’re cleaning up (they insist), Kidus tells me that Dukem is merely on hiatus. His lease was up and he’s looking for a new, bigger space on the Danforth. He has changed his storefront sign to let devastated customers know the good news.  What a relief.

I’ve been eating at Dukem since it opened nine years ago. It’s a special place and Kidus is a wonderful host. I even made it a stop on my Saucy Lady Food Safari last May when I took a busload of readers to my favourite haunts to celebrate my Toronto Star Cookbook. “Dukem always addressed the broader community and had a mission to introduce a wide variety of cultural groups in Toronto to Ethiopian culture and cuisine,” says Kidus, who loved to showcase local artists. Both Kidus and Kinde are Danforth Mosaic Business Improvement Area board members and are lobbying to get the strip from Greenwood to Monarch Park named Little Ethiopia. It’s an idea that has been floating around for several years but hasn’t yet gained traction. During Ethiopian Day celebrations in Christie Pits in September, Kidus encouraged people and restaurants to display signs mentioning Little Ethiopia.

As our kitchen time winds down, the chefs share a few trade secrets.

Kinde gets gluten-free injera flown in on Ethiopian Airlines three times a week. Kidus used to do the same for Dukem.

They both like the lamb from Mister Greek Meat Market on the Danforth, which caters to its Ethiopian customers by selling injera. They recommend Addisu Kullubi, a local brand, which costs $4 for about five pieces.

While Kidus searches for Dukem’s new home, he’s starting to organize an Ethiopian business association “to create one cooperative group that has a stronger voice in the general community.” He hopes to launch a vegetarian food preparation and delivery service for large retailers.

“I’ve reflected on the past with Dukem restaurant and I’m ready to move forward.”

I’m ready to move forward, too, sharing these six fabulous Ethiopian recipes, planning to visit Rendez-Vous restaurant, and waiting for Dukem’s triumphant return to the Danforth.