Category Archives: Travel

The Crystal Mountain

The Crystal Mountain in Egypt (Photos)

The Crystal Mountain (28° 26′ E and 27° 39′ N) between the oasis Bahariya and Farafra, northern of the White Desert, Egypt.

The Crystals are probably Barite (Schwerspat, BaSO4) and/or Calcite crystals (CaCO3). The hill was opened during works at the road from Farafra to Bahariya by accident and destroyed in part.

The hill is not a paleokarst cave with columnar-shaped stalagmites. It is a subvolcanic vault, which was emerged probably during the Oligocene age. The visible layers are e.g. White Desert limestone of the Khoman Fm.* (Late Cretaceous age), as well as a younger coal seam and hydrothermal impregnated reddish to brownish ferruginous layers. The strata are broken or brecciated and intensely with each other folded.

It is to be ascertained intense heat. The coal seam e.g. was transformed to anthracite. The crystals have increased out of climbed hydrovolcanic solutions. The hot solutions were high concentrated with BaSO and/or CaCao, which had been solved from the sediments. The solutions have penetrated into all cavities. After cooling of the solutions the crystals could increase. It were formed columns or round domes with crystals within.

The Barite veins are widely distributed to the south of Gebel El Hafhuf which is composed of a rock sequence including sandstone, shale, limestone, phosphatic limestone and phosphatic calcareous sandstone. This succession is capped by the Oligo-Miocene basaltic sheet which takes the form of open circle of about 20 m thickness.

The Crystal Mountain in Egypt (Photos)
The Crystal Mountain in Egypt (Photos)
The Crystal Mountain in Egypt (Photos)
The Crystal Mountain in Egypt (Photos)
The Crystal Mountain in Egypt (Photos)Read more at Geologyin

The deeper meaning behind waistbeads

The African Waist Beads, Meaning, Significance, And Uses

Waist beads
Source – AfricaAnswers 

 

We would make bold to say that African waist beads were more commonplace a couple of generations earlier, certainly a lot more so than they are right now.

There was, in fact, a rather innate fascination with waist beads that existed, especially for some younger women who longed to reach the age where they could adorn some. Hidden from view underneath the modest female clothes that were favored in those times, the beads peeked out at random intervals, surprising and enticing an onlooker.

Although some people remained unaware of their significance, the allure of a beaded woman was practically undeniable.

There are many varied reasons we have come across as to why African waist beads were/are worn. Common folklore attributes it to the definition of a woman’s waist; in essence, that it helps them to maintain their figures.

Traditional Ghanaian culture though had a more practical usage, where the many strings of beads around the bikini line were employed as an anchor to strap the menstrual cloth.

beads-arounf-waste-africa

Some other varied uses or significance of the waist beads include;

  • As a symbol of femininity and sensuality, only the partner a woman chooses would have the honor of seeing them fully.
  • As a sign that a woman had reached marriageable age and could now have suitors
  • Strung with bells, to show that a woman was still pure as at the time of marriage.
  • Worn on babies during naming ceremonies, some say; to accentuate their waistlines and hips as they grow.
  • As a weight measure; when gaining weight, the belt of the beads climb up and when you lose weight, it falls elegantly on the hips.
  • Upon addition of precious stones, waist beads take on healing or rejuvenation qualities; depending on ailment or what needs to be enhanced (i.e. love, physic powers, balancing), various semi-precious stones can be included in the design of your waist beads.

These days, only a few people maintain the culture of adorning these beads on a daily basis, but a vast majority are likely to put them on during special occasions. Most of the significance of the tradition is also now mostly redundant.

The women who adorn waist beads in this day and age, use it more for ornamental and beautification reasons, or simply to check their weights, so it may be wise not to read too much into a woman’s decision to wear them.

All we know is that waist beads when worn properly are beautiful things and since they have been around for quite a while, a lot of people evidently agree.

Origin of the waist bead

While there’s so much history behind waist beads, it’s generally agreed that the existence of waist beads dates back to antiquity, as far back as the 15th century.

In fact, many scholars are of the opinion that the history of beads began in ancient Egypt (North Africa) where they were donned by beautiful women as a status symbol. They were simply called ‘girdles’ at the time.

In West Africa, many historians believe the tradition of waist beads was popularized by the Yoruba tribes, notably in Senegal and Ghana (notably the Ewes, Ashantis, Krobos, Ga-Adangbes) where they speak of nobility, femininity, and affluence. Today, countries like Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone have also adopted the waist bead.

Waist bead colour: Meaning and Significance

Generally, colours play very important roles in our lives. While some people easily get drawn to bright colours, some certain colours, on the hand, literally get on other people’s nerves.

Though the meaning of the colour of a waist bead varies from culture to culture, tribe to tribe, its significance is considered very important and powerful in many African communities. Choosing the right colour of beads remains as important as its design, weight, length, and flexibility.

Below are the meanings of some bead waist colour:

  • Brown – Earth and stability
  • Gold – Good health, power and wealth
  • Green – Abundance, fertility, nature and prosperity
  • Red – Confidence and vitality
  • Turquoise – Communication and self-awareness
  • White – Light, truth and purity
  • Yellow – Energy, joy and happiness
  • Black – Power and protection
  • Blue – Loyalty and truth
  • Orange – Courage, self-confidence and vitality
  • Pink – Care, beauty, love and kindness
  • Purple – Royalty, spirituality and wisdom

The waist bead bears different names in different tribes. In Nigeria, the northern part of the country calls it Jigida while the Yorubas (the people of Southwestern Nigeria) call it Bebedi. In Igbo, it is called mgbájị́.

The waist bead is also identified as Giri-Giri, Yomba, Jel-Jelli, Bin Bin, Ileke Idi and Djalay Djalay in some other tribes.

 

Isurumuniya Cave – Ancient ULTRASONIC GATEWAY Found in Sri Lanka?

Phenomonal Travel Videos – Hey guys, I am at the Isurumuniya temple in Sri Lanka, and it is a fascinating site with many beautiful statues, but there is an ancient structure which defies all explanation. This is a cave or a den like structure which is considered sacred by locals and if you visit this place, there are 2 reasons you will feel really weird about this. One, is the thousands of bats which are tightly packed inside and you don’t understand why you see such a large number of bats here. But there is another question which will run through your subconscious mind. Why do you see these bats in such a bright place? We never see bats in broad daylight. Actually bats don’t like light, their eyes are not adapted to this condition, in fact bats go so far to avoid flying on Full Moon nights because even that much light is too bright for them. So why do bats tolerate this well-lit area and hang around this place? Locals believe that this den emits a magical sound which is not audible to human beings, but bats are mesmerized by this divine sound, which is why they stay here forever. This story seems like a fairy tale, but there is some strange coincidence between this folklore and modern scientific findings. Human beings can hear sounds only up to a frequency of 20 Khz and anything over 20Khz is called ultrasonic frequency and we are not capable of hearing such frequency. However, bats can hear ultrasonic frequencies up to 200 Khz. Is it possible that this cave is emitting an ultrasonic frequency which attracts bats? How can a natural cave emit such a frequency? Now, At first sight, we think this is a natural cave, but if you observe carefully we can see that it is not a natural structure at all. On the top, there is an arch neatly laid with stone slabs. You can see cubes cut out on the walls. There are several curvy lines carved all over the walls. And if we look carefully on the other side, and we can see small stone slabs placed on top of each other. According to legend, there is an ancient device concealed behind the stone wall which emits a magical sound capable of mesmerizing these bats. Is such a device possible? Scientists have recently discovered that it is in fact possible to make bats come to your location by emitting specific ultrasonic frequencies. Bats do get attracted to these frequencies and will approach the source. What we see in the movie “Batman” is based on fact – so today, we do have such ultrasonic devices. We know that this is not a natural cave. So, did ancient builders create some kind of ultrasonic device which is still hidden behind the wall, and if so, what does it look like? Is it possible that this cave is emitting an ultrasonic frequency which attracts bats? How can a natural cave emit such a frequency? Now, At first sight, we think this is a natural cave, but if you observe carefully we can see that it is not a natural structure at all. On the top, there is an arch neatly laid with stone slabs. You can see cubes cut out on the walls. There are several curvy lines carved all over the walls. And if we look carefully on the other side, and we can see small stone slabs placed on top of each other. According to legend, there is an ancient device concealed behind the stone wall which emits a magical sound capable of mesmerizing these bats. Is such a device possible? Scientists have recently discovered that it is in fact possible to make bats come to your location by emitting specific ultrasonic frequencies. Bats do get attracted to these frequencies and will approach the source. What we see in the movie “Batman” is based on fact – so today, we do have such ultrasonic devices. We know that this is not a natural cave. So, did ancient builders create some kind of ultrasonic device which is still hidden behind the wall, and if so, what does it look like? Perhaps the device would looks like this strange carving, which is located less than half a mile away. This figure looks like a circuit diagram with complex symbols carved all over it. There is also a wave which looks remarkably similar to a sound wave. Is it possible that an actual device like this lays buried in the walls of the bat cave? This carving is known as ‘The Stargate of Sri Lanka’ and is considered as a device that can transport us to different planets. What is even stranger is that, there is yet another similar cave nearby, popularly known as the Yoni. This Yoni is also considered a worm hole which can be activated using sound. Some people even claim that this a sonic boom tunnel. #SriLanka #AncientAliens #Search4Truth

Decoding Ancient Engineering Technology at Ramappa Temple, India

Let’s take a look at Ramappa Temple which was built at least 800 years ago, and by the end of this video, I think you would agree with me that ancient builders must have used a very advanced technology, similar to modern day technology. Let’s take a look at the ceiling in the center of this temple. In one square, we can see hundreds of Gods and if you zoom in and shine a flashlight, we can identify each and every one of them. Every corner tells a story. We are not going to examine the complex spiral designs which look like 3d cymatic patterns, we are not going to look at the protruding buds, and the centerpiece which is hanging out in the middle. We are only going to zoom in on the smaller figures which are less than 1 inch long. This temple was invaded by a commander called Malik Kafur, and he destroyed some of these figures. But what’s fascinating is that after he destroyed the figures, you can clearly see the X mark behind them.

This means there is a gap between each small idol, and the surface at the back. The idols are very small, less than 1 inch long, so the gaps between the idol and the background must have been in millimeters. So, how did anyone create these X marks behind them within these small gaps? Forget about ancient machining technology. We cannot even carve these X marks today, because there is no room to put your hands inside and carve them?

How can we make the X pattern on solid rock, with 2 millimeters space to carve, even with modern machinery? We would need flexible drilling and polishing tools similar to instruments used for advanced surgical operations like laparoscopy. Even if they were molded using rock melting technology, the ancient builders would still need very advanced precision tools to create the mold or the frame itself. But there is more baffling evidence of ancient machining technology. This temple has a series of statues placed all around it, and at first look, you think they are modern day wax models molded to perfection. Archeologists confirm that these were made by ancient builders, but there are no tool marks, and no human errors made on these structures. Were they created using high tech engraving and polishing tools, similar to what we use today?

Now, what really baffles me about these statues is not how perfect they are, but how they are still standing in place, even after a powerful earthquake shook this temple. The earthquake dislodged many of the blocks in the temple, and I have already shown you how the ancient builders made this structure earthquake proof. But how did these statues, not fall down? These are individual statues made of black basalt and are standing at an angle. How are they attached to these sandstone blocks behind them? Normally, it would be impossible to find out, but ancient builders were extremely clever, they knew that someday, someone would come looking for answers.

Travel: Make it Happen

Written by Assata Nzingha 

Best piece of advice I can give you if you want to leave the US.

Conceive an exit strategy NOW.

My current existence has been in the making in my mind for over 20 years, but logistically for about 1.5 years.

I paid down all my debt, all I have now as far as debt is my vehicle. This was a choice. Whenever I go back to the states I want and deserve to ride nice.

Start working on yourself. This is the most important piece believe it or not.

If you are miserable and complaining in the US, you will do the same in another country. Geography doesn’t change who you are, it only changes your location.

Readjust how you are living, this prepares you for life in another country.

Stop being so attached to people, places, and things. Embrace new changes and environments.

Expand your mind and learn new languages. There are tons of free and paid programs online. YouTube is a great resource as well. This is just a start as immersion into another culture is the best way to learn. I know more Spanish in 3 months than I’ve learned in 10 years.

Start expanding your interests. Get a hobby. Learn a new skill. Really explore who you are and what makes you happy because these are the things you will be doing while living abroad.

GET YOUR PASSPORT. Take action on your dreams and watch The Universe present opportunities to you for travel. Gotta be ready in order to stay ready.

Subscribe to travel websites and blogs, start randomly looking at other countries until you vibe with one you like. Go to YouTube and research scams, currency, things to do, cost of living, etc.

Research your dream like you study and research all these things that keep your attention like cell phones, celebrities, and the latest trends!

Do what a person who plans to live abroad would be doing and you are steps closer to your dreams.

The Universe and God is a supply and demand system that likes to fill voids, present what you want and watch it materialize before your eyes.

The Family That Travels and Learns!

All photos courtesy of Jermaine Griggs, Pictured in: Taj Mahal, Agra, India

This time last year, 34-year-olds Sarah and Jermaine Griggs seemed to be living the American dream. They were homeowners in California, the parents of three smart and beautiful children and the owners of two successful businesses including an online marketing consulting firm called AutomationClinic.com, and an online instrumental music company called HearandPlay.com.

But even with all of the assets that would seemingly make any family happy, the Griggs knew something was missing. With an itch to travel the world and introduce their kids to new cultures and adventures, Sarah and Jermaine knew that settling for a comfortable life in the United States was far from fulfilling. That’s why six months ago, the family of five set out on a journey to travel the world full-time and homeschool their children while doing it.

Pictured in: Egypt

“The inspiration came from a profound realization that these are our best years together and we shouldn’t spend this time trapped in what society wants us to do,” Jermaine tells Because of Them We Can. “Traveling around the world has been a desire for us but seemed like an impossible challenge with three school-aged children. When would ever be the right time? That’s when we decided to put our dream home on the market, notify their private school that we wouldn’t be returning, and started making preparations for the year ahead.”

So far, the family has visited 16 countries with Portugal being their latest stop.

“Our children are home-schooled, or you could say ‘world-schooled,’” says Jermaine. “We believe the world can be their school. That doesn’t mean the kids won’t return to traditional school, but for now we use online curriculums and supplements like Time4Learning, Khan Academy, IXL, Splash Math, plus field trips and experiential learning.”

Pictured in: Thailand

The couple explains how every country brings a different experience, with some places being their home for two weeks and other places being their home for just a few days.

“I think it comes down to our comfort level with the country,” says Jermaine. “For example, some told us that India might be too much for the kids but we definitely wanted to see Taj Mahal, so we made it a short trip. But after experiencing India ourselves, we’re convinced that we need to return with a longer itinerary.”

Pictured in: Maui, Hawaii

The family notes that their visit to Taj Mahal has been a highlight for them, in addition to other amazing adventures like landing via a helicopter on the top of a glacier in Queenstown, New Zealand, and taking a sea plane and landing on water in Fiji.

“There’s just too many,” says Jermaine of his favorite experiences thus far.

Their oldest child Jadyn, who is 11, says the Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary in Ubud, Bali was her favorite place to visit because ever since she was a toddler she’s had a fascination with monkeys and apes.

Pictured in: Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

“In fact, one of her favorite movies, I know this sounds bad, when she was younger was ‘Planet of the Apes,’” explains her dad. “Having hundreds of monkeys roam around freely, jumping and swinging on her shoulders was a dream come true for her.”

As entrepreneurs, Sarah and Jermaine say they are blessed to have a supportive team at home who manages the day-to-day operations of both companies while they travel. But to prove that starting your own company isn’t a prerequisite to traveling, the couple says they plan to start a blog where they will share tips and advice for other families who are looking to financially afford trips around the world with their kids.

Pictured in: Queenstown, New Zealand

Through their traveling journey, Sarah and Jermaine say they hope their three children will develop a better understanding for life beyond the comforts of the U.S.

 

Read the full article at BecauseOfThemWeCan

The Taj Mahal

 

The Taj Mahal  meaning “Crown of the Palace”  is an ivory-white marble mausoleum on the south bank of the Yamuna river in the Indian city of Agra. It was commissioned in 1632 by the Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan (reigned from 1628 to 1658), to house the tomb of his favourite wife, Mumtaz Mahal. The tomb is the centrepiece of a 17-hectare (42-acre)[5] complex, which includes a mosque and a guest house, and is set in formal gardens bounded on three sides by a crenellated wall.

Construction of the mausoleum was essentially completed in 1643 but work continued on other phases of the project for another 10 years. The Taj Mahal complex is believed to have been completed in its entirety in 1653 at a cost estimated at the time to be around 32 million rupees, which in 2015 would be approximately 52.8 billion rupees (U.S. $827 million). The construction project employed some 20,000 artisans under the guidance of a board of architects led by the court architect to the emperor, Ustad Ahmad Lahauri.

A resource for information and visual manifestation

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