Category Archives: Travel

Traditional Food in Ethiopia w. Mark Wiens

Today was a little bit of a random day in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, searching for delicious Ethiopian food. I first met up with Sam, and he took me a little outside of town, an area known for their meat. We asked some locals around, and found a local meat restaurant that everyone agreed was the best in the city. Dulet – Dulet is an Ethiopian food of minced up raw organs, sauteed in Ethiopian spiced butter. It’s incredibly delicious. The the man sitting next to me ordered shekla tibs, a pan of sliced meat fried and served in a charcoal clay pan. It was very chewy, but tasty. Total price – 230 ETB ($8.31) including drinks Tej – Tej is traditional Ethiopian honey wine, and after asking, some people told us there was a local Ethiopian bar just down the road. It was quite an Ethiopian cultural experience. Price – 9 ETB ($0.33) per cup El Shaday Restaurant – Finally, we returned to Addis Ababa, in the center of the city, and searched out an Ethiopian food that I had desperately wanted to eat – called Tihlo. It’s a dish from Tigray, very rare to find in Addis Ababa, and even the friends I was eating with, who are all Ethiopian, had never heard of it, or tried it. So it was a first for all of us. Turned out to be incredibly delicious, and now one of my favorite new Ethiopian dishes. Price – 80 ETB ($2.89) Thank you for watching this unique Ethiopian food tour in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia!

Hotel I stayed at in Addis Ababa: https://www.booking.com/hotel/et/zeis…

MUSIC: https://goo.gl/HwVjdo

***CAMERA GEAR*** I used to make this video (these are affiliate links): Main camera:
http://amzn.to/2sV0XQO
Main lens: http://amzn.to/2szLZNf
2nd lens: http://amzn.to/2EjBeEg
Microphone: http://amzn.to/2rBKD3z
Drone: http://amzn.to/2CrtAHz

 

Travel Select: Lake Tana The Blue Nile

 

The Blue Nile looks like a sluggish beast as it meanders out of Lake Tana, but not far out of Bahir Dar you’ll see the Nile in a very different mood. The river pours over the side of a sheer 42m-high chasm and explodes into a melange of mists and rainbows (best at 10am) before continuing on its tumultuous path to Khartoum, where it finally gets to kiss the White Nile.

The catch to this impressive scene is that hydroelectric projects upstream have stolen most of the energy from Tis Abay, the ‘Nile that Smokes’. Though far smaller than its natural 400m-wide flow, the three-pronged waterfall is still jaw-droppingly huge in August and September. From around January or February until March it’s now known as ‘Blue Nile Shower’ and it’s not really worth a visit. The in-between time is still beautiful enough that most people enjoy the trip (though note that one of the hydro plants only operates on standby and if it’s turned on during this time the waterfall gets turned off). You may want to ask fellow travelers who’ve recently been to the falls about the flow, as tourist-industry operators won’t always give you a straight answer.

The ticket office is at the very end of the road through the town of Tis Abay. The road to the falls starts 50m west of here and it’s 1.5km to the start of a rocky footpath that leads down to a 17th-century Portuguese bridge (which was the first bridge to span the Blue Nile) along the so-called eastern route. From here the trail climbs up through a small village and a gauntlet of children selling souvenirs to reach the main viewpoints. Some people backtrack from here, but the better option is to take the suspension bridge over the narrow Alata River and walk down to the base of the falls. In the dry season you can swim at the bottom and walk behind the watery curtain. You can complete a circuit by using a path above the falls and crossing the river by motorboat. The boat service usually operates 7am to 6pm, but when the river runs too fast the boats can’t cross. Look for crocs during dry-season mornings. The entire walk is about 5km and takes about 2½ hours with lots of gawping time. As it’s not very steep, less energetic or mobile people may want to approach and return from the falls along this western route.

The falls are located 28km southeast of Bahir Dar down a bad dirt road; the first 10km were being sealed at the time of writing. Buses from Bahir Dar leave about hourly for Tis Abay village (Birr15, one hour). The last bus back usually leaves about 4.30pm, but to be safe, plan to return around 3.30pm. You don’t need to pay anyone to hold a seat for you. If you miss the bus, hitching back isn’t tough, though it will probably be expensive.

Zelalem Memory in Bahir Dar can organise excursions here for Birr1200, which includes a vehicle, fuel and a driver; a guide costs Birr400 extra. It’s pricey, but less so if you can get a group together.

Tickets & tours

Lake Tana and Blue Nile Falls Day Tour
$20
Best of Bahir Dar in One Day: Blue Nile Falls and Island Monastries
$148.75
Day Trip To Debre Libanos & Blue Nile Gorge
$55

Find out more about the waterfall and ethiopian tours here. 

Details
Hours7am-5.30pm
Priceadult/student/child Birr50/30/free, personal video cameras Birr50, mandatory guide Birr100

Senegal | The largest museum of Black Civilization

After 52 years of waiting, Senegal is finally opening what has been described as the largest museum of Black civilization in the capital, Dakar.

With close to 14,000 square metres of floor space and capacity for 18,000 exhibits, the new Museums of Black Civilizations is already capable of competing with the National Museum of African American History in Washington

Read the full article at ShoppeBlack

100 Year Old Church Becomes Psychedelic Skate Park

Source – The Plaid Zebra

The Treasures of Tanis

To the average person with a passing interest in Ancient Egypt, they will heard of The Sphinx, The Pyramids, The Valley of the Kings and the tomb of King Tutankhamen, the latter being arguably the great archaeological discovery of all time due to the vast amounts of treasure unearthed by explorer, Howard Carter. King Tutankhamen’s tomb is of course world famous, with sell-out exhibitions as the collection of priceless artefacts tour the world, most recently in Paris. But there is another royal Egyptian treasure trove that for some reason has escaped the limelight. It was found in the city of Tanis, located in the Nile Delta northeast of Cairo and, in many ways, it is actually far more spectacular than that of the 18th dynasty boy-king. It is known as the Treasures of Tanis and the priceless artefacts were found in the late 1930s and early 1940s. The excavated area consisted of an entire complex of royal tombs, and, unlike the tomb of Tutankhamen, one was found perfectly intact. In total the hoard of precious artefacts include four solid gold death masks, two beautiful and incredible solid silver coffins lined with gold and spectacular examples of Ancient Egyptian jewellery made from the most precious metals and stones. They were discovered by Pierre Montet but because of the Second World War, the finds from Tanis went largely ignored with the media focussing their attention elsewhere. Watch this video to find out about the Treasures of Tanis, about Pierre Montet, Pharaoh Psusennes, Osorkon and Sheshenq II, and why these stunning priceless discoveries made from gold, silver and gemstones could well be the greatest treasure ever discovered in Egypt.

Sources: https://archive.archaeology.org/0505/…

Mystery of the Silver Pharaoh documentary by National Geographichttp://setkenblog.blogspot.com/2012/1…

Prototype of Kailasa Temple at Ellora Caves Discovered!

Hey guys, today,let’s take a look at this ancient temple known as Kailasa Nathar temple, located in a city called Kanchipuram in South India and I am going to show you some solid evidence of how this was the model for the famous Kailasa Temple in Ellora Caves.The Kailasa Temple in Ellora Caves has baffled all experts, because the entire temple is made of one solid rock and the rock cutting technology of going from top to bottom is simply unbelievable. These 2 temples are 750 miles apart, but share some deep rooted connections. When you look at the kailasanathar temple tower from the ground, it looks like a normal step pyramid. But when you look at it from the air, you realize that there is something strange about the design. It is not just a simple pyramid. There are 8 smaller pyramids attached from the outside to the large tower in the center. This is very different from most temples, most Hindu temples are just simple pyramids. There is one other temple which also has smaller pyramids surrounding the larger stepped Pyramid in the center. And that is Kailasa Temple in Ellora caves. If you compare the 2 temples side by side, you can see that there is striking similarity: there is one central tower, but both these temples have smaller towers around them. And not just a number of towers okay, both have 8 smaller towers surrounding the large central tower. This cannot be a mere coincidence.If you look at the layout of both the temples., there is One main tower, surrounded by 8 smaller towers, and then there is a chariot like structure in the front. The two temples are not identical, but the basic blueprint is the same. There is a rectangular area left around the towers for people to walk around. And in the front, at the very entrance, they both have a smaller tower with an elevated level. There is another similarity. In my last video, I showed you that the Kailasanathar temple has 56 chambers inside the compound wall, which were used for meditation, and when I checked the plan of Kailasa temple in Ellora caves today, I am shocked because it also has 56 chambers inside the compound walls. This plan is taken directly from Wikipedia, and yes they both have 56 chambers, which were all used for meditation. We know for a fact that this cannot be a coincidence. But this video is not just about similarities in architecture, okay? The original names of both these temples are Kailasanatha.Even though the temple in Ellora Caves is now popularly known as Kailasa temple, the original name of it, is Kailasanatha, meaning the lord of Mount Kailash.So, both temples actually have the exact same name. And the central deity is Shiva in the form of Lingam, in both temples.And what is the purpose of these 2 temples? Why were these 2 Kailasanatha temples built? Nobody knows exactly why, but there seems to some deep rooted connection to Spirituality, to Human consciousness itself. Perhaps we could understand this by looking at the secret passages in these 2 temples. Both temples are designed with mysterious tunnels.In the Kailasa temple at Ellora Caves, there are some deep tunnels and at the end of them, there are rectangular holes cut at the very bottom.Some of them even go underground, but all these holes are impossible to crawl through, because they are too small for human beings. In Kailasanathar temple in South India, there are 2 tunnels which also have rectangular holes at the bottom, and if you are fit, you can squeeze and crawl through these passages. One opening is called the Gate of Death and the other opening is called the Gate of Birth.Locals in Ellora Caves, believe there are similar gates in Kailasa temple as well and entering through a certain hole can take you to a different dimension.Some even claim that these portals are kept locked to prevent people from accessing them., because they contain the secret to rebirth and immortality. Even though we are not able to fully understand the purpose of the passages, the fact that both these temples were designed with small rectangular tunnels, is quite intriguing. Now, let’s take a look at the carvings in the walls of both temples. This is the Kailsanathar temple and you can see gigantic carvings of Shiva, adorning the walls. Each one tells a specific story of Shiva, here you can see him coming out of a Lingam.This is from the Kailasa Temple at Ellora Caves, telling the same story on its walls. Here is a dancing Shiva in Kailasa Temple at Ellora caves, and here is a very similar carving of Dancing Shiva in Kailasanathar temple. So, it is crystal clear that one temple inspired the other temple, one temple was used a model for the other temple. So which one was built first?

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13 Things You Should Know About Pakistani Culture

The Pakistan Monument, a landmark in Islamabad, represents four provinces of Pakistan
The Pakistan Monument, a landmark in Islamabad, represents four provinces of Pakistan | © Shahid Khan / Alamy Stock Photo
If there is a country whose culture is starkly contrasted by its international image, it has to be Pakistan. Pakistanis all over the world often face the dilemma of explaining what their culture really entails, thanks to years of news-media exaggeration and agenda setting. Beyond democratic and economic disappointment dwells a world of Pakistani civil society that works resiliently against all odds to keep what matters most intact: the country’s vibrant culture. Let’s try to get to know Pakistan a little better.

Pakistani culture is very diverse

Thanks to its historical, geographical and ethnic diversity, Pakistan’s culture is a melting pot of Indian, Persian, Afghan, Central Asian, South Asian and Western Asian influences. There are over 15 major ethnic groups in Pakistan, which differ in physical features, historical bloodlines, customs, dress, food and music. Some of these include Punjabis, Sindhis, Baloch, Pashtuns, Kashmiris, Hazaras, Makranis and Baltis, coming from regions as close to home as the Indus Valley or as far as Africa or Tibet. Other than ancient ethnic elements, the religious influence of Islam has also strongly shaped Pakistani culture since it first came to the region in AD 700.

Pakistan, Chitral, Rumbur Valley, Kailash women dancing at annual harvest festival.
Pakistan, Chitral, Rumbur Valley, Kailash women dancing at annual harvest festival. © Asia Image Group Pte Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo

Many different languages are spoken in Pakistan

The official number of languages actively spoken in Pakistan is between 73 and 76. This means that within hours as you travel between the country’s districts, there are languages that other groups in different regions do not speak. The most popular languages, however, belong to the largest ethnic groups with their own modern and ancient literature. Most languages in Pakistan belong to the Indo-Iranian language group, including Urdu, the national language.

The people are friendly, but gender segregation still exists

Due to Islamic and tribal influences, non-urban regions of Pakistan have varying levels of gender segregation, while big cities too have conservative expectations in terms of interactions between men and women. Couples usually don’t hug or kiss in public in a non-platonic way. Regardless of that, the people of Pakistan are helpful, friendly, approachable and humble.

Pakistanis love listening to – and making – music

Diverse culture has exposed Pakistani musicians to many different poetic forms and styles, along with languages and literature. Qawwali and Ghazal are the nation’s auditory treasures. Building on that, Pakistani TV shows, like Coke Studio, have amassed millions of fans internationally and locally, from non-Pakistanis to non-Urdu speakers. The nation has also produced legendary singers, like Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan and poets like Faiz Ahmed Faiz, who have left a tremendous influence on the culture and the collective conscience of the people. Contemporary musicians too play with modern styles and develop fusions in the Urdu language, of blues, funk, rock and jazz.

Rahat Fateh Ali Khan perform
Rahat Fateh Ali Khan perform © alberto / Alamy Stock Photo

Family bonds are strong in Pakistan

Family comes first in Pakistan due to religious, cultural, economic and societal values. Pakistani society is not led by individualism but rather by collectivism, where family and other relationships stand strong.

Pakistani culture includes excellent craftsmanship

Pakistani truck art is not the only world-famous example of craftsmanship. Passed down through generations, Pakistani craft includes a plethora of styles, materials and aesthetics. Calligraphy in Arabic is one of the most prominent skills found in many local buildings and sites and wall hangings, like copper work, paintings and carved wood. Pottery, especially blue pottery, typical of Sindh and Multan, is loved all over the world for its look. Naqashi, or the art-making of camel-skin lamps, is another example of local craft, along with colourful tile work, which is a Mughal legacy.

Head Women's Jewelry nomadic Pashtuns Pashtun Pakistan Silver 20th Cent.
Head Women’s Jewelry nomadic Pashtuns Pashtun Pakistan Silver 20th Cent. © Peter Horree / Alamy Stock Photo

Sufism has given birth to beautiful poetry and music

Mainstream Islam and Islamic mysticism are both prevalent in Pakistan, but often, hard-line clerics, who follow the Wahhabi school of thought, reject the tradition of mysticism or Sufism that has added great beauty to the already unique Islamic flavour of the country. Sufis show their devotion through many means like dance, poetry, whirling, meditation, etc. Some of the country’s most spiritually advanced and unifying messages of love are found in Sufi poetry. The hard-liners may try to isolate them, but the population cannot help but be entranced by them.

Read the full article at The Culture Trip

Advanced Machining Technological Evidence

Hey guys, in the ancient site of tiger caves, there are several strange marks found on rocks. This site is perfect for studying ancient technology. So, let’s go take a look and see what we can find. Here, you can see a strange rock which is standing at an angle. Let us go take a look at what it is. Is it a natural rock or was some kind of work done on this? The rock is tilted about 30 degrees and is very tall, about 35 feet. Upon closer inspection, you can see some weird shapes and abstract carving like cuts on it. Is it possible that ancient builders were working on it, and this is not a natural formation? Geologists and other experts will absolutely deny this, but they are just humans and are prone to errors. Let us take the God’s point of view, let us examine this rock from the sky. On one side, it looks normal but the truth is revealed when we turn to the other side. What do you think now? We can clearly see a series of perfect cuts on the top of the rock. Now we know, that it is a fact, that ancient builders were working on this rock. But what were they doing? What could be the purpose of these cuts on the top of the rock? From the ground, it is nearly impossible to see these marks. Even more interesting, it is impossible to climb this rock, it is perfectly smooth and slippery you have to climb more than 30 feet without holding anything. So, How did ancient builders climb up and make these cuts? And most importantly what possible purpose could these little holes have served? Tiger caves site is a very strange place, the purpose of many of the structures is UNKNOWN, including the so-called Tiger cave structure itself, nobody knows why these structures were built. But if you examine this site carefully, it appears to be a laboratory, a lab where various rock cutting technologies were tested. How about this rock? You can clearly see that one giant rock has been split into 4 pieces..or actually 5 pieces. This is not natural. This rock is many feet long and is made of solid granite. This looks like a giant loaf of bread and somebody used a giant knife to cut it into several pieces. But it is actually quite impossible to cut this rock like bread. Why? Because granite is a very very hard rock. Most people do not understand how hard it is, and many think they can easily cut it or break it. It is one of the hardest rocks in the world and we use diamond-tipped tools to cut granite.

 

 

Mysteries of Tiger caves, Mahabalipuram

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Hey guys today I’m going to show you a strange place called Tiger caves. This site you’re about to see has many strange features. I think it must have been an ancient lab. What you’re about to see is really mind-boggling because most people have never seen something like this. There’s something very mysterious about these tiger caves this is not a cave there are no caves here and neither do these monuments show Tigers. If you look at these carvings there are no Tigers and historians maintain that these structures were created by Pallava kings but Pallava Kings never carved Tigers because it symbolizes their rival Cholas so what is the origin of this structure? In normal hindu temples and monuments carvings will appear to have little details when you are far away and as you approach the monuments the carvings will show the more finer details but the structure is the complete opposite of this. When you’re close to the structure you cannot make out what it is. If you see the carvings from this distance you cannot even tell what they are, you cannot even tell if they’re animals. But the farther you go you will get a clearer picture. Jus try… watch how the camera moves farther and farther and the picture gets clearer and clearer. This is the beauty of tiger caves. The tiger cave was supposed to be built about 1300 years ago but some people believe that it was built much much earlier than that more than 10,000 years ago. This is a strange structure many archaeologists agree that this was not a temple but nobody knows why the structure was built? There are no statues. There are other features which explain what the structure was meant to be but you do see various animals. This animal which is commonly mistaken as a tiger has large fangs but also has horns like a cow and you can see more animals what you see here is an elephant. There are more elephants carved nearby but there’s also a horse that’s carved here. Why did they build a monument like this full of different animals? Nobody knows. As you can see this is just a rock it’s just a gigantic rock but you know ancient builders were capable of converting these things into amazing monuments. Just take a look at this, this is incredible as you can see this is just one rock but they’ve turned this into a temple. Let’s go take a look at what it has to offer for us. Now you can see a most spectacularly machined Lingam inside this chamber. This is one of the most complicated structures which were built in the ancient times. Just go inside, take a look how it looks. This Lingam has 16 facets and all the angles are perfectly made imagine taking a block of stone and making them into 16 equal sides with perfect angles. Today you would use C & C machines computerized technology to make a structure like this but how was it done more than a thousand years ago?

A resource for information and visual manifestation

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