Category Archives: Travel

Voodoo Wrestling is Empowering Women in The Congo

Catch Fétiche — loosely translated, “voodoo wrestling” — is a uniquely Congolese fighting style: a combination of traditional African wrestling moves, old religious practices, and one man’s obsession with Hulk Hogan.

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Breathtaking Look at the Man Who Climbed Everest 21 Times

Every spring, Mount Everest draws in people from around the world to conquer its peak. Despite the riches surrounding the highest point on Earth, the Sherpa people who live in its shadow remain poor with few educational opportunities. One man hoping to change this reality is Apa Sherpa, a child of the Khumbu and world-record holder for summiting Everest. Like many before him, Apa Sherpa was pulled from home at the age of 12 to work on the mountain as a high-altitude porter. Now, the Apa Sherpa Foundation is working to create a different future for the children of Nepal. As Apa says, “without education we have no choice.” ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe ➡ Get More Short Film Showcase: http://bit.ly/ShortFilmShowcase About Short Film Showcase: The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners. See more from National Geographic’s Short Film Showcase at http://documentary.com Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible. Breathtaking Look at the Man Who Climbed Everest 21 Times | Short Film Showcase https://youtu.be/R3VMW6fxK6Y National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Gliders 101

The wings on a glider have to produce enough lift to balance the weight of the glider. The faster the glider goes the more lift the wings make. If the glider flies fast enough the wings will produce enough lift to keep it in the air. But, the wings and the body of the glider also produce drag, and they produce more drag the faster the glider flies. Since there’s no engine on a glider to produce thrust, the glider has to generate speed in some other way. Angling the glider downward, trading altitude for speed, allows the glider to fly fast enough to generate the lift needed to support its weight.

The way you measure the performance of a glider is by its glide ratio. This ratio tells you how much horizontal distance a glider can travel compared to the altitude it has to drop. Modern gliders can have glide ratios better than 60:1. This means they can glide for 60 miles if they start at an altitude of one mile. For comparison, a commercial jetliner might have glide ratios somewhere around 17:1.

If the glide ratio were the only factor involved, gliders would not be able to stay in the air nearly as long as they do. So how do they do it?

The key to staying in the air for longer periods of time is to get some help from Mother Nature whenever possible. While a glider will slowly descend with respect to the air around it, what if the air around it was moving upward faster than the glider was descending? It’s kind of like trying to paddle a kayak upstream; even though you may be cutting through the water at a respectable pace, you’re not really making any progress with respect to the riverbank. The same thing works with gliders. If you are descending at one meter per second, but the air around the plane is rising at two meters per second, you’re actually gaining altitude.

There are three main types of rising air used by glider pilots to increase flight times:

  • Thermals
  • Ridge lift
  • Wave lift

Thermals

Thermals are columns of rising air created by the heating of the Earth’s surface. As the air near the ground is heated by the sun, it expands and rises. Pilots keep an eye out for terrain that absorbs the morning sun more rapidly than surrounding areas. These areas, such as asphalt parking lots, dark plowed fields and rocky terrain, are a great way to find thermal columns. Pilots also keep a look out for newly forming cumulus clouds, or even large birds soaring without flapping their wings, which can also be signs of thermal activity.

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Once a thermal is located, pilots will turn back and circle within the column until they reach their desired altitude at which time they will exit and resume their flight. To prevent confusion, gliders all circle in the same direction within thermals. The first glider in the thermal gets to decide the direction — all the other gliders that join the thermal must circle in that direction.

Ridge Lift

Ridge lift is created by winds blowing against mountains, hills or other ridges. As the air reaches the mountain, it is redirected upward and forms a band of lift along the windward side of the slope. Ridge lift typically reaches no higher than a few hundred feet higher than the terrain that creates it. What ridge lift lacks in height however, it makes up for in length; gliders have been known to fly for a thousand miles along mountain chains using mostly ridge lift and wave lift.

Wave Lift

Wave lift is similar to ridge lift in that it is created when wind meets a mountain. Wave lift, however, is created on the leeward side of the peak by winds passing over the mountain instead of up one side. Wave lift can be identified by the unique cloud formations produced. Wave lift can reach thousands of feet high and gliders can reach altitudes of more than 35,000 feet.

Detecting Lift

Columns and bands of rising air obviously benefit any glider pilot, but how can you tell if you are flying in one? The answer is the variometer, a device that measures the rate of climb or descent. The variometer uses static pressure to detect changes in altitude. If the glider is rising, then the static pressure drops (because air pressure decreases the higher you go). If the glider is sinking, then the static pressure rises. The needle on the variometer indicates the rate of change in altitude based on the rate of change of static pressure. When flying through a rising mass of air (like a thermal), the needle on the variometer will jump (and usually beep to notify the pilot) before any change on the altimeter is even noticeable.

Detecting Yaw

The glider is yawing when it is not pointing exactly in the direction it is flying (relative to the air around it). Instead the glider is angled sideways and is “slipping” or “skidding” through the air. The string on the windshield indicates whether the glider is flying straight (string straight) or whether it is yawing (string left or right). The glider produces the least drag when it flies straight through the air. When it is yawing, the drag increases — so in general, glider pilots try to keep the string straight.

Benin Celebrates West African Voodoo

The International Festival of Porto-Novo is the capital’s annual celebration of Benin’s cultural diversity. The theme of this year’s festival is Ogoun, one of the spiritual entities of the voodoo religion

Devotees dressed as Egouns (ghosts) parade on the main road
One of the costumes being paraded along the road
One of the costumes
Devotees dressed as Zangbeto

Harley Davidson E – Bike

For the ultimate combination of style, performance and innovative design, look no further than the new line of electric bikes from Harley Davidson.

It’s not all about the premium branding that comes with the 116-year old motorcycle manufacturing legacy.

The highly anticipated set of bikes comes with impressive features that any biking lover would relish.

Slated for release in 2019, the LiveWire is first on the line, with the capacity to go from 0 to 60 mph in a mere 3.5 seconds.

For motorcycle lovers who delight in that unique rumble of speed, it comes with a new signature sound during acceleration. That’s an outstanding feature in as far as electric bikes go.

Another first for the new model is its cellular connection, which the company claims is not available on any other mass market motorcycle.

It’s telematics system displays all the necessary data about operations via a connected app. On a single charge, the bike can go for up to 110 miles.

Details are still scanty for their other all-electric concept bikes, but judging from their style, they hold promise of great things to come.

Source – awesomestuff365

Guggenheim Tulum’s Treehouse

The brainchild of Peggy Guggenheim’s great-grandson, IK Lab’s new seaside gallery features curved walls like the NYC original—and a few other surprising features

Before you enter IK Lab, a new arts and cultural space in the heart of Tulum, you must first take off your shoes. Part of the experience, according to its designer Jorge Eduardo Neira Sterkel, is through your feet, which alternately pass over carpets of curving jungle vines and polished cement. And proceed with caution: The floor occasionally slopes unexpectedly.

“If you don’t pay attention, you’ll fall,” says Sterkel, explaining how an uneven floor is a humbling attitude adjustment. “You have to lose control to pay attention to what you feel, emotionally and spiritually.”

The Argentine native, a former painter with no formal architectural background, constructed the curvaceous, womblike IK Lab on the site of his eco-conscious resort Azulik (a portmanteau of the Spanish word for “blue” and the Mayan word for “wind”) with a deep reverence for Mother Nature: No trees were cut, and the amorphous structure sits on stilts so that local wildlife can still pass below. Light permeates both the walls of vines reinforced by transparent fiberglass and the grand, misshapen portico doors—all of which normally spells disaster for showing art.

“This is the counter model of the standard gallery,” says IK Lab director Santiago Rumney Guggenheim, since curators typically prefer the reliable blank canvas of straight white walls. But when Rumney Guggenheim moved to Tulum in January (having grown up in Paris and lived in New York, where he temporarily had a gallery of his own), he immediately proposed that Sterkel turn the site into a gallery.

“When I walked into the space, it reminded me that in 1948, Peggy [Guggenheim, his great-grandmother] had opened a gallery in New York called Art of This Century, and the walls were curved,” he says. (The family legacy of difficult architecture also includes the curving walls of the Frank Lloyd Wright’s New York building, for starters, or the cavernous, billowing ones of Frank Gehry’s Bilbao). “I saw it as a challenge,” he adds. “You have to rethink how you’re going to put together a show.”

On Friday, IK Lab opens its first exhibition: “Alignments,” in which Rumney Guggenheim makes use of the unusual space by hanging nearly-ten-foot-long sculptures by Artur Lescher from the cavernous ceiling and illuminating neon works by Margo Trushina. In an adjacent 39-foot-high dome, Tatiana Trouvée’s 250 Points Towards Infinity comprises suspended pendulums pointing at 250 different points on the ground.

Beyond this inaugural show, the duo’s vision is farther reaching, including art programs for local children, and a multidisciplinary residency for aspiring artists, fashion designers, chefs, musicians, and more now under construction off-site deep in the jungle. “The artist will be developing his or her work as a resident taking in consideration and being affected by what’s happening around them, walking barefoot, touching different textures and exchanging ideas,” says Sterkel, who calls Tulum “a Mayan paradise.”

“They’ll make a playful space of creativity and sharing and playful and everyone is learning,” he adds. “This is my dream there.”

Crystal Skull Bridge & Strange Lingams in River – Kbal Spean, Cambodia

Hey guys, today we are at a very special place called Kbal Spean in Cambodia. As you can tell, this is a very remote place, but there are some very interesting Hindu artifacts found underwater. We are in the deepest part of the jungles of Cambodia. But there are remnants which are more than 900 years old in this area, and they are found underwater, so we are going to try and find them today. So, let’s go. I had previously shown you underwater lingams at a place called Phnom Kulen, this place is about 40 kilometers from there. I am trying to decode the meaning of these underwater lingams and why ancient builders made carvings on the river beds in these remote mountains. I find it very intriguing that there are 2 sites which have ancient underwater carvings side by side. What could be the meaning of this? I have been walking for more than 45 minutes now, I have been walking uphill. You can see how dark this entire area is, well, it is 2 o clock in the afternoon. There is bright sunlight, but with all these trees, you can see that even sunlight cannot pass through, because we are in the middle of a jungle. And we still have to walk for more than an hour to reach these ancient Hindu sites. So I am gonna keep walking. So we have reached the top of Kbal Spean mountain. We can find some very interesting stone carvings here. Now what does Kbal Spean mean? The word actually comes from Kabala, meaning skull, in Sanskrit. And Spean means bridge in Cambodian. But I will show you Kbal Spean later, let us look at the carvings now. And here we can see something fantastic

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