Harley Davidson E – Bike

For the ultimate combination of style, performance and innovative design, look no further than the new line of electric bikes from Harley Davidson.

It’s not all about the premium branding that comes with the 116-year old motorcycle manufacturing legacy.

The highly anticipated set of bikes comes with impressive features that any biking lover would relish.

Slated for release in 2019, the LiveWire is first on the line, with the capacity to go from 0 to 60 mph in a mere 3.5 seconds.

For motorcycle lovers who delight in that unique rumble of speed, it comes with a new signature sound during acceleration. That’s an outstanding feature in as far as electric bikes go.

Another first for the new model is its cellular connection, which the company claims is not available on any other mass market motorcycle.

It’s telematics system displays all the necessary data about operations via a connected app. On a single charge, the bike can go for up to 110 miles.

Details are still scanty for their other all-electric concept bikes, but judging from their style, they hold promise of great things to come.

Source – awesomestuff365

Deity Darkness in India

India is the most diversified country in the world. With 29 states and a population of 1.2 billion living in these states, the culture and traditions are followed by 9 religions.

But, there’s one thing in common. Every God or Goddess has been portrayed  to us as White Skinned when majorly the population has a darker tone.

And thus, these Chennai based photographers- Naresh Nil and Bhardwaj Sundar, break all the stereotypes and re-create the same image of Gods with a dark tone in their beautiful photographs.

Divinity has many forms, and colours have been used in various ways to depict the Divine. The jury is out, but in common culture, we still find godliness being depicted through ‘white’ or ‘fair’ skin, right from the small photo of God in the neighborhood store, to the big framed photo hanging inside a house.

By depicting Gods we revere as dark-skinned, this initiative aims to celebrate a different view of their divinity, serenity and all pervasive beauty by going beyond perceptions.

1. Goddess Lakshmi

2. Goddess Durga

3. Goddess Saraswati

4. Lord Shiva

5. Lord Krishna

6. Bala Murugan, form of Lord Subrahmanya

Read the full article and see more art work at buddybits

Guggenheim Tulum’s Treehouse

The brainchild of Peggy Guggenheim’s great-grandson, IK Lab’s new seaside gallery features curved walls like the NYC original—and a few other surprising features

Before you enter IK Lab, a new arts and cultural space in the heart of Tulum, you must first take off your shoes. Part of the experience, according to its designer Jorge Eduardo Neira Sterkel, is through your feet, which alternately pass over carpets of curving jungle vines and polished cement. And proceed with caution: The floor occasionally slopes unexpectedly.

“If you don’t pay attention, you’ll fall,” says Sterkel, explaining how an uneven floor is a humbling attitude adjustment. “You have to lose control to pay attention to what you feel, emotionally and spiritually.”

The Argentine native, a former painter with no formal architectural background, constructed the curvaceous, womblike IK Lab on the site of his eco-conscious resort Azulik (a portmanteau of the Spanish word for “blue” and the Mayan word for “wind”) with a deep reverence for Mother Nature: No trees were cut, and the amorphous structure sits on stilts so that local wildlife can still pass below. Light permeates both the walls of vines reinforced by transparent fiberglass and the grand, misshapen portico doors—all of which normally spells disaster for showing art.

“This is the counter model of the standard gallery,” says IK Lab director Santiago Rumney Guggenheim, since curators typically prefer the reliable blank canvas of straight white walls. But when Rumney Guggenheim moved to Tulum in January (having grown up in Paris and lived in New York, where he temporarily had a gallery of his own), he immediately proposed that Sterkel turn the site into a gallery.

“When I walked into the space, it reminded me that in 1948, Peggy [Guggenheim, his great-grandmother] had opened a gallery in New York called Art of This Century, and the walls were curved,” he says. (The family legacy of difficult architecture also includes the curving walls of the Frank Lloyd Wright’s New York building, for starters, or the cavernous, billowing ones of Frank Gehry’s Bilbao). “I saw it as a challenge,” he adds. “You have to rethink how you’re going to put together a show.”

On Friday, IK Lab opens its first exhibition: “Alignments,” in which Rumney Guggenheim makes use of the unusual space by hanging nearly-ten-foot-long sculptures by Artur Lescher from the cavernous ceiling and illuminating neon works by Margo Trushina. In an adjacent 39-foot-high dome, Tatiana Trouvée’s 250 Points Towards Infinity comprises suspended pendulums pointing at 250 different points on the ground.

Beyond this inaugural show, the duo’s vision is farther reaching, including art programs for local children, and a multidisciplinary residency for aspiring artists, fashion designers, chefs, musicians, and more now under construction off-site deep in the jungle. “The artist will be developing his or her work as a resident taking in consideration and being affected by what’s happening around them, walking barefoot, touching different textures and exchanging ideas,” says Sterkel, who calls Tulum “a Mayan paradise.”

“They’ll make a playful space of creativity and sharing and playful and everyone is learning,” he adds. “This is my dream there.”

12 Hour Flight Time | Methanol Powered Drones

  • Developers of FY-36 say they overcame ‘tons of problems’ to create alcohol-fuelled battery that allows 15kg (33lb)6 drone to fly for up to 12 hours
  • With 15 test flights under their belt, Chinese team achieve methanol-powered flight before German company
Scientists working on a drone development programme created a “game-changing” methanol-powered fuel system that kept their UAV in the air for 12 hours.

It took them more than two years to get the FY-36 unmanned aerial vehicle to the flying prototype stage, said Zhang Wenyu, general manager of Feye UAV Technology, a Tianjin-based drone manufacturer that collaborated with the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, under the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in northeastern Liaoning province.

At 15 kilograms (33 pounds), the low-noise FY-36 can be lifted by an adult or transported in a pickup truck, and designers said its hybrid aerodynamic shape – with four vertical propellers – can allow it to cruise at speeds as high as 90km/h, or 56mph.

With a payload of up to three kilograms, the FY-36 was designed to perform tasks such as power line inspection, search and rescue missions, geological mapping and military intelligence gathering, but its power source is what stands out.

Developers say the FY-36 has been flight-tested 15 times. Photo: Handout
Developers say the FY-36 has been flight-tested 15 times. Photo: Handout

Its methanol fuel cell was designed to generate enough electricity for a flight time of up to 12 hours per charge. By comparison, a low-cost lithium-powered Chinese DJI Spark “selfie drone” can stay in the air for 15 minutes, while the professional-grade DJI Inspire 2 can barely top half an hour using a lithium-ion battery pack.

“There were tons of problems which had to be solved on the ground” before the FY-36 took its maiden flight in November, Zhang – who described the technology as a “game-changer” – said on Monday.

Jolllof Rice w. Yewande Komolafe

“We don’t say a dish is spicy — we say it has pepper.” Yewande Komolafe is a recipe writer who grew up in Lagos and found herself searching for the heat and flavor of Nigerian food in the U.S. She picked the 10 essential Nigerian recipes, and this jollof rice was No. 1. It’s smoky and has a spicy kick. Get the jollof rice recipe: http://nyti.ms/2IWv15R Yewande’s 10 Essential Nigerian Recipes: https://nyti.ms/2Jc3gFf Photo Credits: Photography by Johnny Miller Food styling by Rebecca Jurkevich Prop styling by Paige Hicks —————————————— SUBSCRIBE: https://bit.ly/2MrEFxh INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/2DqJMuD FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/2MrTjEC TWITTER: http://bit.ly/2RZB6ng PINTEREST: http://bit.ly/2W44xng About NYT Cooking: All the food that’s fit to eat (yes, it’s an official New York Times production).

Making Mushrooms Meaty

On my cooking show today I welcome my friend Chef Derek Sarno & what we create is simply INCREDIBLE 🌎 SUBSCRIBE –

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCF-A… 💬

All the ingredients you will need – https://www.avantgardevegan.com/recip…

🔔 Dereks youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCF4F…

📚 My New Plants Only Kitchen Cookbook – https://www.smarturl.it/plantsonlykit…

📚 Vegan 100 Cookbook – https://www.smarturl.it/Vegan100 📚 Vegan Christmas Cookbook – https://www.smarturl.it/Veganchristmas

⚡️ NEW MERCH – https://www.avantgardevegan.com/store INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/avantgardev…

TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/avantgardevegan

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/avantgardevegan

Daily Focus 050

As promised I go over the most recent book knocked off the list Writing Down The Bones by Natalie Goldberg. Two quick  entheogenic stories and the lessons that come with it. Flying planes on Mushrooms and The pendulum of emotions. Tune in and listen close.

 

Quotes Of The Day

The tongue carries that which is light

Over discipline makes a child stunted

Too Long Honest, Too Long Poor

Hell itself holds dishonor in horror

 

Wildlife Photographer Roie Galitz

Roie Galitz considers himself an ambassador for the creatures he photographs, capturing their intimate moments in hopes of inspiring conservation

Roie Galitz’s adventurous spirit has quite literally driven him to the ends of the earth. He has made several excursions to the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard and the ice sheets of Antarctica, as well as the snowy tundra of Norway and the wild waters of Kamchatka, Russia — all in the hopes of capturing some of the earth’s most elusive creatures.

Although the photographer hails from Tel Aviv and first fell in love with wildlife photography in the sweltering savannahs of Tanzania, Galitz says he prefers to work in the cold—even when that can mean temperatures as low as 40 degrees below zero. He layers up multiple pairs of long johns, fleece shirts and the thickest wool socks he can find. On top of all of that, he wears an eight-pound Arctic suit. “When you’re cold, you can always put on an extra layer,” he says. “But when you’re hot, there is a legal limit to how much you can remove.”

Read the full in depth article at Smithsonian

Pixar’s Online Story Telling Course

In one of the best examples of free education this year, Pixar has released a six-part online course called ‘The Art of Storytelling’. 

Written by DEREK BERES

Humans tell stories. Many of us live interesting lives; developing a way to deliver the narrative is to our advantage. Others lead less than adventurous existences, and so stories become transcendent vehicles for our imagination. Epic mythologies and religions are nothing but collections of stories that inspire and transform us.

The ways we tell stories is always changing. Oral cultures evolved into literary cultures. Theater is an ancient art. Movies offered a visual way to tell stories that painting and photography never could, even if those pictures were worth thousands of words.

One of the greatest and most popular storytelling machines of today, Pixar, is celebrating, as well as helping evolve, the story with its new initiative, The Art of Storytelling. This free online program is for children and adults who want to wrap their head around what it takes to produce stories ready for the screen.

Peter Docter kicks off the series discussing the art of telling a good story. As director of Monsters, Inc., Inside Out, and Up, he’s directly responsible for some of Pixar’s biggest hits. At first glance his advice seems rather benign: write about what you know.

Our imaginations are wild. Docter says if you envision car chases, monsters, and explosions, use them, but in a context that’s connectable with others. He uses Monsters Inc. as an example. The first drafts were failures—and each film can take thirty or more drafts. The problem was that the movie was about a monster that scares kids.

The film needed an emotional hook. As Docter was learning how to become a father at that time, the movie became about a monster raising a child. The storyline was universal; the audience was able to connect more. And what’s the point of telling a story other than to relate to others?

Not all stories are so simple. Movies can be propaganda and exploitative as well. The Pixar team in this program focuses on relatability in six parts:

We Are All Storytellers

Character

Structure

Visual Language

Filmmaking grammar

Storyboarding

Valeria LaPointe, a Pixar story artist, reminds watchers that the process—editing, debating, collaborating, refining—is what makes a movie watchable. A series of activities offers students of this program an opportunity to flex their imaginations in such a way. These include the ability to express a memory in a way that excites the listener, identifying your three ‘desert island’ movies and finding the connective tissue binding them together, and understanding what draws you to your favorite film characters.

In partnership with the Khan Academy, Pixar will be releasing similar free programs throughout the year. Next up is an installment on character creation. There’s a reason Pixar has been so successful. Revealing its secrets in order to inspire others to create—and perhaps one day become the type of artist the company recruits—is one of the best uses of free online education this year. 

Here’s Lawrence Levy, former CFO of Pixar, on productivity and mindfulness:

Derek’s next book, Whole Motion: Training Your Brain and Body For Optimal Health, will be published on 7/4/17 by Carrel/Skyhorse Publishing.

He is based in Los Angeles. Stay in touch on Facebook and Twitter.

A resource for information and visual manifestation

%d bloggers like this: