Rest in Power Dr. Llaila Olela Afrika

 

I have done work with many healers and ALL give thanks and praise to Dr Llaila Afrika. His work will be carried on with each and every student his wisdom has touched. Take the time and watch some of his work and pick up his books to learn more about health and wellness holistically.

African Holistic Health by Afrika, Llaila O.

The Textbook of African Holistic Health by Afrika, Llaila O

Do a search and learn!

Pizza of The GOAT

Another banger for your young tongues taste buddies. This is one of my favorite types of flat bread pizza. I’ll admit I didn’t intend this bread to be flat but I had this dough stashed in the fridge for a day or two. I plan on making some dough that shall rise in less than 7 days. I called this Pizza for the Goat (Greatest of All Time) because it holds my favorite cheese Goat cheese. Normally I stay away from pizza and cheese but every 3 months I indulge.

The recipe for this joint is quite easy to make. You will need Shiitake Mushrooms, Tomato sauce Habenro or Red peppers and Goat cheese. You can make your own dough or grab some from the store. Hopefully all the panic shoppers left you a little flour or pre made pizza dough.

Once you grab your ingredients. Make the dough, spread the sauce. Chop up piece of the goat cheese spread accordingly then add peppers and mushrooms. You can add some salt and pepper to top it off. Bake for about 10-15 minutes and walaaaa

Enjoy, I’ll take some more in depth photos in the future. Simple pizza simple pictures.

Daily Focus 078

I think we all have that “If I knew moment” at one point or another.  Hindsight is always 2020.. see what i did there. Today we discuss the intricacies of thirst trapping. A good hunter keeps a few different types of traps. Ever discriminate against someones choice of food? Yeah that can be me at times. Shoutout to Myco_Dogon_West the package arrived safely and right on time. Still out in nature listening and thinking in the language the birds speak. Suppressing dreams with green? At times the dreaming world can feel more real then the waking. Sleep well

Quotes Of The Day

There is nothing safe about sex there never will be

In the midst of memories moist, I miss your voice

I came upon no wine as wonderful as thirst

Honorable Mention 

Myco_DOGON_West 

 

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For more information on the liberation pack go to his page follow and DM

16 Fast Growing Vegetables That Will Give You a Harvest Quickly

Would you like to grow a vegetable garden but feel like it just takes way too long? Well, the amazing thing is, it doesn’t have to.

Instead, you can plant some faster-growing veggies and have some great fresh food options to choose from.

So if this sounds great to you, then you’ll want to stay tuned to this post.

16 Fast Growing Vegetables:

Here are the faster vegetable options that you can grow in your garden:

1. Arugula

Arugula

Arugula is a wonderful little green that has a peppery flavor to it. We grew it at our old homestead. It was a delicious addition to our perennial garden.

If you’d like to have a peppery green to toss in your salad, then you should consider growing this flavorful vegetable. All you’ll need to do is plant it, give it about a month to produce mature leaves, and then cut them when you’re ready to enjoy.

Then they’ll continue to grow back each year for your enjoyment.

Arugula can be grown annually in nearly all zones and can be harvested after 30 days.

2. Spinach

Spinach

Spinach was one of the first things I ever tried growing. I did so because of how fast it grew and how simple it was to grow.

Basically, you directly sow the seeds into good quality dirt. Then you’ll need to water and wait. Before you know it, in about 4-6 weeks, you’ll have fresh spinach.

Spinach can be a nice addition to any salad, or you could prepare the spinach fresh like in this recipe.

Spinach can be grown in Zones 3-9, and the leaves can already be harvested 6 weeks after planting.

3. Baby Carrots

baby carrots

Baby carrots taste delicious, are a great snack, are great to cook with, and don’t take as long as full-sized carrots because they don’t have to grow to be as large.

So if you enjoy carrots and want them quickly, then you’ll definitely want to pick the baby carrot variety. Plant them in the ground, or in a container garden for versatility.

Either way, be sure to directly sow the seeds in quality dirt. Then in about 30 days, you’ll have your first harvest.

Baby carrots can be grown in zones 4-10 and can be ready within a month from sowing.

4. Radishes

Radish

Radishes are probably one of the fastest plants you can grow. They are also super simple to grow as well.

If you’d like to try and grow your own vegetables, radishes are excellent fast-growing vegetables to start with. You’ll directly sow these seeds in quality soil.

Radishes can be harvested in about 22-50 days and can be grown in zones 2-10.

5. Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Cucumbers are a very versatile plant to grow. You can make lots of delicious recipes with them. You can start with eating them fresh.

Then they could be a great addition to a salad. When you are “cucumbered out”, you can start making pickles with the fresh cucumbers.

But be advised that cucumbers like to run so you’ll need to either place them on a trellis or give them plenty of space to grow.

Cucumbers can be grown in zones 4-11 and if you want to make pickles the baby cucumbers can be harvested as early as 50 days after planting.

6. Beets

Beets

Beets are one of those vegetables that you either like or you don’t. But even if you don’t like the actual beet itself, you may enjoy the greens that come from the plant.

So either way, it is a great vegetable to grow if you’d like to have a harvest in a hurry. It is good to grow in the spring or when we are heading into fall because they can withstand a little heat, but don’t like the super-hot temperatures we often experience during summer.

Beets can be harvested in around 50 days, however, the greens can be harvested from 30 days. They grow well in zones 2-10.

7. Bush Beans

bush beans

Bush beans are my favorite kind of bean. They grow beautifully in the garden, they are easier to prepare when canning green beans, and they also produce a quicker harvest.

So if you love tender green beans, then consider planting a bush bean variety. All you’ll need to do is directly sow the seeds into quality dirt.

Then over time, with water and sunlight, they will produce a beautiful green bean bush.

Bush beans will be ready in around 40-65 days and grow well in zones 3-10.

8. Bok Choy

Bok Choy

Bok Choy is a fun plant. It looks fun, and it is even fun to say its name.

But it is also a great plant to grow because it can produce a mature harvest in around 30 days. If that isn’t a super-fast plant, I’m not sure what is.

If you are looking for something different to grow that will produce a fast harvest, then you should definitely consider Bok Choy.

Bok Choy grows well in zones 4-7 and individual leaves can be harvested after 21 days, or the whole head 45-60 days after planting.

9. Lettuce

Lettuce

Lettuce is such a versatile plant. There are so many different varieties to choose from that you can have a different flavor and crunch with each one.

But the great thing about lettuce is that it is hearty so it can grow in colder temperatures, and it also doesn’t take very long to produce a mature harvest.

If you want something healthy, green, and fast, then you should definitely consider planting lettuce.

Depending on the Lettuce variety, harvest can be about 30-60 days after planting, ideally in zones 4-9.

10. Summer Squash – Zucchini

zucchini-squash

Summer squash is probably one of my favorite vegetables to enjoy during the warmer months. It tastes delicious, is easy to grow, and produces quickly too.

So if you need to learn how to grow your own squash, here is a great resource to help you along the way.

But a quick overview is basically, you directly sow the seeds in quality soil, water them, and wait for them to grow and produce.

However, you’ll want to be sure to harvest your squash or zucchini when they are young for better flavor.

Zucchini, a Summer Squash variety, grows best in zones 3-10 and can be harvested almost daily from day 35 onwards as they grow so quickly.

Read the full article and get all the veggies at MorningChores 

Salmon x Wild Rice x Creamy Kale Sauces

Now that I have less people and more food to shoot I can eat 2 fish with one fork. Up first on the menu was Salmon. I like to keep it simple with fish, steam, salt and pepper is all you really need anything else is extra in my book. Rarely do I whip up cream type sauces for my meals but a can of coconut milk caught my eye and the idea sparked. This was a delicious meal, the spicy lentil blend and cabbage really brought it all together. Baked yam for sweet delicious vibrancy on the plate and walaaaa

Ingredients | Recipe

Salmon | Steam x Salt x Pepper

Creamy Kale: sautéed onions and garlic first with sesame seed oil. Once that is to your liking add the butter let that sizzle and melt then add on the coconut milk. I seasoned with curry, salt and pepper. Then add Kale and cook down until it’s the consistency you would like it to be.

Spicy Lentils: Boil a pot of lentils. I like putting seasoning (Berbere, Salt, Pepper) in the water and in the second process before blending. I sautee onions. garlic, habanero pepper in coconut oil. Sometimes I let the garlic and onion charr a little bit before adding the oil. Once the oil is added I will add in the lentils then season with more Berbere. The lentils are done already so at this point cut the heat and take all of what is in the pan and put it in the blender. You can eat this blend cold or hot. I prefer it cold.

Baked Sweet Potatoe | Butter, Coconut Sugar, honey drizzle

Wild Rice and Steamed Cabbage

Enjoy

John C Lilly On Consciousness and Satori

Dr John Cunningham Lilly (January 6, 1915 – September 30, 2001) was an American physician, neuroscientist, psychoanalyst, psychonaut, philosopher, writer and inventor. He was a researcher of the nature of consciousness using mainly isolation tanks, dolphin communication, and psychedelic drugs, sometimes in combination. Lilly was a physician and psychoanalyst. He made contributions in the fields of biophysics, neurophysiology, electronics, computer science, and neuroanatomy. He invented and promoted the use of an isolation tank as a means of sensory deprivation. He also attempted communication between humans and dolphins. His work helped the creation of the United States Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972. Lilly’s eclectic career began as a conventional scientist doing research for universities and government. Gradually, however, he began researching unconventional topics. He published several books and had two Hollywood movies based partly on his work. He also developed theories for flotation. Lilly published 19 books, including The Center of the Cyclone, which describes his own LSD experiences, and Man and Dolphin and The Mind of the Dolphin, which describe his work with dolphins. In the 1980s Lilly directed a project that attempted to teach dolphins a computer-synthesised language. Lilly designed a future “communications laboratory” that would be a floating living room where humans and dolphins could chat as equals and develop a common language. Lilly envisioned a time when all killing of whales and dolphins would cease, “not from a law being passed, but from each human understanding innately that these are ancient, sentient earth residents, with tremendous intelligence and enormous life force. Not someone to kill, but someone to learn from.” In the 1990s Lilly moved to Maui, Hawaii, where he lived most of the remainder of his life. Lilly’s literary rights and scientific discoveries were owned by Human Software, Inc., while his philanthropic endeavors were owned by the Human Dolphin Foundation. The John C. Lilly Research Institute, Inc. continues to research topics of interest to Lilly and carry on his legacy.

Daily Focus 077

 

As promised I discuss the lesson learned from some of the last breaths. We are going to need a license to go outside soon, thoughts from a paranoid mind. Lightly discuss what I think about the old classic Aliens 2. Two cannabis tales of another narrow escape from the law after they kick in the bathroom door as we blaze a nice spliff. Being bold works best sometime. Time for higher learning

Quotes of The Day 

 Love is a hole in the heart

I teach my sighs to lengthen  into songs

A kiss can be a comma a question mark and exclamation point thats basic spelling that every women ought to know

Instrumental : DG33

Evidence of Stone Melting / Geopolymer Technology?

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Hey guys, I am at the Koh Ker Pyramid in Cambodia, and today we are going to look at a mysterious stone technology called Knobs.You see this protrusion here,this is very fascinating to see. Why does it have a projection like a door knob? If you look at the neighboring blocks, they don’t have this protrusion, but this block does. What is the purpose of this knob, why was it created more than a 1000 years ago? Perhaps you may think this is just an exception. So when I explore this level of the pyramid, this is not the ground level, I am walking on one of the steps of this stepped pyramid, again look at this block. See that block which has a plant growing on top of it, that is the block which has a knob. It clearly has a protrusion, a bump facing outside. Why were these created, what is the purpose of them? Let me show you another Temple in India, this is the famous Brihadeeswarar Temple in Thanjavur. This is also built around the same time as the Koh Ker Pyramid, this is also at least a thousand years old, this is also a Shiva temple, and this is also a Pyramid, some fascinating coincidences, even though both of them are separated by about 3000 miles. But perhaps the biggest coincidence is their giant lingams, the lingam at Thanjavur temple is 13 feet tall from the ground, and it also goes underground for many feet, and remember I talked about the Giant Crystal Lingam which existed in Koh Ker Pyramid. But let us go back to the mystery of knobs. We are able to see knobs in this temple as well. I shot this in 2013, because it has some very very intriguing details. This is all solid granite, huge blocks perfectly fit together, you cannot even insert a needle between the blocks, they look as though they are molded and assembled. But look at the knobs. I noticed something strange about how they were set up. If the walls have no carvings or inscriptions, then we can see a lot of knobs. Here, look, you can see a cluster of knobs on these walls. The entire wall is full of blocks with knobs. But if the wall was designated to have carvings or inscriptions, then there are no knobs at all. They are perfectly smooth. The more I observe this, the more I find this to be true. Another fascinating detail, look at this wall. No knobs at the eye level, but the stones with knobs are used where people would not normally see them. It appears that the stone blocks with knobs were used in unimportant places, as though they are defective pieces from a mass manufacturing company. What do I mean by this? Today, let us say you want to build a nice big house and you mass produce 50,000 bricks and you end up with about 500 bricks which are deformed or defective, what would you do? You don’t want to throw away 500 bricks, so you would use them in unimportant places or in places where they won’t be seen. This is exactly what we see in this temple. The blocks with knobs are used in Unimportant or places where they won’t be noticed. And you may think, wow that’s a lot of knobs, but the stone blocks with knobs just make up 1 or 2% of the temple. And these knobs are not only found in Cambodia and India, they are found in Egypt, Peru, Turkey and in almost all ancient megalithic sites. You can see these knobs in any ancient site, even though the purpose of this has been a mystery, until now. Mainstream archeology gives a strange answer to this, experts say these knobs were cut, while the stones were quarried. Why? So they could put ropes underneath the stones and lift them. But when we carefully observe the position of the knobs, many of them are not symmetrical, if you take this stone for example, and put a rope underneath these knobs, the stone would tip forward or to the side.Many of the knobs are not symmetrical and it would be impossible to use them for putting ropes underneath and lifting them. A lot of these knobs are also too small, you cannot put ropes underneath this knob for example, the knob is just too small, even to put your finger underneath and lift it.Archeologists don’t have an answer for this.And then, there is another question that should have popped into your head already. If these knobs were cut for the purpose of lifting, , then all the stone blocks should have these knobs. But they don’t. Why don’t all the blocks have these knobs? The mainstream explanation makes no sense. This explanation is quite simply, wrong. Let us take a look at it from the engineering perspective. Why we were these knobs created?

 

19 Edible Plants Found In Nature

So you’re stranded in the wilderness. You consumed the last nub of your Clif Bar two days ago, and now you’re feeling famished. Civilization is still several days away, and you need to keep up your strength. The greenery all around you is looking more and more appetizing. But what to nibble on? Some plants will keep you alive and are chock full of essential vitamins and minerals, while some could make you violently ill….or even kill you.

Which of course makes proper identification absolutely critical.

Below we’ve given a primer on 19 common edible wild plants. Look them over and commit the plants to memory. If you’d like to discover even more edible wild plants, we suggest checking out the SAS Survival Handbook and the U.S. Army Survival Manual.

In the coming months, we’ll be publishing articles on edible wild roots, berries, and fungi. So stay tuned.

Plants to Avoid

If you can’t clearly identify a plant and you don’t know if it’s poisonous, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Steer clear from a plant if it has:

  • Milky or discolored sap
  • Spines, fine hairs, or thorns
  • Beans, bulbs, or seeds inside pods
  • Bitter or soapy taste
  • Dill, carrot, parsnip, or parsley-like foliage
  • “Almond” scent in the woody parts and leaves
  • Grain heads with pink, purplish, or black spurs
  • Three-leaved growth pattern

Many toxic plants will exhibit one or more of the above characteristics. Bear in mind that some of the plants we suggest below have some of these attributes, yet they’re still edible. The characteristics listed are just guidelines for when you’re not confident about what you’re dealing with. If you want to be completely sure that an unknown plant is edible, and you have a day or two to spare, you can always perform the Universal Edibility Test.

Amaranth (Amaranthus retroflexus and other species)

Amaranth Amaranthus retroflexus flower edible plants

Native to the Americas but found on most continents, amaranth is an edible weed. You can eat all parts of the plant, but be on the look out for spines that appear on some of the leaves. While not poisonous, amaranth leaves do contain oxalic acid and may contain large amounts of nitrates if grown in nitrate-rich soil. It’s recommended that you boil the leaves to remove the oxalic acid and nitrates. Don’t drink the water after you boil the plant. With that said, you can eat the plant raw if worse comes to worst.

Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis)

wild Asparagus bunch along dirt road edible plants

The vegetable that makes your pee smell funny grows in the wild in most of Europe and parts of North Africa, West Asia, and North America. Wild asparagus has a much thinner stalk than the grocery-store variety. It’s a great source of source of vitamin C, thiamine, potassium, and vitamin B6. Eat it raw or boil it like you would your asparagus at home.

Burdock (Arctium lappa)

Burdock Arctium lappa common edible plants

Medium to large-sized plant with big leaves and purplish thistle-like flower heads. The plant is native to the temperate areas of the Eastern Hemisphere; however, it has been naturalized in parts of the Western Hemisphere as well. Burdock is actually a popular food in Japan. You can eat the leaves and the peeled stalks of the plant either raw or boiled. The leaves have a bitter taste, so boiling them twice before eating is recommended to remove the bitterness. The root of the plant can also be peeled, boiled, and eaten.

Cattail (Typha)

Cattail Typha common edible plants in wild

Known as cattails or punks in North America and bullrush and reedmace in England, the typhagenus of plants is usually found near the edges of freshwater wetlands. Cattails were a staple in the diet of many Native American tribes. Most of a cattail is edible. You can boil or eat raw the rootstock, or rhizomes, of the plant. The rootstock is usually found underground. Make sure to wash off all the mud. The best part of the stem is near the bottom where the plant is mainly white. Either boil or eat the stem raw. Boil the leaves like you would spinach. The corn dog-looking female flower spike can be broken off and eaten like corn on the cob in the early summer when the plant is first developing. It actually has a corn-like taste to it.

Clovers (Trifolium)

Clovers Trifolium close up common edible plants in wild

Lucky you — clovers are actually edible. And they’re found just about everywhere there’s an open grassy area. You can spot them by their distinctive trefoil leaflets. You can eat clovers raw, but they taste better boiled.

Chicory (Cichorium intybus)

Chicory cichorium intybus in wild common edible plants

You’ll find chicory growing in Europe, North America, and Australia. It’s a bushy plant with small blue, lavender, and white flowers. You can eat the entire plant. Pluck off the young leaves and eat them raw or boil them. The chicory’s roots will become tasty after boiling. And you can pop the flowers in your mouth for a quick snack.

Chickweed (Stellaria media)

Chickweed Stellaria media in wild common edible plants

You’ll find this herb in temperate and arctic zones. The leaves are pretty hefty, and you’ll often find small white flowers on the plant. They usually appear between May and July. You can eat the leaves raw or boiled. They’re high in vitamins and minerals.

Curled Dock (Rumex crispus)

curled dock plant in wild common edible plants

ADVERTISING

You can find curled dock in Europe, North America, South America, and Australia. It’s distinguished by a long, bright red stalk that can reach heights of three feet. You can eat the stalk raw or boiled. Just peel off the outer layers first. It’s recommend that you boil the leaves with several changes of water in order to remove its naturally bitter taste.

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

dandelion close up plant in wild common edible plants

Sure, it’s an obnoxious weed on your perfectly mowed lawn, but when you’re out in the wild this little plant can save your life. The entire plant is edible — roots, leaves, and flower. Eat the leaves while they’re still young; mature leaves taste bitter. If you do decide to eat the mature leaves, boil them first to remove their bitter taste. Boil the roots before eating as well. You can drink the water you boiled the roots in as a tea and use the flower as a garnish for your dandelion salad.

Field Pennycress (Thalspi vulgaris)

field pennycress plant in wild common edible plants

ADVERTISING

Field pennycress is a weed found in most parts of the world. Its growing season is early spring to late winter. You can eat the seeds and leaves of field pennycress raw or boiled. The only caveat with field pennycress is not to eat it if it’s growing in contaminated soil. Pennycress is a hyperaccumulator of minerals, meaning it sucks up any and all minerals around it. General rule is don’t eat pennycress if it’s growing by the side of the road or is near a Superfund site.

Fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium)

fireweed plant in wild common edible plants

This pretty little plant is found primarily in the Northern Hemisphere. You can identify fireweed by its purple flower and the unique structure of the leaves’ veins; the veins are circular rather than terminating on the edges of the leaves. Several Native American tribes included fireweed in their diet. It’s best eaten young when the leaves are tender. Mature fireweed plants have tough and bitter tasting leaves. You can eat the stalk of the plant as well. The flowers and seeds have a peppery taste. Fireweed is a great source of vitamins A and C.

Green Seaweed (Ulva lactuca)

green seaweed plant in wild common edible plants

If you’re ever shipwrecked on a deserted island, fish the waters near the beach for some green seaweed. This stuff is found in oceans all over the world. After you pull green seaweed from the water, rinse with fresh water if available and let it dry. You can eat it raw or include it in a soup. Or if you’re particularly enterprising, catch a fish with your homemade spear and use the seaweed to make sushi rolls, sans rice.

Kelp (Alaria esculenta)

kelp plant in wild common edible plants

Kelp is another form of seaweed. You can find it in most parts of the world. Eat it raw or include it in a soup. Kelp is a great source of folate, vitamin K, and lignans.

Plantain (Plantago)

plantain plant in wild common edible plants

Found in all parts of the world, the plantain plant (not to be confused with the banana-like plantain) has been used for millennia by humans as a food and herbal remedy for all sorts of maladies. You can usually find plantains in wet areas like marshes and bogs, but they’ll also sprout up in alpine areas. The oval, ribbed, short-stemmed leaves tend to hug the ground. The leaves may grow up to about 6″ long and 4″ wide. It’s best to eat the leaves when they’re young. Like most plants, the leaves tend to get bitter tasting as they mature. Plantain is very high in vitamin A and calcium. It also provides a bit of vitamin C.

Read the full article at TheArtOfManliness

Secret Science Hidden behind Ancient Holes? Mystery of Preah Vihear Temple

Hey guys, in the last video, I showed you strange holes drilled into many of the stone blocks of this 1000-year-old temple known as Preah Vihear in Cambodia. There are many different sizes of holes cut into the rocks, and the purpose of these holes has been a mystery, until now. To decode this, we need to look at these ancient floor tiles. Each tile is a square slab of sandstone, but in the center, there is a circular hole. Surprisingly, these holes are not present in one or 2 slabs, or even some tiles, this is what we see in this entire area. Each square tile is of the same size as every other tile, and there is one hole drilled in the center of every tile. Were ancient builders mass manufacturing tiles, just like what we do today? How else can we explain this kind of replication? You can see that the entire area covered with tiles, has the exact same feature. If you walk on them looking at these tiles, it is like walking through a mass manufacturing setup. But why was the hole in the center necessary? Archeologists give a very simple explanation. Stone blocks are not easily moveable, because we cannot get a grip on them. So when ancient builders quarried stone blocks from mountains, they made holes, so that builders could insert a stick and move them easily. In fact, there are documentaries that explain how multiple holes were drilled in rectangular blocks, so they could be moved by men easily. This seems like a convincing explanation, But do all stone blocks have these holes? Let us go to another area in the same temple complex and look at the floor tiling. Look at these stone blocks on the ground, no holes on them at all, but look what they have done to the surface. Here you can see this work, this is to make sure that you don’t fall. (Rug for grip). Here, here and look.. all the way. This is all grip. This entire place is made of these rocks, where the surface was deliberately made rough. They either used sandpaper, acid treatment or something strange device to make it rough. This is incredible. Yes, today we have rugs, even archeology department uses rugs or carpets so people don’t fall, but this rug is 1000-year-old guys, and it will last for eternity, unlike the modern rugs which will disintegrate after 10 years. This is why we love ancient builders right, they built things that even time can’t destroy But if ancient builders had to put holes in the floor tiles in that area, why do these blocks don’t have holes? How were these blocks moved without the holes? I am not satisfied with the theory of mainstream archeologists; the holes must have a different purpose. When I examine the walls, the holes are very, very strange and go against these standard explanations. In documentaries, we are told that the holes are drilled through the blocks and wooden sticks are driven through them, and two people would push or pull on both sides. However, none of these holes go through the entire depth. They are very shallow, and I doubt if they are deep enough even to put a stick on them and make them move. To facilitate movement, holes must be drilled symmetrically, ie., either on the ends or at the very center. But the holes in these blocks are weird, there are a bunch of holes in one corner, while the other corner has no holes at all. Some blocks have a lot of holes, and other similar-sized blocks have very little number of holes or even no holes at all. And one more thing, these multiple holes defeat the purpose, the temple walls are supposed to be ornate and are supposed to look good. The holes actually make them look bad. So the holes definitely served some other important purpose. But we don’t know what it is. But the mystery gets deeper as I explore another temple in the complex. There are some very very strange and unexplainable features. Look, these are not small little holes, they are huge, gigantic holes, not just one or two, but a series of them and they are drilled on the floor. These holes are too large for driving any stick and moving them, these holes had a very different purpose. And why so many holes? Remember I showed you similar holes on the bedrock of Ellora Caves in India? Ellora caves also has these weird holes on the ground. Those holes were deliberately made for ventilation purposes for the secret underground city which lies underneath.

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A resource for information and visual manifestation