Mung bean stew with squash and coconut milk

mung-bean-soup-top

A delicious Dish!

Ingredients:

* 1 cup split and hulled mung beans
* 1 tablespoon organic coconut oil or organic ghee (Indian clarified butter)
* 1 onion, peeled and diced
* 3 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
* 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced
* 1 Serrano or other hot chile pepper (seeded for a less spicy stew)
* 6 cups homemade turkey, chicken or vegetable stock or water
* 2 cups peeled, seeded and cubed butternut squash (or peeled and diced white or sweet potato)
* 1-2 large carrot, chopped
* 2 cups Swiss chard or collard greens, tough stems removed, and then chopped
* 2-3 teaspoons jaggery or brown sugar
* 2-3 teaspoons garam masala
* 1/2 teaspoon tumeric
* 1 can of organic unsweetened whole coconut milk- optional
* 1/2 teaspoon sea salt, or to taste (the amount of salt needed will depend on how salty your stock is)

directions:

1. Run cold water over mung beans in a colander. Drain and set aside.

2. Warm coconut oil or ghee in a large pot. Add onion, garlic, ginger and chile pepper and saute until fragrant. Add stock or water.

3. Add the mung beans and the squash, then add the rest of the vegetables and the spices. Stir well to combine all the ingredients and bring to a boil.

4. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 45 minutes to 1 hour, stirring occasionally, and adding more liquid if it becomes too thick. Remove from heat when everything is soft and cooked through.

5. Add optional coconut milk and stir well to combine and heat through. Add salt, taste, and adjust seasonings before serving.

Source: http://www.healthygreenkitchen.com/mung-bean-stew-with-butternut-squash.html

Scientists find new brain area for anxiety

Researchers have discovered that an area of the brain that was previously assumed to dampen response to stress, in fact does the opposite and directly promotes anxiety. In reporting their findings in the journal Cell, the investigators add a new dimension to the science of anxiety

They describe how they found a brain circuit that connects an area called the lateral septum (LS) with other brain structures in a way that directly affects anxiety.

Corresponding author David Anderson, the Seymour Benzer Professor of Biology at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, says:

“Our study has identified a new neural circuit that plays a causal role in promoting anxiety states. Part of the reason we lack more effective and specific drugs for anxiety is that we don’t know enough about how the brain processes anxiety. This study opens up a new line of investigation into the brain circuitry that controls anxiety.”

Figures from the National Institutes of Mental Health show over 18% of adults in the US are affected by anxiety disorders, where people experience excessive worry or tension, often leading to physical symptoms.

Although previous research has focused primarily on the amygdala as being the region in the brain that processes anxiety, Prof. Anderson and colleagues had a hunch that the LS might also be involved, so they decided to study it using mice.

Full Article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/272114.php

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