Tag Archives: food

7 Conscious Altering Herbs

Herbs and plants are an integral part of the life that exists on our planet on every level.  Plants are our food, our medicine, and are also catalysts to the expansion of our consciousness.  Throughout our daily lives we are more likely to coast by using our automated behaviors and modes to experience our reality, but at night those boundaries are broken down and our spirits fly.  These 7 plant allies can stimulate our consciousness to expand opening us to alternate experiences of reality and new ways of perceiving our selves and surroundings;

ayurvedic plants that make you high

 

1- Xhosa Dream Root – Vivid and Prophetic Dreams
Silene Capensis, or Xhosa Dream root is most associated with the Xhosa people of South Africa who are knows to ingest this herb to induce vivid and prophetic dreams.  This herb is often used by the Xhosa in the initiation rites of shamans and is believed to open up pathways of communication to ones ancestors. It is believed that the ancestors are most likely to communicate in the dream state.  The root is ground into a powder which is mixed with water and drunk in the morning on an empty stomach.  The effects are apparently slow to be induced and will take effect by the nighttime.  According to entheology.com, “The effects of S. capensis usually manifest during sleep as prophetic lucid dream states that are rich with significance.  Individuals do not usually perceive any effects in the waking state, although one individual did report perceiving wavy lines of light in the air about twenty minutes after consuming the root.  The dream state is often compared to going under water by the Xhosa.  Interestingly enough, it is said that the plant has no effects on individuals who are not meant to be diviners.
(Image Source: Silene Capensis)
2- Celastrus Paniculatus – The Elixir of Life
This amazing herb is not only known to promote the incidence of lucid dreaming and dream recollection for those who take it, but has often been called the ‘intellect tree’ because of its long history of use in ayurvedic medicine as an herb to help with mental focus, longevity, and memory.  Users have reported that by adding 10-15 Celastrus paniculatus seeds into their daily regimen, they notice a marked improvement in cognitive function, ability to focus, and sharpness.
(Image Source: Celastrus-Paniculatus)
 3- Blue Lotus – Mind Body Spirit Herb
Blue Lotus was among the most sacred of plants to ancient Egyptins. It grew throughout Egypt where its consciousness-enhancing properties were well known and taken advantage of.  The Blue Lotus was associated with the origins of life and the divine perspective.  According to iamshaman.com the plant was used in Egypt to stimulate the sex drive and, “Egyptian medicinal practitioners also used this flower to stimulate blood flow, and as an anti-aging treatment.  The ancients worshipped Blue Lotus as a visionary plant and it was the symol for the origins of life.  When this flower was soaked in water or wine, and then ingested it acted as an intoxicant.”  Considered very sacred, the Blue Lotus was used to reach euphoric states of visionary consciousness.
(Image Source: Blue Lotus)
4- Wild Asparagus Root – Fly by Night
Wild Asparagus root, according to some old legends throughout Asia, allows the consciousness to fly during sleep.  Journeying into other dimensions and places while asleep are common associations with this adaptogenic herb.  Adaptogenic herbs help the body better adapt themselves to stresses that they face. This herb is also a respiratory and kidney tonic, helping to heal the body while letting the mind soar.
(Image Source: Asparagus Root)
5- African Dream Bean – Master Spirit Connections
Growing along the coasts of Madagascar, Southern Africa, Australia, and Asia, this common bean is used in a wide variety of ways by an array of people groups throughout the world.  Its uses vary from a skin treatment to a food given to teething babies to relieve pain.  However this bean’s most well-known and interesting use is its traditional use in South Africa to induce intense lucid-dreaming states in which a person is able to communicate with the spirit realm.  For its consciousness-altering properties, the meat inside the bean is eaten.
(Image Source: Dream Bean)
6- Mexican Tarragon – Grow a Garden of Herbs for Dreaming
Mexican Tarragon is commonly grown in gardens and used as an herb for flavoring in cooking. Also known as Mexican Marigold, its flowers are associated with Dia De Los Muertos celebrations and observances.  The herb can be used in a variety of ways to induce lucid dreaming from burning as incense, smoking before bedtime, or infused in water as a tea.
(Image Source:  Mexican Tarragon)
7- Mugwort – A Versatile Dreaming Herb
 
 Throughout the ages Mugwort has been a widely used herb in Europe associated with treating digestive or parasitic troubles and as a dream herb.  Mugwort, like Mexican Tarragon, can be smoked, burned as an incense, or drunk as a tea.  Mugwort is known to also stimulate lucid and meaningful dreams.  It can also cause things deep in the subconscious to be exposed during dream-time.
(Image Source: Mugwort Leaf)
Main Image Source: Juan Carlos Taminchi
This list originally appeared on quantumstones.com by Stephanie Lucas

Food = Lust = Sex ?

We sat down for a brief discussion about Food lust and sex!  We all have had cravings for certain foods men and women. So we decided to explore this general topic in open discussion.

This is what I picked up from it …

Specific foods cause you to feel a certain way….

There may be certain nutrients that you need in your body, causing you to feel a strong desire for a specific food.

There are fruits and foods that can be a aphrodisiac to some.

Men on a grain diet tend to be more fertile and want to pro create.

Note:  This video did have another person in it but Jane Doe would like to remain Jane Doe so her audio/video is missing  but this is generally what was said from Jane Doe

“According to WomensHealth.gov, pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) affects up to 85 percent of menstruating women. Whether you suffer from cramps, a heavy period or menstrual migraines, you may be able to alleviate your symptoms by eating foods rich in specific vitamins. Vitamins B, C, D and E can reduce the symptoms associated with PMS as well as promote a more regular and less painful menstrual cycle.”

Men also lose certain nutrients  when they ejaculate  …

“However, the biological purpose of the ejaculate yields some clues to why it contains a number of essential nutrients. Robin Baker, author of the interestingly-titled “Sperm Wars,” notes that the average ejaculation releases around 300 million viable sperm cells; these cells need certain nutrients to sustain their assault on the end prize, the ovum. It figures that the more you ejaculate, the higher your requirement for these particular vitamins and minerals.”

Zinc

Zinc plays an important role all over the body and makes an essential part of more than 80 enzymes. Dr. Michael Colgan, the New-Zealand born nutritionist and the author of the “Sports Nutrition Guide,” reports that zinc remains crucial for hormonal balance, cellular repair, immune system function and libido. He estimates that around one microgram of zinc leaves the body per ejaculation and explains that because only the body only absorbs 20 percent of dietary zinc the requirements for zinc increase by approximately 5 mg after each ejaculation. – Source Livestrong 

So the foods that you crave are signal to what you need in your body.

 

Nutritional Value of Octopus

Octopus, like nearly all seafood, is lean and low in calories. A 3-ounce serving of octopus has less than 150 calories and more than 25 grams of protein. Octopus is naturally low in fat, but it is high in cholesterol, which can be harmful if you consume too much. This type of seafood is full of several key nutrients, including trace minerals and vitamin B-12. Keep your serving of octopus healthy by opting for healthy low-fat cooking methods to avoid adding excessive fat and calories.

Fat and Cholesterol

One 3-ounce serving of octopus provides less than 2 grams of total fat — including less than .5 gram from saturated fat. This harmful fat increases low-density lipoprotein, or LDL cholesterol in your blood, upping your overall risk of heart disease. Saturated fat should make up less than 7 percent of your total calories. Since fats have 9 calories per gram, you can have up to 22 grams for a 2,000-calorie diet. The remaining fat grams should come from good monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. These heart-healthy fats, also called MUFAs and PUFAs, regulate blood cholesterol levels and lower your risk of heart disease. Octopus also contains cholesterol. While cholesterol is not a fat, it can boost your risk of heart disease, just like saturated fat, when you consume too much. Keep your total intake of cholesterol to under 200 milligrams per day to keep your heart healthy, explains the Cleveland Clinic. This serving of octopus has more than 80 milligrams of cholesterol.

Iron

Octopus is naturally high in iron, providing all of the necessary iron for men and nearly half of the recommended amount for women. Iron is a trace mineral, meaning you only need small amounts each day. This mineral is a carrier of oxygen and transports oxygen to cells, tissues and vital organs. Iron also plays a role in cell growth. Men need 8 milligrams of daily iron, while women require 18 milligrams. One 3-ounce portion of octopus offers more than 8 milligrams.

Selenium

Octopus provides more than your daily recommended amount of selenium. This trace mineral plays a role in protein metabolism during digestion. Selenium also acts as an antioxidant by ridding your body of damaging free radicals. When free radicals scavenge through your system, they feed on healthy cells and increase your risk of chronic disease. Antioxidants, like selenium, protect cells by neutralizing free radicals. You need 55 micrograms of daily selenium, the Linus Pauling Institute reports. One 3-ounce serving of octopus contains about 75 micrograms.

Vitamin B-12

Octopus exceeds your daily requirement of vitamin B-12. This vitamin is essential for metabolism, creating new red blood cells and supporting everyday brain functions. You need 2.4 micrograms of vitamin B-12 each day, says the Office of Dietary Supplements. Having a 3-ounce serving of octopus for dinner offers more than 30 micrograms. There are no adverse effects from consuming too much B-12, because your body excretes excess amounts through urine.

Cooking Tips

Thoroughly clean octopus before cooking it. Remove inedible parts such as eyes, beak, tentacles, intestines and ink sac. Thoroughly wash octopus to remove any sand particles. Your butcher can clean it for you if you are unsure about which parts to remove. Avoid unhealthy cooking methods, such as frying or sauteing in butter, to keep your fat and calorie intake to a minimum. Instead, use nonstick cooking spray to keep your cut of octopus from sticking to the grill or saute pan. Nonstick cooking spray does not have fat or calories. Grilling octopus adds a rich, smoky flavor that pairs well with grilled asparagus or squash. Another alternative is to saute octopus chunks and simmer them in seafood stock. Add onions, leeks and bay leaves to your pan and season the mixture lightly with salt and pepper. Drizzle the dish with fresh lemon juice before serving. These cooking methods keep your serving of octopus light and healthy.

 

Source: HealthyEating 

MicroWaves… Cancer for Convenience?

It’s a bit controversial, but you should know that using a microwave oven could be damaging your health. Swiss scientist Hans Hertel did independent research on microwave cooking that was once banned from publication by a court gag order demanded by an industry association. He was told to recant or be arrested. His findings were not favorable for microwave-oven users. Hertel’s research corroborated early Soviet Russian research that led to a ban on microwave ovens, which was lifted after the “iron curtain” fell to increase microwave oven sales.

Both Hans Hertel’s research and the Soviet Russian research went beyond the commonly accepted dangers of microwaves leaking into the immediate environment and lowering nutritional value of microwave-cooked foods – two very real consequences of using a microwave oven.

Molecules are Agitated and Damaged

Hertel explains how heat is produced from the inside out in microwaves:

“Technically produced microwaves are based on the principle of alternating current. Atoms, molecules and cells hit by this hard electromagnetic radiation are forced to reverse polarity 1 to 100 billion times a second.”

Hertel is quick to point out that microwaves from the sun don’t cause the same type of molecular damage because the sun emits direct current (DC) pulses, where microwave ovens are generated by alternating current (AC) that causes the rapid polarity shifts in molecules to torque and tear them.

There are no atoms, molecules or cells of any organic system able to withstand such a violent, destructive power for any extended period of time, not even in the low energy range of milliwatts.” Hertel continues, “This is how microwave cooking heat is generated – friction from this violence in water molecules. Structures of molecules are torn apart, molecules are forcefully deformed (called structural isomerism) and thus become impaired in quality.”

So it’s the water molecules in foods that are directly agitated first to produce frictional heat. Even worse, using a microwave oven for heating water for coffee or tea or for warming baby’s formula will create severely damaged molecules, which are carcinogenic. More on that later.

Gene Damage from Microwave Cooking

Besides these thermal modifications, there is direct damage to cell walls and genes from microwaves. Gene altering technology, which includes the biotech food industry, alters genes by weakening them with microwaves.

“The cells are actually broken, thereby neutralizing the electrical potentials – the very life of the cells – between the outer and inner sides of the cell membranes.”

Strange and unknown compounds are created by microwave energy’s penetration into organic matter. They’ve been called radiolytic compounds. Some scientists argue that normal cooking creates these as well. However, Hertel’s research has indicated that far more radiolytic compounds are created by microwave cooking.

Hertel used human trials to demonstrate that the food and liquids damaged from microwaving modifies the cellular activity in humans consuming them. In addition to creating lower red blood cell counts and white blood cell (immune system “killer cells”) damage, one’s normal cells can be forced by the damaged molecules and radiolytic compounds to adapt into an emergency mode of energy production.

Cells are forced from normal cellular oxidation of glucose into the anaerobic energy production of glucose fermentation. This is a cancerous condition. Anaerobic glucose fermentation is how cancer cells survive and thrive.

It almost seems impossible to omit microwaves completely in today’s fast-paced world. But reducing the use of microwave ovens will help, and that’s something you can feel good about.

Read the Full Article at RealFarmacy

Something Fresh Festival Moreland GA

somethingFresh

Something Fresh Fest is  brought to you by Organic Blood and Robert Pue.  It is a 3 day camping festival held on 200 private acres of land in Moreland, Ga, just an hour and a half south of the city of Atlanta.

 

This festival is a family event with a focus on healing, community, and connection with nature.

 

FESTIVAL FEATURES:

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: STICMAN OF RBG FIT CLUB/DEAD PRES, SUPA NOVA SLOM, & JUJUMAMA.

 

5K MOTIVATE YOURSELF RUN

 

HEALERS VILLAGE

 

SWEAT LODGE

 

INDEPENDENT FILM SCREENS

 

KIDS VILLAGE

 

VENDORS VILLAGE

 

WORKSHOPS 

For more information check out the website and purchase tickets  SomethingFreshFest

 

Afro Vegan Cook Book

Renowned chef and health activist, Bryant Terry shows us how we can do so by sharing some of his beautifully crafted Afro-Vegan recipes.

He presents delicious recipes that incorporate an assortment of wholesome and savory ingredients. CocoaSpiceCakeBryant adds a vegan twist to classics like Jamaican Patties, Spice Cake (pictured left) and grits as well as other dishes with unique and vibrant flavors such as Creamy Coconut-Cashew Soup with Okra, Corn and Tomatoes and Cinnamon-Soaked Wheat Berry Salad with dried apricots, carrots, and almonds all inspired by traditional cultural cuisine.

 

The book includes recipes for dishes like

Pan-Fried Grit Cakes with Crispy Leeks, Garlic and Thyme

Smothered Seitan Medallions in Mixed Mushroom Gravy

You can Order a copy of the book here at Barnes and Noble  or other online book stores  AfroVeganCover

Raw, Vegan, Vegetarian or Pescetarian?

A pescetarian is a person who does not eat any red meat, pork or poultry.  They consume fish or fish oils which are high on Omega-3 fatty acids.  They choose this lifestyle usually for two reasons: 1) the belief that consumption of fish is necessary for optimum life; and 2) as a stepping stone to a vegetarian diet.  The word is derived from the Latin word piscis.  Looks a lot like Pisces, huh???  And you know the symbol for Pisces, right?  In English, pesce means fish.  In Spanish, it’s spelled pesca.

The word “vegetarian” is derived from the Latin word “vegetus” meaning lively or vigorous.  A vegetarian is a person who does not eat any animals, but does eat eggs and dairy.  There are two categories of vegetarians.  Ovo vegetarians eat eggs, but no diary.  And lacto vegetarians eat diary but no eggs.  The eggs and dairy are maintained in the diet for the purpose of getting protein.  Good vegetarian protein sources are beans, peas, nuts, rice, dairy products, eggs, lentils, seeds, tofu and soya.  Vegetarians also do not eat anything that was derived from dead animals such as gelatin or rennet.  Gelatin is made by boiling the ligaments, tendons, skin and bones of pigs and cattle in water.  Rennet is an enzyme taken from the stomach of a slaughtered calf and is used to curdle milk to make cheese.
A vegan is one who eats nothing derived from an animal.  This means no eggs, no dairy and no honey.  Many concerns around a vegan diet is the lack of protein.  However, vegans get a great amount of usable protein from seeds such as flax, pumpkin and hemp.  Also, proteins can be found in a variety of vegetables such as kale, sprouts, spinach, broccoli, cucumber, celery and tomatoes.  And of course protein exists in nuts such as almonds and walnuts.

From an historical point of view, I want to share how the term vegan was derived.  In 1944, Donald Watson, a member of the Vegetarian Society in Leicester, England, set out to create an organization of vegetarians who did not eat any dairy.  The Society rejected them starting an alliance within so they ventured out.  They coined the term vegan (VEE-gan) from the first three letters of vegetarian and the last two letters.  Watson explained, “veganism starts with vegetarianism and carries it through to its logical conclusion.”

The other category that I mostly ascribe to is rawism, raw foodie or raw foodist.  In this diet, the foods consumed are uncooked and unprocessed.  The exact definition of raw food varies, but generally the food is considered raw if it has not been heated to more than 115 degrees Fahrenheit.  Although there is debate over what quantity of raw food intake actually defines one as a raw foodist, it is mostly agreed that one who consumes 75% or more of raw food fits.  In this diet, a rawist consumes food with the most energy because it is living.  Heating food above 116 degrees F is believed to destroy enzymes in food that can assist in the digestion and absorption of food. Cooking is also thought to diminish the nutritional value and “life force” of food.

I certainly hope this information has assisted you in understanding the differences between the alternate diet lifestyles.  Personally I am mostly a raw foodie, but in certain situations, I will go as far a pescetarian diet.  This generally occurs when I’m eating out and I’m not interested in a piece of lettuce and sliced tomato for my meal.  It’s absolutely amazing to me how so many restaurants resist expanding their options.  But oh well.

I encourage you to do research yourself on the foods you consume.  I guarantee that you will be shocked to learn how many of them are simply not good for your body.

TastyRawFood

The Ape, The Snake and the Lion

There are always hidden gems of knowledge inside of folktale . This is one of my favorite short stories. When I was younger this one taught me a very valuable lesson dealing in trust.

Long, long ago there lived, in a village called Keejee′jee, a woman whose husband died, leaving her with a little baby boy. She worked hard all day to get food for herself and child, but they lived very poorly and were most of the time half-starved.

When the boy, whose name was ’Mvoo′ Laa′na, began to get big, he said to his mother, one day: “Mother, we are always hungry. What work did my father do to support us?”

His mother replied: “Your father was a hunter. He set traps, and we ate what he caught in them.”

“Oho!” said ’Mvoo Laana; “that’s not work; that’s fun. I, too, will set traps, and see if we can’t get enough to eat.”

The next day he went into the forest and cut branches from the trees, and returned home in the evening.

The second day he spent making the branches into traps.

The third day he twisted cocoanut fiber into ropes.

The fourth day he set up as many traps as time would permit.

The fifth day he set up the remainder of the traps.

The sixth day he went to examine the traps, and they had caught so much game, beside what they needed for themselves, that he took a great quantity to the big town of Oongoo′ja, where he sold it and bought corn and other things, and the house was full of food; and, as this good fortune continued, he and his mother lived very comfortably.

But after a while, when he went to his traps he found nothing in them day after day.

 

One morning, however, he found that an ape had been caught in one of the traps, and he was about to kill it, when it said: “Son of Adam, I am Neea′nee, the ape; do not kill me. Take me out of this trap and let me go. Save me from the rain, that I may come and save you from the sun some day.”

So ’Mvoo Laana took him out of the trap and let him go.

When Neeanee had climbed up in a tree, he sat on a branch and said to the youth: “For your kindness I will give you a piece of advice: Believe me, men are all bad. Never do a good turn for a man; if you do, he will do you harm at the first opportunity.”

The second day, ’Mvoo Laana found a snake in the same trap. He started to the village to give the alarm, but the snake shouted: “Come back, son of Adam; don’t call the people from the village to come and kill me. I am Neeo′ka, the snake. Let me out of this trap, I pray you. Save me from the rain to-day, that I may be able to save you from the sun to-morrow, if you should be in need of help.”

So the youth let him go; and as he went he said, “I will return your kindness if I can, but do not trust any man; if you do him a kindness he will do you an injury in return at the first opportunity.”

The third day, ’Mvoo Laana found a lion in the same trap that had caught the ape and the snake, and he was afraid to go near it. But the lion said: “Don’t run away; I am Sim′ba Kong′way, the very old lion. Let me out of this trap, and I will not hurt you. Save me from the rain, that I may save you from the sun if you should need help.”

So ’Mvoo Laana believed him and let him out of the trap, and Simba Kongway, before going his way, said: “Son of Adam, you have been kind to me, and I will repay you with kindness if I can; but never do a kindness to a man, or he will pay you back with unkindness.”

The next day a man was caught in the same trap, and when the youth released him, he repeatedly assured him that he would never forget the service he had done him in restoring his liberty and saving his life.

Well, it seemed that he had caught all the game that could be taken in traps, and ’Mvoo Laana and his mother were hungry every day, with nothing to satisfy them, as they had been before. At last he said to his mother, one day: “Mother, make me seven cakes of the little meal we have left, and I will go hunting with my bow and arrows.” So she baked him the cakes, and he took them and his bow and arrows and went into the forest.

The youth walked and walked, but could see no game, and finally he found that he had lost his way, and had eaten all his cakes but one.

And he went on and on, not knowing whether he was going away from his home or toward it, until he came to the wildest and most desolate looking wood he had ever seen. He was so wretched and tired that he felt he must lie down and die, when suddenly he heard some one calling him, and looking up he saw Neeanee, the ape, who said, “Son of Adam, where are you going?”

“I don’t know,” replied ’Mvoo Laana, sadly; “I’m lost.”

“Well, well,” said the ape; “don’t worry. Just sit down here and rest yourself until I come back, and I will repay with kindness the kindness you once showed me.”

Then Neeanee went away off to some gardens and stole a whole lot of ripe paw-paws and bananas, and brought them to ’Mvoo Laana, and said: “Here’s plenty of food for you. Is there anything else you want? Would you like a drink?” And before the youth could answer he ran off with a calabash and brought it back full of water. So the youth ate heartily, and drank all the water he needed, and then each said to the other, “Good-bye, till we meet again,” and went their separate ways.

When ’Mvoo Laana had walked a great deal farther without finding which way he should go, he met Simba Kongway, who asked, “Where are you going, son of Adam?”

And the youth answered, as dolefully as before, “I don’t know; I’m lost.”

“Come, cheer up,” said the very old lion, “and rest yourself here a little. I want to repay with kindness to-day the kindness you showed me on a former day.”

So ’Mvoo Laana sat down. Simba Kongway went away, but soon returned with some game he had caught, and then he brought some fire, and the young man cooked the game and ate it. When he had finished he felt a great deal better, and they bade each other good-bye for the present, and each went his way.

After he had traveled another very long distance the youth came to a farm, and was met by a very, very old woman, who said to him: “Stranger, my husband has been taken very sick, and I am looking for some one to make him some medicine. Won’t you make it?” But he answered: “My good woman, I am not a doctor, I am a hunter, and never used medicine in my life. I can not help you.”

When he came to the road leading to the principal city he saw a well, with a bucket standing near it, and he said to himself: “That’s just what I want. I’ll take a drink of nice well-water. Let me see if the water can be reached.”

As he peeped over the edge of the well, to see if the water was high enough, what should he behold but a great big snake, which, directly it saw him, said, “Son of Adam, wait a moment.” Then it came out of the well and said: “How? Don’t you know me?”

“I certainly do not,” said the youth, stepping back a little.

“Well, well!” said the snake; “I could never forget you. I am Neeoka, whom you released from the trap. You know I said, ‘Save me from the rain, and I will save you from the sun.’ Now, you are a stranger in the town to which you are going; therefore hand me your little bag, and I will place in it the things that will be of use to you when you arrive there.”

 

So ’Mvoo Laana gave Neeoka the little bag, and he filled it with chains of gold and silver, and told him to use them freely for his own benefit. Then they parted very cordially.

When the youth reached the city, the first man he met was he whom he had released from the trap, who invited him to go home with him, which he did, and the man’s wife made him supper.

As soon as he could get away unobserved, the man went to the sultan and said: “There is a stranger come to my house with a bag full of chains of silver and gold, which he says he got from a snake that lives in a well. But although he pretends to be a man, I know that he is a snake who has power to look like a man.”

When the sultan heard this he sent some soldiers who brought ’Mvoo Laana and his little bag before him. When they opened the little bag, the man who was released from the trap persuaded the people that some evil would come out of it, and affect the children of the sultan and the children of the vizir.

Then the people became excited, and tied the hands of ’Mvoo Laana behind him.

But the great snake had come out of the well and arrived at the town just about this time, and he went and lay at the feet of the man who had said all those bad things about ’Mvoo Laana, and when the people saw this they said to that man: “How is this? There is the great snake that lives in the well, and he stays by you. Tell him to go away.”

But Neeoka would not stir. So they untied the young man’s hands, and tried in every way to make amends for having suspected him of being a wizard.

Then the sultan asked him, “Why should this man invite you to his home and then speak ill of you?”

And ’Mvoo Laana related all that had happened to him, and how the ape, the snake, and the lion had cautioned him about the results of doing any kindness for a man.

And the sultan said: “Although men are often ungrateful, they are not always so; only the bad ones. As for this fellow, he deserves to be put in a sack and drowned in the sea. He was treated kindly, and returned evil for good.”

Source: World of Tales 

LolliPop Kale Pesto Pasta

Recently, in food circles, there had been whispers of a vegetable called lollipop kale, supposedly a mythological-sounding cross between Russian red kale leaves and conventional Brussels sprouts. They cooked, and tasted, like both vegetables, and looked like they’d sprung from the mind of Dr. Seuss.

Ingredients 

1 cup kale sprouts (Lollipops)
1/2 cup fresh basil leaves
3 tablespoons minced garlic
1/2 cup olive oil
Water
Salt, to taste

Directions

1. Blanch basil and kale in boiling salted water. Shock in ice bath and squeeze out water.

2. In a blender, add kale, basil and garlic; then slowly stream in oil. Stream in a little bit of water to help emulsify, making sure not to add too much. Season with salt to taste. The pesto can keep in the refrigerator for up to a week.

To Assemble:

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 cup baby heirloom tomatoes
2 tablespoons small diced shallots
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 cup lollipop kale (or baby Tuscan kale if lollipop kale can’t be located)
2 cups cooked farfalle, cooked (farfalle is suggested, but any type of pasta can be used)
2 tablespoons toasted pine nuts
½ cup Lollipop Kale Pesto Sauce (recipe above)
4 tablespoons ricotta cheese
1-2 tablespoons ground Grana or Parmeggiano Reggiano

1. Heat olive oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add tomatoes and allow to blister.

2. Add shallots, garlic, and kale; sauté together for a minute.

3. Add in pasta and pine nuts. Pour sauce over the vegetables and pasta. Mix in ricotta cheese, flipping contents a few times. Divide pasta into two dishes and top with ground Grana or Parmeggiano Reggiano.

Enjoy this bright colorful dish! For more great recipes check out SaladSavoy