Tag Archives: mycology

Mushrooms x Bees = MycoHoney

Mushrooms Saving The Bees

Presenting at the recent Bioneers Annual Conference, Paul Stamets gave bombshell evidence that there is hope for bees, colony collapse, and our entire ecosystem. Washington State University recently completed a longevity stress test on bee populations that appears to confirm that the genes for the detoxification pathways in bees are turned on by beneficial fungi they collect from their environment. What’s more, it has been confirmed in previous testing that the red belted polypore mushroom degrades pesticides, herbicides and fungicides. It has also been confirmed in previous tests that fungicidal contamination reduces beneficial fungi in honey bee colonies. So what does this all mean? The widespread pesticide, herbicide and fungicide have created an absence of beneficial fungi in bee colonies. This turns off the proper detoxification pathways within the bees and their colonies leading to a hyper-accumulation of toxins. Colony collapses typically follows shortly thereafter.

What appears to hold a key to slowing down or even stopping the current epidemic of bee colony collapse is a solution called “Mycohoney,” made from the polypore mushroom mycelium. When fed to bees in the University of Washington trials, it showed extraordinary significance in life extension of the honey bees. Walter S. Sheppard, PhD P.F. Thurber Professor, Chair, Department of Entomology Washington State University gave this comment:

As an entomologist with 39 years’ experience studying bees, I am unaware of any reports of materials that extend the life of worker bees more than this.”

Read more about Mycology and the way it helps save the world at AetherForce.com 

25 Amazing Mushroom Photos

25 STUNNING PHOTOS WITHIN THE MYSTICAL WORLD OF MUSHROOMS

 Puff Balls

Puffballs
A puffball is a member of any of several groups of fungi in the division Basidiomycota. The puffballs were previously treated as a taxonomic group called the Gasteromycetes or Gasteromycetidae, but they are now known to be a polyphyletic assemblage. The distinguishing feature of all puffballs is that they do not have an open cap with spore-bearing gills. Instead, spores are produced internally, in a spheroidal fruiting body called a gasterothecium (gasteroid (‘stomach-like’) basidiocarp). As the spores mature, they form a mass called a gleba in the centre of the fruiting body that is often of a distinctive color and texture. The basidiocarp remains closed until after the spores have been released from the basidia. Eventually, it develops an aperture, or dries, becomes brittle, and splits, and the spores escape

MARASMIUS HAEMATOCEPHALUS

Marasmius Haematocephalus
Marasmius is a genus of mushrooms, in the family Marasmiaceae. It contains about 500 species of agarics,[1] of which a few, such as Marasmius oreades, are edible. However, most members of this genus are small, unimpressive brown mushrooms. Their humble appearance contributes to their not being readily distinguishable to non-specialists, and they are therefore seldom collected by mushroom hunters. Several of the species are known to grow in the characteristic fairy ring pattern.

MYCENA CHLOROPHOS

Mycena Chlorophos
Mycena chlorophos is a species of agaric fungus in the family Mycenaceae. First described in 1860, the fungus is found in subtropical Asia, including Japan, Taiwan, Polynesia, Java, and Sri Lanka, in Australia, and Brazil. Fruit bodies (mushrooms) have pale brownish-grey sticky caps up to 30 mm (1.2 in) in diameter atop stems 6–30 mm (0.2–1.2 in) long and up to a millimeter thick. The mushrooms are bioluminescent and emit a pale green light. Fruiting occurs in forests on fallen woody debris such as dead twigs, branches, and logs. The fungus can be made to grow and fruit in laboratory conditions, and the growth conditions affecting bioluminescence have been investigated.

RHODOTUS PALMATUS

Rhodotus Palmatus
Rhodotus is a genus in the Physalacriaceae family of fungi. It is a monotypic genus and consists of the single mushroom species Rhodotus palmatus, known in the vernacular as the netted Rhodotus, the rosy veincap, or the wrinkled peach. This uncommon species has a circumboreal distribution, and has been collected in eastern North America, northern Africa, Europe, and Asia; declining populations in Europe have led to its appearance in over half of the European fungal Red Lists of threatened species. Typically found growing on the stumps and logs of rotting hardwoods, mature specimens may usually be identified by the pinkish color and the distinctive ridged and veined surface of their rubbery caps; variations in the color and quantity of light received during development lead to variations in the size, shape, and cap color of fruit bodies.

AMETHYST DECEIVER

Amethyst Deceiver
Laccaria amethystina, commonly known as the Amethyst Deceiver is a small brightly colored, edible mushroom, that grows in deciduous as well as coniferous forests. Because its bright amethyst coloration fades with age and weathering, it becomes difficult to identify, hence the common name ‘Deceiver’. This common name is shared with its close relation Laccaria laccata that also fades and weathers. It is found mainly in Northern temperate zones, though it is reported to occur in tropical Central and South America as well. Recently, some of the other species in the genus have been given the common name of “deceiver”.

 

Read The Full List Plus More at OpenMind

The Liberation Pack

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Mycology – The scientific study of fungi. The first time I went looking for mushrooms with my boy Jordan (RIP) was quite magical. Blue Wylies were the type he would forage north Georgia. We pulled up to a spot behind a playground with a small area filled with trees that separated the park from the horse stable. He warned me to be in and out cause this spot was hot but he also brought a spliff to burn while we was there. Jordan had that type of logic. 5 minutes of looking around we saw nothing he told me to spark the spliff , I lit it and 5 seconds later it seemed like mushrooms all of sudden started appearing. We left with 2 grocery bags filled of fresh dark blue Wiley mushrooms. I was 16 at the time and thought we could always find them wild but that wasn’t the case. This forced me to learn how to grow mushrooms myself and I still wish I had a sample of blue wileys to clone. I’ll always appreciate him for putting me on. This is the Liberation Pack from @myco_dogon_west 3 Agar Plates 1 Genetics Plate 1 Spore print 1 Art piece / Giveaway Entry If your interested in growing and studying this is a good place to begin. Plus it’s an affordable hobby/ field of learning. #mycology #cubensis #growmushrooms #mushrooms #psilocybinmushrooms #psilocybe

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