Tag Archives: ocean

Rare Diamond Reveals Earth’s Interior is All Wet

“It’s actually the confirmation that there is a very, very large amount of water that’s trapped in a really distinct layer in the deep Earth,” said Graham Pearson, lead study author and a geochemist at the University of Alberta in Canada. The findings were published today (March 12) in the journal Nature.dd

The worthless-looking diamond encloses a tiny piece of an olivine mineral called ringwoodite, and it’s the first time the mineral has been found on Earth’s surface in anything other than meteorites or laboratories. Ringwoodite only forms under extreme pressure, such as the crushing load about 320 miles (515 kilometers) deep in the mantle.

What’s in the mantle?

Most of Earth’s volume is mantle, the hot rock layer between the crust and the core. Too deep to drill, the mantle’s composition is a mystery leavened by two clues: meteorites, and hunks of rock heaved up by volcanoes.dd2 First, scientists think the composition of the Earth’s mantle is similar to that of meteorites called chondrites, which are chiefly made of olivine. Second, lava belched by volcanoes sometimes taps the mantle, bringing up chunks of odd minerals that hint at the intense heat and pressure olivine endures in the bowels of the Earth.

Earth’s deepest ocean

The diamond from Brazil confirms that the models are correct: Olivine is ringwoodite at this depth, a layer called the mantle transition zone. And it resolves a long-running debate about water in the mantletransition zone. The ringwoodite is 1.5 percent water, present not as a liquid but as hydroxide ions (oxygen and hydrogen molecules bound together). The results suggest there could be a vast store of water in the mantle transition zone, which stretches from 254 to 410 miles (410 to 660 km) deep.

“It translates into a very, very large mass of water, approaching the sort of mass of water that’s present in all the world’s ocean,” Pearson told Live Science’s Our Amazing Planet.

Full Article Here

 

 

Swim with the Jellyfish

Ten million jellyfish swim from one side of the lake to the other as they follow the sun in the popular snorkeling destination called Jellyfish Lake.

A unique migration occurs every day in a saltwater lake on Eil Malk Island, a part of the uninhabited Rock Islands of Palau in the Western Pacific Ocean, and diver Nadia Aly found herself smack-dab in the middle of it. CATERS_JELLYFISH_LAKE_10-1024x682Jellyfish Lake is a landlocked saltwater lake that was formed 12,000 years ago. It is connected to the ocean through fissures and tunnels in the limestone of an ancient reef. As the jellyfish evolved in the algae-rich lake, they lost their sting, allowing for snorkelers to swim through clouds of moon and golden jellyfish without the fear of getting stung.

According to PBS, the jellyfish have eight primitive eyes and algae that live within their cells and migrate twice a day to get sunlight to their internal algae so that the algae can grow.CATERS_JELLYFISH_LAKE_04-1024x682                                                 At night they swim to a lower depth, return to the over side of the lake, and start over the next day. Aly spent a total of eight hours in the waters of Jellyfish Lake, capturing several stunning photographs, including a selfie.

“I shot thousands of photos over the few days I was there,” she told MailOnline. “The time of day and location of the sun are the two factors that really make or break the shoot.”CATERS_JELLYFISH_LAKE_02-1024x682                                         Jellyfish Lake is popular with snorkelers since the jellyfish have lost their sting over time with absence of many predators

See more amazing photos of the Jellyfish Here 

 

Sea of Discovery , Ocean of Possibility

To date, we have explored less than five percent of the ocean

The ocean is the lifeblood of Earth, covering more than 70 percent of the planet’s surface, driving weather, regulating temperature, and ultimately supporting all living organisms. Throughout history, the ocean has been a vital source of sustenance, transport, commerce, growth, and inspiration.

Yet for all of our reliance on the ocean, 95 percent of this realm remains unexplored, unseen by human eyes.

Source

How does the moon really effect us?

All objects including stars, planets and satellite bodies along with their gross (tangible) attributes emanate subtle (intangible) frequencies. These physical attributes and subtle-frequencies affect us in varying degrees at a physical and subtle-level.-moon-a

The frequencies emanating from the Moon affect the frequencies of the mental body, i.e. mind of human beings. By ‘mind’ we mean our feelings, emotions and desires. The mind consists of the conscious mind and the sub-conscious mind. Within the sub-conscious mind we have a number of impressions that are embedded that decide our basic nature and personality. We are however not aware of the thoughts or impressions in our sub-conscious mind. These impressions get collected over a number of lifetimes.

These impressions in our mind are the catalysts for all our thoughts and subsequent actions. Both the impressions and our thoughts have their own subtle-frequencies.

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The moon frequencies have the capacity to make the thought frequencies from the impressions in our sub-conscious mind to surface to the conscious mind. Once in the conscious mind we become aware of them. Thus one will be influenced as per the predominant impressions in one’s mind. We have explained this in more detail in the next section.

Similarly the moon also affects the mind of animals. However as the sub-conscious mind of animals consists of impressions related only to basic desires such as hunger, sex, sleep etc., the heightened thoughts are related to these basic instincts only.

Read The Full Articles: Sources Sciences360,  Spiritual Research Foundation

Knowledge is power, Be strong!

Moeraki Boulders

The Moeraki Boulders are unusually large and spherical boulders lying along a stretch of Koekohe Beach on the wave-cut Otago coast of New Zealand between Moeraki and Hampden. Moeraki Boulders New Zealand 08They occur scattered either as isolated or clusters of boulders within a stretch of beach where they have been protected in a scientific reserve. The erosion by wave action ofmudstone, comprising local bedrock and landslides, frequently exposes embedded isolated boulders. These boulders are grey-colored septarian concretions, which have been exhumed from the mudstone enclosing them and concentrated on the beach by coastal erosion.[1][2][3][4]

Source –Wikipedia