Tag Archives: oil

How is Plastic Made?

Plastics are made from oil. Oil is a carbon-rich raw material, and plastics are large carbon-containing compounds. They’re large molecules called polymers, which are composed of repeating units of shorter carbon-containing compounds called monomers. Chemists combine various types of monomers in many different arrangements to make an almost infinite variety of plastics with different chemical properties. Most plastic is chemically inert and will not react chemically with other substances — you can store alcohol, soap, water, acid or gasoline in a plastic container without dissolving the container itself. Plastic can be molded into an almost infinite variety of shapes, so you can find it in toys, cups, bottles, utensils, wiring, cars, even in bubble gum. Plastics have revolutionized the world.

Because plastic doesn’t react chemically with most other substances, it doesn’t decay. Therefore, plastic disposal poses a difficult and significant environmental problem. Plastic hangs around in the environment for centuries, so recycling is the best method of disposal. However, new technologies are being developed to make plastic from biological substances like corn oil. These types of plastics would be biodegradable and better for the environment.

Book Select: Face to Face

“Professor A. Ramachandran has contributed significantly to the Indian art scene. He has been a ceaseless experimenter and a versatile artist. Over the years his paintings have acquired a classical monumentality and his use of medium and colours luminosity. He has also created a substantial body of sculptures. This book of three essays and a photo-essay is being published on the occasion of his solo exhibition in New York in December 2007, featuring faces from Rajasthan, studies of heads in oil and a suite of ten watercolours.f2f The book crystallizes the artist’s philosophy of life and his persona and his relationship with his subjects and himself while distilling his philosophy of the surge of life force in all things in the universe. It highlights his observations about his aesthetics and the evolution of his distinctive visual style, as well as the influences of Kerala and Santiniketan in moulding his artistic sensibilities. His engagement with modernism does not confine itself to expressing himself through an international idiom, but reinventing a traditional idiom to suit a contemporary sensibility. Besides his paintings, he has also created a substantial body of sculptures.” – The Guild