Images

Kangaroo Image Wins Photographer Nature Award

Praise to the rain, by Charles H Davis. The other roos had seen this many times and merely sat drenched and depressed waiting for the storm to pass. The young bucks on the other hand had something to prove, rearing back onto only their tails they reached as high as they could, trying to intimidate each other into submission.

Source – HeraldSun 

Hidden Computational Power Found in the Arms of Neurons

The dendritic arms of some human neurons can perform logic operations that once seemed to require whole neural networks.

Thin dendrites resembling a plant’s roots radiate in all directions from the cell body of this cortical neuron. Individual dendrites may process the signals they receive from adjacent neurons before passing them along as inputs to the cell’s overall response.

he information-processing capabilities of the brain are often reported to reside in the trillions of connections that wire its neurons together. But over the past few decades, mounting research has quietly shifted some of the attention to individual neurons, which seem to shoulder much more computational responsibility than once seemed imaginable.

The latest in a long line of evidence comes from scientists’ discovery of a new type of electrical signal in the upper layers of the human cortex. Laboratory and modeling studies have already shown that tiny compartments in the dendritic arms of cortical neurons can each perform complicated operations in mathematical logic. But now it seems that individual dendritic compartments can also perform a particular computation — “exclusive OR” — that mathematical theorists had previously categorized as unsolvable by single-neuron systems.

“I believe that we’re just scratching the surface of what these neurons are really doing,” said Albert Gidon, a postdoctoral fellow at Humboldt University of Berlin and the first author of the paper that presented these findings in Science earlier this month.

The discovery marks a growing need for studies of the nervous system to consider the implications of individual neurons as extensive information processors. “Brains may be far more complicated than we think,” said Konrad Kording, a computational neuroscientist at the University of Pennsylvania, who did not participate in the recent work. It may also prompt some computer scientists to reappraise strategies for artificial neural networks, which have traditionally been built based on a view of neurons as simple, unintelligent switches.

ead the full article at QuantaMagazine 

Goddess Space w. ReignGlobal

In my journey from Pittsburgh to Atlanta I planned to make a quick stop to decide the direction I would be heading in. The date of that decision landed on 1.11. Washington DC was the mid point. From a random scroll on the gram I saw that Sha (ReignGlobal) was having an event Goddess Space Root Chakra themed. There was a video posted on Instagram of a previous Goddess Space. I noticed it was recorded from a iPhone because of the flickering due to lighting. I thought to myself why not put on some red threads swing by to soak in some of the laughter of Angela aka Goddess Body, Twist some of the finest DC greenery, plus drink a little wine, all while recording the proper video an event like this deserves. The last event I shot was in Atlanta a few weeks ago. A few weeks my camera has been sitting in the corner collecting dust, staring at me lifelessly. These days I’ve found more pleasure In contemplating what story I will be reliving to record orally or writing out from day to day. Practice perfectly is a saying I like to keep In pocket for moments like this. Even when I haven’t completed a creative activity for a while I trust all the practice will return to me perfectly, I’ve had plenty of practice over the years. I began hitting buttons and flipping switches on the memory capturing device I had forgotten about. All the familiar highs of being surrounded in a golden sun lit room full of beautiful women wearing a vibrant hue of red came rushing back like dope to an addict that relapsed. I begin tuning into the music, dance and vibe my way around the room while visually determining who wants to be filmed and who runs away from the camera if I even look in their direction. The anchor, there’s usually one lady amongst all that my eyes will focus on more than any other. This helps me contrast what I’m looking for against who or what I would like to look at. There’s a balance to maintain between playful attention and a disciplined wandering going on in my mind. This gives space for ideas and thoughts that bring a smile to myself and anyone just as observant noticing me in my own world. A taste of spicy lentils on my tongue began a reflection of the Ethiopian dish I grabbed from around the corner before I began. The chef took just long enough for me to roll a rushed spliff inside the bathroom to blaze a on the walk back to the venue bumping Nas God’s Son to set the mood. In my zone, camera swinging I take in all the laughs along with subtleties of women expressing themselves together growing more comfortable by the minute. From the Cacao ceremony to the space women held for each other it still feels good to have the responsibility of remembering this feeling. Now when will you see an edit of the video? who knows. When will it be requested, paid for, then released? who knows. Until then you can hold on to these candids below. I’m looking forward to seeing what Kwam has in stored, he even managed to grab some shots of me! Check his page out for the photography side of this event. Kwam is real cool down to earth brother, rocking a chain with a copper wrapped pointed quartz crystal the size of my forearm I know he brought back from Wakanda. Shout out to Emmy, writer, story teller creator. It’s always funny when I encounter someone that follows me already and even more funny when I’m already following them but we still can’t recognize each other in person without loading up the gram. Emmy and I shared a mutual moment of genuine excitement that starts on a phone but comes full circle in person with a hug.

Emmy

Origins of India

“…The darkest man is here the most highly esteemed and considered better than the others who are not so dark. Let me add that in very truth these people portray and depict their gods and their idols black and their devils white as snow. For they say that God and all the saints are black and the devils are all white. That is why they portray them as I have described.” – Marco Polo,after visiting the Pandyan Kingdom in 1288

More than a thousand years before the foundations of Greece and Rome, proud and industrious Black men and women known as the Dravidian erected a powerful civilization in the Indus Valley. From those origins, African Kings in India drove the region’s commerce, culture, and belief systems.

4 African Kings Who Ruled India That Have Been Erased From History

Dr. Clyde Winters, author of Afrocentrism: Myth or Science? writes:

“Ethiopians have had very intimate relations with Indians. In fact, in antiquity the Ethiopians ruled much of India. These Ethiopians were called the Naga. It was the Naga who created Sanskrit. A reading of ancient Dravidian literature which dates back to 500 BC, gives us considerable information on the Naga. In Indian tradition the Naga won central India from the Villavar (bowmen) and Minavar (fishermen).”

He goes on to say “The Naga were great seamen who ruled much of India, Sri Lanka and Burma. To the Aryans they described as half man and snake. The Tamil knew them as warlike people who used the bow and noose. The earliest mention of the Naga, appear in the Ramayana , they are also mentioned in the Mahabharata. In the Mahabharata we discover that the Naga had the capital city in the Dekkan, and other cities spread between the Jumna and Ganges as early as 1300 BC. The Dravidian classic, the Chilappathikaram made it clear that the first great kingdom of India was Naganadu. 

The Naga probably came from Kush-Punt/Ethiopia since the Puntites were the greatest sailors of the ancient world, and in the Kemetic inscriptions there is mention of the Puntite ports of Outculit, Hamesu and Tekaru, which corresponds to Adulis, Hamasen and Tigre.”

Even the legends of India revere the Black race that laid the foundation of their civilization, and the holiest books of India also affirm that enlightenment came from Ethiopia ((The first God of India was a dreadlocked black man called Shiva.)

Read the full article at Panalliance

Transformations of Self Love

Who do we really know? Is it surface deep? Are we quicker to enter and be entered physically than to allow that same entrance to be walked through mentally in the form of questions. Answers that can reveal truths of yourself that don’t want to be seen quite yet. How does one confront part of themselves that even they don’t comprehend? Not knowing why you are who you are can be nerve racking but aren’t we changing everyday? Its rare I wake up the same person I fell asleep as. Its all observation of self. Watching, listening and learning can be transformative. We attract who can relate to our pain unknowingly.  We communicate hand in hand with one foot in front of the next searching to find if we have more in common than curious eyes.

 

 

Australia Arrests Dozens for Starting Bushfires on Purpose

Nearly 200 people have allegedly committed bushfire-related offenses

 

KRISTIN HOUSER  

On Monday, the New South Wales police force announced that it had charged 24 people with deliberately starting bushfires in the Australian state.

The force also noted that it’s taken legal action against a total of 183 people for 205 bushfire-related offenses, including failure to comply with a fire ban and discarding lit cigarettes or matches on land.

The news that arsonists have contributed to the deadly fires raging in Australia is both highly disturbing and disheartening. But perhaps even more troubling is the wielding of this information as “evidence” that climate change isn’t a major contributing factor to the emergency.

Timothy Graham, a senior lecturer on social network analysis at the Queensland University of Technology, told ZDNet that he believes someone has orchestrated a disinformation campaign on social media to try to shift the blame for Australia’s bushfires away from climate change and onto the arsonists.

“I’m not sure whether it’s orchestrated, or the extent to which this campaign is being coordinated,” he told the publication, “but there does appear to be a particular focal point for spreading disinformation about arson in relation to the bushfires.”

That was his conclusion after analyzing 1,340 tweets containing the hashtag #arsonemergency, all of which were published by a total of 315 accounts between January 1 and January 6.

After running his sample of tweets through an online tool designed to detect whether a Twitter account belongs to an actual human or a bot, he found the proportion of suspected bots was much higher than expected, leaving him “confident” in the existence of some soft of deliberate disinformation campaign.

“The conspiracy theories going around (including arson as the main cause of the fires) reflect an increased distrust in scientific expertise, scepticism of the media, and rejection of liberal democratic authority,” Graham told The Guardian.

“These are all major factors in the global fight against disinformation,” he continued, “and based on my preliminary analysis, it appears that Australia has for better or worse entered that battlefield, at least for now.”

READ MORE: Bots and trolls spread false arson claims in Australian fires ‘disinformation campaign’ [The Guardian]

More on the bushfires: The Australian Wildfires Are so Bad You Can See Them From Space

Psilocybin-Infused Coffee Coming to Denver

Sträva Craft Coffee in Denver has developed a plan to help coffee level up. It’s not a CBD infusion (they already offer that), or grass-fed butter, or MCT oil… it’s psilocybin-infused coffee.

On the heels of Denver’s recent move to decriminalize the personal possession and use of psilocybin mushrooms, Sträva Craft Coffee is preparing to take a step toward normalizing safe, regular, sub-perceptual psychedelic use.

According to the company’s press release, “by incorporating microdoses of psilocybin into coffee and tea, Sträva aims to empower consumers with access to natural compounds which may offer life changing benefits.”

This move fits neatly into Sträva’s ethos which centers around responsible, sustainable cultivation, and the delivery of innovative, infused coffee.

Sträva CEO Andrew Aamos also sees this as an opportunity to open a conversation. As with the new psilocybin dispensary in Vancouver, Aamos views this decision to offer psilocybin infused coffee as one that promotes wellness and principle.

“Just as cannabis has been misunderstood and controversial for decades,” he stated in the press release, “psilocybin from mushrooms has been equally polarizing, yet proponents of both suggest they each can contribute meaningfully to the human experience. As the research is showing, with measured consumption, cannabis and psilocybin can both promote physiological, mental, and spiritual health.”

This is what it’s all about for Aamos and the Sträva team — opening the conversation, and providing high quality, beneficial products for regular consumption.

“Some of these botanicals Hemp, CBD, and now psilocybin] belong in these daily habits,” Aamos says. “They present an opportunity for a beverage that is approachable and familiar and allows us to deliver more value to the consumer, to help them live a better day.”

The most recent microdosing research is illustrating this potential.

A recent study organized by the Dutch Psychedelic Society linked microdoses of psilocybin to increased creative problem solving.  Researchers found that after a single microdose of psilocybin, both convergent thinking (standard problem solving) and divergent thinking (complex problem solving) improved in the majority of participants.

Not only does this research suggest that microdosing psilocybin is effective, it suggests that one microdose can have an immediate, positive impact on how we process and organize information. (Talk about a morning boost!)

As far as the logistics of selling psilocybin-infused coffee and other psychedelic beverages is concerned, there are still some regulatory matters to sort out — decriminalization is not legalization — but Aamos is hopeful that by late 2020 or early 2021, Sträva will be offering coffee and tea with a psilocybin microdose.

“I see my role and the role of Sträva,” Aamos says, “as incorporating psilocybin into a conversation that makes it easier for people to relate to. We want the conversations around psilocybin to mirror those around marijuana — what are the benefits?”

By opening up these avenues for discussion (and access), Sträva Craft Coffee will begin to help people answer a crucial question that lies at the heart of all of this: is microdosing psilocybin right for me?

Source – TheThirdWave 

Book Select – The Sexual Teachings of the White Tigress & Jade Dragon : Secrets of the Female/Male Taoist Masters

 White Tigress women undertake disciplined sexual and spiritual practices to maintain their beauty and youthfulness, realize their full feminine potential, and achieve immortality. Revealed here for the first time in English are the secrets of the White Tigress that have all but disappeared from the world. Under the guidance of Madame Lin, the matriarch of a distinguished White Tigress lineage still in existence in Taiwan, Hsi Lai was given the privilege to study these practices and record them from a modern perspective so they will be forever preserved. The vast majority of Taoist texts on alchemy, meditation, and sexuality are directed at male practitioners. The Sexual Teachings of the White Tigresspresents traditions that focus on women, traditions that stem from a long line of courtesans and female Taoists. Translations of the ancient teachings from a rare White Tigress manual dating back 3,000 years explain the sexual and spiritual refinement of ching(sexual energy), chi (vital energy), and shen(consciousness)–the Three Treasures of Taoism–the secret to unlocking eternal youthfulness and immortality

Reveals how the sexual practices of the Taoist Jade Dragon can help men achieve “immortality” through the enhancement of their sexual prowess.

• A companion guide to The Sexual Teachings of the White Tigress that focuses on the male side of White Tigress sexual practices.

• Reveals the nine Jade Dragon exercises and other Taoist techniques for achieving the elixir of immortality.

• Offers physical and spiritual solutions for the sexual issues facing men.

Hsi Lai continues the work he began in The Sexual Teachings of the White Tigress by exploring more fully the male role in Taoist sexual transformation. As with those of the White Tigress, the techniques of the Jade Dragon are part of a disciplined sexual and spiritual practice. The goal for the Jade Dragon is health, longevity, and immortality through external and internal regimens for the enhancement and accumulation of the Three Treasures of Taoism–ching (sexual and physical energy), qi (breath and vital energy) and shen (spiritual and mental energy).

The author presents the nine Jade Dragon exercises that strengthen erections, enlarge the penis, increase semen quantity and quality, prevent premature ejaculations, and enhance sexual energy. He also details herbal remedies for revitalization that address both physical and spiritual sexual components, as well as ancient Taoist breathing and meditative practices and sexual stimulation techniques that amplify sexual intensity in order to create the elixir of immortality. Concluding with the importance of the interactions between and interdependence of White Tigresses and Jade Dragons, Hsi Lai shows the reader how these ancient Taoist secrets can be incorporated into a contemporary lifestyle.

28 Black Picture Books Not About Boycotts, Basketball or Buses

When I made the first of these lists back in 2016 I had no idea the places it would go: Libraries, schools and families all over the world continue to share it even now, and I am humbled by its reception. I’ve long threatened to do a sequel to that list, so here it is. Same old librarian, all new tricks. Same rules apply:

1) Titles that came out within the last ten years (or so).
2) A spread in the gender of the protagonists.
3) Shine light on typically ignored aspects of black life. Nothing against history, but we aren’t exactly hurting for books on slavery. We could do with some more books about fishing, owning pets, and generally any other hobby children have. (That said, this list caught a lot more history than the last one.)

The books are not ranked in any way. Creator(s) are noted: Author/Illustrator.
See you in the stacks, but more importantly, buy some books!

 

  1. Freedom in Congo Square
    (Carole Boston Weatherford/R. Gregory Christie)
    I lean out of historical stuff for these lists, but this book was too strong to ignore. A look at the birthplace of jazz, and how Congo Square was just about the only place that could have happened.

freedomcongo

 

  1. Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut
    (Derrick Barnes/Gordon C. James)
    Anything that alleviates the drama of taking a child to the barbershop should be celebrated. A beautifully done and warm book about learning to love your hair, the process of maintaining it, and the unique experience of barbershop traditions.

Crown

 

  1. Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat
    (Javaka Steptoe)
    This is the 2017 Coretta Scott King Book Awards Illustrator Winner, and for good reason. Get hip to one of the greatest names to ever grace the art world in this completely accessible narrative done in a playful and informative style.
    radiantchild
  2. Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race
    (Margot Lee Shetterly/Laura Freeman)
    By now you’ve probably seen the movie and read Shetterly’s original adult version of this story. This is a fine encapsulation of the women scientists who went unheralded for years, now specifically for younger children.
    hiddenfigures

 

  1. Big Hair, Don’t Care
    (Crystal Swain-Bates)
    Nobody loves their hair more than the irrepressible narrator of this book. Perfect for any child that may struggle with self-esteem because of their crown.
    bighair

 

  1. My Friend Maya Loves to Dance
    (Cheryl Willis Hudson/Eric Velasquez)
    A strong and beautifully rendered take on an otherwise common childrens book topic. And how about that co-ed dance class, eh?
    myfriendmaya

 

  1. I’m a Pretty Little Black Girl!
    (Betty K. Bynum/Claire Armstrong Parod)
    This book takes the ugliness of colorism and turns it completely on its head, celebrating all the shades black girls come in.
    imaprettylittleblackgirl

 

  1. Mae Among the Stars
    (Roda Ahmed/Stasia Burrington)
    A warm and engaging take on the childhood dreams and observations that made Mae Jemison – the first African American woman to travel into space – put on a helmet.
    maeamongstars

 

  1. Hey Black Child
    (Useni Eugene Perkins/Bryan Collier)
    A poem-as-book self-esteem building exercise best done out loud. Emphasis on the loud.
    heyblackchild

 

  1. Knock Knock: My Dad’s Dream for Me
    (Daniel Beaty /Bryan Collier)
    I’m a sucker for a book with a present and affectionate black father in it, and while this one roped me in with that promise, it takes matters further by actually being about what it’s like when your father isn’t present.
    knockknock

 

  1. Ruth and the Green Book
    (Calvin Alexander Ramsey, Gwen Strauss/Floyd Cooper)
    The infamous Green Books and the circumstances that made them necessary during segregation are conveyed here in a careful and intelligent way.
    ruthgreenbook

 

  1. The Ring Bearer
    (Floyd Cooper)
    Lots of stories out there about flower girls. Almost none about ring bearers.
    ringbearer

 

  1. Early Sunday Morning
    (Denene Millner/Vanessa Brantley-Newton)
    Denene Millner has parlayed her best-selling success in writing non-fiction into a full-blown imprint deal that lets her publish children’s books with a focus on black creators, so if you see a book with “Denene Millner Books” across the top (see #2 above), get it. Early Sunday Morning is a delight of a book, roping in several black traditions in a beautiful package.
    earlysundaymorning

 

  1. Tea Cakes for Tosh
    (Kelly Starling Lyons/E. B. Lewis)
    I am also a sucker for grandmothers. This is a political treat of a book that touches on family, slavery, and the importance of traditions.
    teacakestosh

 

  1. Around Our Way on Neighbors’ Day
    (Tameka Fryer Brown/Charlotte Riley-Webb)
    This book brims with examples of a diverse and well-rounded neighborhood life with irrepressible art to boot.
    aroundourway

 

  1. This Is the Rope
    (Jacqueline Woodson/James Ransome)
    The prolific Woodson has been killing the book game for a while now, and this picture book offering takes a common playful activity – jumping rope – and connects it to notions of legacy and history without being heavy-handed.
    thisistherope

 

  1. I’m a Big Brother Now
    (Katura J. Hudson/Sylvia L. Walker)
    A good one for that soon-to-be-a-sibling who wants to know what life after the new baby is going to look like, and what their job is.
    imabigborthernow

 

  1. Lily Brown’s Paintings
    (Angela Johnson/E. B. Lewis)
    Every child loves to paint, but few of them are as talented as budding art forger Lily Brown, who tries her hand at capturing the styles of the masters.
    lilybrown

 

  1. Little Melba and Her Big Trombone
    (Katheryn Russell-Brown/Frank Morrison)
    A beautifully illustrated and sound-rich biography of important (yet unheralded) trombone player Melba Liston.
    (Note: On my first list there was a book about current musical herald Trombone Shorty, so it was good to find a book that essentially says “These things come from traditions. Yes, even the trombone players.”)
    littlemelba

 

  1. Fishing Day
    (Andrea Davis Pinkney/Shane W. Evans)
    A girl and her mother go fishing is just about the surprising premise I found this time around. Alas, of course, Jim Crow appears. A reach-across-the-aisle tale.
    fishing day

 

  1. Young Cornrows Callin Out the Moon
    (Ruth Forman/Cbabi Bayoc)
    An ode to Philly brownstone summertime life, this is a vibrant and slightly dialect inflected book-length poem. “Today Was a Good Day” for kids.
    young_cornrows_calling_out_the_moon

 

  1. The Hat That Wore Clara B.
    (Melanie Turner-Denstaedt/Frank Morrison)
    A black woman’s church hat is a sacred thing. They come with their own stories and rituals, and this book does a great job of relaying the layers of tradition associated with them. Black church childrens books are practically a genre unto themselves, and this title is a standard bearer.
    hatthatworeclaraB

 

  1. Not Norman: A Goldfish Story
    (Kelly Bennett/Noah Z. Jones)
    Most kids want pets, but this kid is not feeling Norman the Goldfish. Fish don’t do anything cool…or do they? A cute study in appreciation, responsibility that has a nice wry touch that makes reading it aloud a lot of fun.
    notnorman

 

  1. The Moon Over Star
    (Dianna Hutts Aston/Jerry Pinkney)
    Any story that has a young girl make her cousins build her a spaceship in the backyard is pretty much gold. A period piece (1969) with a wink at Mae Jemison (see #8), suggesting that there just might be enough books about black women and space to make a proper school unit.
    moonoverstar

 

  1. The Quickest Kid in Clarksville
    (Pat Zietlow Miller/Frank Morrison)
    Two girls face off in a dramatic foot race before the big parade comes featuring Olympic gold medalist Wilma Rudolph. There’s way more drama than I gave a book about a foot race. Like, I got invested.
    quickest-kid-in-clarksville

 

  1. Hank’s Big Day
    (Evan Kuhlman/Chuck Groenink)
    I was confused by this book because the first half of it focused entirely on the adventures of Hank the Pill Bug. I feared the black girl on the cover was mere decoration, only to discover halfway through the book that Hank has essentially been making his way to Amelia, who as it turns out is his best friend. A wonderful testimony about friendship featuring an engaging young girl and her buddy the pill bug.
    hanksBigDay

 

  1. Grace for President
    (Kelly DiPucchio/LeUyen Pham)
    What better time to instill the message in our youth that their civic duty moving forward should largely be to make us forget 2017 ever happened.
    gracepresident

 

  1. Marvelous Cornelius: Hurricane Katrina and the Spirit of New Orleans
    (Phil Bildner/John Parra)
    Another New Orleans-focused entry with a ton of heart. Based on the life of French Quarter sanitation worker Cornelius Washington, who was a real character. It is a great slice of community life of the most unique city in America after one of its most trying times. Don’t worry: The hurricane part is brief. It’s mostly neighborhood love. Also, any opportunity to get a room full of kids to yell “Hootie Hoo!” unapologetically simply must be taken advantage of.
    marvelouscorn

How the Soil Became Our Soul

How the Soil Became Our Soul: Fasting, Spirituality, and the Ancestors

Many of us think of the word “ancestors” as referring to ancient human-like beings, but if we go further back into time, we can see that our ancestors WERE ACTUALLY microscopic entities. And since our digestive system consists of trillions of microbes, we actually carry around most of our bodily “ancestors”…in our guts. Isn’t that convenient? So IF we carry our ancestors in our guts, then shouldn’t we be able to connect to our ancestors at any time…by just listening…to our guts?

Of course ! Let me tell you how this is possible…And what it means for our spiritual and physical health. Here I offer a different perspective on “Soul retrieval”. A potential bridge between modern science and mysticism…

Let’s say that each of those little micro-dudes carries a fragment of our soul-self, and within that individual fragment is a piece of the “bigger picture”, a piece of the Great Mystery. Each microbe plays a role in commandeering these bio-suits we call “bodies”, to think, feel and act in certain ways. And yes, just like humans, these bacteria each have wisdom, agendas, and tendencies. Some critters like candida have a tendency to be opportunistic and reckless reproducers. They rape and pillage the terrain in an attempt to spread and conquer, despite the damage to the greater organism. Much like the white man has historically done to the indigenous brown cultures 😉

Reflecting on the above parallel has brought me to the idea that these so-called “beneficial bacteria” that have often been trampled upon by candida and other parasites, are VERY much like indigenous cultures that have been over-run by dominating/opportunistic cultures. They may not be as clever or driven to reproduce and dominate, but they are wiser, more connected to source and the lands where they dwell. They are more resourceful and they know how to live within their means, so as to not disturb the whole. They actually give back to the land and only take what they need to survive. They can survive disasters and famine, because they know how to live off the land without over-indulgent behaviors. These native bacteria, I call the “wise ones”, are the microscopic entities that connect us to the source of ancestral knowledge, because they have been with us from the beginning. The ones that came from the ancient soil also connect us to that soil, AND maybe they want us to return to the indigenous ways of living and remind us of our connection to a higher power. They are a part of a collective consciousness that is not competitive and exclusive, but cooperative and inclusive. Perhaps, they want us to create abundance, not exploit it. They break down our food and put nutrients back into our inner ecosystem, instead of robbing us of nutrients like parasites. Natasha Campbell-McBride refers to them as the little “house-keepers” of the gut because they clean up waste and use it for creating a fertile inner terrain.

So how does fasting fit into this story? Fasting has been touted for many benefits such as increased immune function, increased mental clarity, improved digestion and enhanced healing. This is because, when we fast, it’s similar to hitting a reset button on our inner ecosystem. The opportunistic micro-villains that are dependent on high-carb diets of processed fast-foods, start to die-off. And with them and their pollutants/toxins finally under control, we can actually hear the subtle voice of our ancestors once again. The “wise ones”, the symbionts that are resourceful, can adapt to the lack of “fast-food”, by “living off the land” so to speak. They can live through starvation because they’ve been there before, in previous life-times. In fact they are the common thread between human life-times. If you take one bacteria that exists in your gut right now, you could probably link it to your mother, and her mother, and her mother, and so on and so forth. That one bacteria has passed on her soul, her DNA and “wisdom” for millions of years. Through many periods of fasting, when food was scarce. She KNOWS how to surthrive and she carries with her, the wisdom of HOW to surthrive.

This “theory” is very supportive of how I actually FEEL when I fast. I have never felt SO connected to Spirit as I do when I fast, except for maybe when I was a little girl. Before my body was over-run by candida and parasites and before my gut was sterilized by anti-life pills (anti-biotics). I see now, why all the major religious sects practiced fasting as a way to connect to the Higher Power. And speaking of spiritual beliefs…many cultures still believe that ancestral spirits cause disease, how interesting is it that we have also come to the conclusion in our Western society that bacteria cause disease. Do you see the link? Bacteria ARE ancestral spirits!!! The soil IS…our Soul!

In order for us to maximize our potential, as individual spiritual beings and as a collective evolving consciousness, we need to think in terms of how we can shift our inner AND outer eco-systems, from competitive battle-zones to harmonious, self-regulating entities. Let’s start with the “inner” ecosystem, specifically the gut, which is where most of our bacteria reside. If you read the Wikipedia article on gut bacteria this is what you’ll find…”The human body, consisting of about 10 trillion cells, carries about ten times as many microorganisms in the human gut. It is estimated that these gut flora have around 100 times as many genes in aggregate as there are in the human genome.”
That’s a massive amount of genes controlling more than we can ever imagine. So, when our inner ecosystems are over-run by opportunistic micro-dudes, we OURSELVES take on an opportunistic way of being and living. We ALSO become reckless and overly concerned with mating and spreading our DNA regardless of the damage we are inflicting on the greater whole. We BECOME the parasites and the out-of-control candida.

This is why I strongly encourage intermittent fasting, for optimal spiritual and physical health. For the sake of the native micro-cultures, we MUST keep those rampaging, wasteful dominators in check! By cutting off their food source for just ONE day a week, you can start to recolonize your inner ecosystem with little indigenous beings. Ones that don’t just seek to PRO-CREATE, but also seek to CO-CREATE and co-evolve with you, symbiotically. By doing this regularly you will start to develop an inner collective wisdom, that will teach you how to thrive within your environment by downloading intelligence from the field that connects the past, present, and future generations. Think of fasting and eating live, bacteria covered foods as making an investment into our inner culture AND outer culture. AND by exploring these inner terrain modification techniques we are also learning to modify our outer terrains through practices like permaculture, where the primary focus is also on the microbial matter in the soil. We, ourselves, begin to SHIFT from opportunistic parasites to collaborative symbionts. We can stop supporting practices that “till and kill the soil/soul” and start building and giving back to it instead.

I believe the quickest way to “normalize” our inner ecosystem is through intermittent fasting, whether on liquid foods (like broths, fresh juices, herbal teas, fermented drinks, or spring water) or ideally through dry fasting. For some highly acidic individuals, initially re-inoculating with ancient bacteria through ingesting fermented foods can hasten the process of overthrowing the “inner dictators” and supporting the indigenous bacteria. Try it, and you’ll soon find that these “wise ones” seem to carry with them a memory for the feeling of “home.” By increasing serotonin and other feel-good bacteria production in the gut, we can enhance our mood and cognitive function to be more joyful and more conscious stewards of the land. And just as we want to create bio-diversity in our outer ecosystem, we also want to increase diversity in our inner ecosystem to ensure resiliency of the whole…and we can do this by ingesting bacteria on a variety of wild herbs, in-season fruits and veggies grown in your own food forest or by friends, and by breathing in healthy soil bacteria (like M. vaccae) throughout the day by working the soil or hiking in Nature.

So with all that being said…I no challenge you to join me, by doing what I call “flinging poop” (the beneficial microbes) far and wide, inside and outside to connect to the ancient wisdom of our ancestors, which is transmitted through us more easily when we engage in regular fasting…or by just cleaning up our diets. Let’s all guide each other to the source, to the soil, where life began as microscopic entities. A feeling and a place that we call “HOME”…where it all started.

Alohaaaaaahaaaahaaaa!
Pachee

written by TheGiftofSelf