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Montreux Jazz Festival Release More Than 50 Full Sets of Performances

During this unprecedented time, fans will have the chance to experience iconic performances by some of their favourite artists from their living rooms,” reads a press statement via NME, “including rare concerts from ‘The Godfather of Soul’ James Brown, who played Montreux Jazz Festival in 1981 and the legendary Nina Simone in 1976. Fans will also be able to enjoy Johnny Cash’s 1994 Live at Montreux performance, as well as the ground-breaking hip hop group RUN DMC’s electrifying show in 2001.”

“We hope that a little music and soul will brighten up your day!” the organizers continue.

Other released festival sets include Ray Charles, Nile Rodgers & Chic, and Phil Collins, as well as Wu-Tang Clan, Simply Red, Carlos Santana, and Deep Purple.

To access this treasure trove of concert videos, head to the Montreux Jazz’s official website. The festival, which is now in its 54th year, will communicate a new date for the 2020 lineup announcement soon.

In related news, Radiohead recently shared their full set from 2017’s Best Kept Secret Festival.

Read the full article at consequence of sound

What are Anti Nutrients?

Are anti-nutrients harmful?

broccoli growing in the ground

The takeaway: The pros and cons of anti-nutrients on long-term human health is an area of active research. Though certain foods may contain residual amounts of anti-nutrients after processing and cooking, the health benefits of eating these foods outweigh any potential negative nutritional effects. Eating a variety of nutritious foods daily and avoiding eating large amounts of a single food at one meal can help to offset minor losses in nutrient absorption caused by anti-nutrients.

The term “anti-nutrients” suggests what they are. Whereas nutrients are substances that nourish plants and animals to grow and live, anti-nutrients earn their title because they can block the absorption of nutrients. Anti-nutrients are naturally found in animals and many plant-based foods. In plants, they are compounds designed to protect from bacterial infections and being eaten by insects. [1]

There are several compounds in the foods we eat classified as anti-nutrients. Examples include:

  • Glucosinolates in cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage)—can prevent the absorption of iodine, which may then interfere with thyroid function and cause goiter. Those already with an iodine deficiency or a condition called hypothyroidism are most susceptible.
  • Lectins in legumes (beans, peanuts, soybeans), whole grains—can interfere with the absorption of calcium, iron, phosphorus, and zinc.
  • Oxalates in green leafy vegetables, tea—can bind to calcium and prevent it from being absorbed.
  • Phytates (phytic acid) in whole grains, seeds, legumes, some nuts—can decrease the absorption of ironzincmagnesium, and calcium. [2,3]
  • Saponins in legumes, whole grains—can interfere with normal nutrient absorption.
  • Tannins in tea, coffee, legumes—can decrease iron absorption.

It is not known how much nutrient loss occurs in our diets because of anti-nutrients, and the effects vary among individuals based on their metabolism and how the food is cooked and prepared. Many anti-nutrients like phytates, lectins, and glucosinolates can be removed or deactivated by soaking, sprouting, or boiling the food before eating.

Another consideration is that these anti-nutrients affect the absorption of nutrients eaten at the same meal. Therefore to lower this risk, it is recommended to avoid eating large quantities of foods containing anti-nutrients at one meal, and to eat a balanced diet throughout the day with a variety of foods. [3] For example, instead of eating two cups of bran cereal with milk for breakfast, choose one cup of cereal with milk and one cup of fresh berries.

People who are at high risk for diseases related to mineral deficiencies, such as osteoporosis with calcium deficiency or anemia with iron deficiency, may wish to monitor their food choices for anti-nutrient content. Another strategy could be to alter the timing of eating foods with anti-nutrients. Examples are to drink tea between meals instead of with a meal to reduce the chances of iron being poorly absorbed, or taking a calcium supplement a few hours after eating a high-fiber wheat bran cereal that contains phytates.

Studies on vegetarians who eat diets high in plant foods containing anti-nutrients do not generally show deficiencies in iron and zinc, so the body may be adapting to the presence of anti-nutrients by increasing the absorption of these minerals in the gut. [3]

Keep in mind that anti-nutrients may also exert health benefits. Phytates, for example, have been found to lower cholesterol, slow digestion, and prevent sharp rises in blood sugar. [2] Many anti-nutrients have antioxidant and anticancer actions, so avoiding them entirely is not recommended. [3,4]

Keeping an eye on glucosinolates

A few studies have found a small but significant increased risk of disease with higher intakes of glucosinolates, which are obtained mainly through cruciferous vegetables. In two studies following three large prospective cohorts of 42,170 male and 168,404 female health professionals for several years, a higher intake of glucosinolates was associated with a slightly higher risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes in men and women. Individuals with the highest intakes of glucosinolates had a 19% increased risk of type 2 diabetes compared with those with the lowest intakes, even after adjusting for other factors that can affect diabetes, such as BMI, physical activity, and smoking. [5] The strongest associations were observed for Brussels sprouts when comparing the highest (1 or more servings/week) and lowest intakes (never or almost never). In a separate analysis of these same three cohorts looking at intakes of glucosinolates and heart disease, participants who consumed one or more servings a week of Brussels sprouts and cabbage had a higher heart disease risk than those who consumed these vegetables less than once per month. [6] The authors did not recommend avoiding these foods but rather emphasized a need for more studies to replicate and confirm these findings to better understand this possible relation, as several other studies have shown a protective effect on diabetes and heart disease with higher intakes of cruciferous vegetables.

Book Select – The Laws of Human Nature

Robert Greene is a master guide for millions of readers, distilling ancient wisdom and philosophy into essential texts for seekers of power, understanding and mastery. Now he turns to the most important subject of all – understanding people’s drives and motivations, even when they are unconscious of them themselves.

We are social animals. Our very lives depend on our relationships with people. Knowing why people do what they do is the most important tool we can possess, without which our other talents can only take us so far. Drawing from the ideas and examples of Pericles, Queen Elizabeth I, Martin Luther King Jr, and many others, Greene teaches us how to detach ourselves from our own emotions and master self-control, how to develop the empathy that leads to insight, how to look behind people’s masks, and how to resist conformity to develop your singular sense of purpose. Whether at work, in relationships, or in shaping the world around you, The Laws of Human Nature offers brilliant tactics for success, self-improvement, and self-defense.

You can purchase the book on amazon or read the PDF here

Daily Focus 078

I think we all have that “If I knew moment” at one point or another.  Hindsight is always 2020.. see what i did there. Today we discuss the intricacies of thirst trapping. A good hunter keeps a few different types of traps. Ever discriminate against someones choice of food? Yeah that can be me at times. Shoutout to Myco_Dogon_West the package arrived safely and right on time. Still out in nature listening and thinking in the language the birds speak. Suppressing dreams with green? At times the dreaming world can feel more real then the waking. Sleep well

Quotes Of The Day

There is nothing safe about sex there never will be

In the midst of memories moist, I miss your voice

I came upon no wine as wonderful as thirst

Honorable Mention 

Myco_DOGON_West 

 

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For more information on the liberation pack go to his page follow and DM

16 Fast Growing Vegetables That Will Give You a Harvest Quickly

Would you like to grow a vegetable garden but feel like it just takes way too long? Well, the amazing thing is, it doesn’t have to.

Instead, you can plant some faster-growing veggies and have some great fresh food options to choose from.

So if this sounds great to you, then you’ll want to stay tuned to this post.

16 Fast Growing Vegetables:

Here are the faster vegetable options that you can grow in your garden:

1. Arugula

Arugula

Arugula is a wonderful little green that has a peppery flavor to it. We grew it at our old homestead. It was a delicious addition to our perennial garden.

If you’d like to have a peppery green to toss in your salad, then you should consider growing this flavorful vegetable. All you’ll need to do is plant it, give it about a month to produce mature leaves, and then cut them when you’re ready to enjoy.

Then they’ll continue to grow back each year for your enjoyment.

Arugula can be grown annually in nearly all zones and can be harvested after 30 days.

2. Spinach

Spinach

Spinach was one of the first things I ever tried growing. I did so because of how fast it grew and how simple it was to grow.

Basically, you directly sow the seeds into good quality dirt. Then you’ll need to water and wait. Before you know it, in about 4-6 weeks, you’ll have fresh spinach.

Spinach can be a nice addition to any salad, or you could prepare the spinach fresh like in this recipe.

Spinach can be grown in Zones 3-9, and the leaves can already be harvested 6 weeks after planting.

3. Baby Carrots

baby carrots

Baby carrots taste delicious, are a great snack, are great to cook with, and don’t take as long as full-sized carrots because they don’t have to grow to be as large.

So if you enjoy carrots and want them quickly, then you’ll definitely want to pick the baby carrot variety. Plant them in the ground, or in a container garden for versatility.

Either way, be sure to directly sow the seeds in quality dirt. Then in about 30 days, you’ll have your first harvest.

Baby carrots can be grown in zones 4-10 and can be ready within a month from sowing.

4. Radishes

Radish

Radishes are probably one of the fastest plants you can grow. They are also super simple to grow as well.

If you’d like to try and grow your own vegetables, radishes are excellent fast-growing vegetables to start with. You’ll directly sow these seeds in quality soil.

Radishes can be harvested in about 22-50 days and can be grown in zones 2-10.

5. Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Cucumbers are a very versatile plant to grow. You can make lots of delicious recipes with them. You can start with eating them fresh.

Then they could be a great addition to a salad. When you are “cucumbered out”, you can start making pickles with the fresh cucumbers.

But be advised that cucumbers like to run so you’ll need to either place them on a trellis or give them plenty of space to grow.

Cucumbers can be grown in zones 4-11 and if you want to make pickles the baby cucumbers can be harvested as early as 50 days after planting.

6. Beets

Beets

Beets are one of those vegetables that you either like or you don’t. But even if you don’t like the actual beet itself, you may enjoy the greens that come from the plant.

So either way, it is a great vegetable to grow if you’d like to have a harvest in a hurry. It is good to grow in the spring or when we are heading into fall because they can withstand a little heat, but don’t like the super-hot temperatures we often experience during summer.

Beets can be harvested in around 50 days, however, the greens can be harvested from 30 days. They grow well in zones 2-10.

7. Bush Beans

bush beans

Bush beans are my favorite kind of bean. They grow beautifully in the garden, they are easier to prepare when canning green beans, and they also produce a quicker harvest.

So if you love tender green beans, then consider planting a bush bean variety. All you’ll need to do is directly sow the seeds into quality dirt.

Then over time, with water and sunlight, they will produce a beautiful green bean bush.

Bush beans will be ready in around 40-65 days and grow well in zones 3-10.

8. Bok Choy

Bok Choy

Bok Choy is a fun plant. It looks fun, and it is even fun to say its name.

But it is also a great plant to grow because it can produce a mature harvest in around 30 days. If that isn’t a super-fast plant, I’m not sure what is.

If you are looking for something different to grow that will produce a fast harvest, then you should definitely consider Bok Choy.

Bok Choy grows well in zones 4-7 and individual leaves can be harvested after 21 days, or the whole head 45-60 days after planting.

9. Lettuce

Lettuce

Lettuce is such a versatile plant. There are so many different varieties to choose from that you can have a different flavor and crunch with each one.

But the great thing about lettuce is that it is hearty so it can grow in colder temperatures, and it also doesn’t take very long to produce a mature harvest.

If you want something healthy, green, and fast, then you should definitely consider planting lettuce.

Depending on the Lettuce variety, harvest can be about 30-60 days after planting, ideally in zones 4-9.

10. Summer Squash – Zucchini

zucchini-squash

Summer squash is probably one of my favorite vegetables to enjoy during the warmer months. It tastes delicious, is easy to grow, and produces quickly too.

So if you need to learn how to grow your own squash, here is a great resource to help you along the way.

But a quick overview is basically, you directly sow the seeds in quality soil, water them, and wait for them to grow and produce.

However, you’ll want to be sure to harvest your squash or zucchini when they are young for better flavor.

Zucchini, a Summer Squash variety, grows best in zones 3-10 and can be harvested almost daily from day 35 onwards as they grow so quickly.

Read the full article and get all the veggies at MorningChores 

Be Metaphysical: Changing Thought Patterns

Be metaphysical : Changing Thought

A meditation experience last night that furthered my steps along this path of thinking. What if words are slowing me down. Last night I began to bring attention to the pattern and sound of my heart beat. A few moments later I “realized” how little I pay attention to my heart. Possibly because of the vulnerability it takes to accept if this small heart stops its over. That feeling is a play of strength and delicateness. Following this line of thoughts I began to listen to the pulsing. A lecture played in the back ground giving my verbal train of thought something to juggle. If each thought process were a lane on a highway I found myself swerving between words, sound and image.

Through making instrumentals and becoming more musically expressive the past week it seems as if I’ve painted lines on the road splitting one lane into two. Where I would receive insight in the form of words now becomes replaced by a stream of percussion, string instruments, buzzing, birds you name it. Essentially words are sounds when you break it down. This lesson lingered on me for a few days and I was beginning to utilize the wisdom. 

While listening to the sound of my heartbeat allowing my thoughts to flow through the “percussion filter” the words trickled back in for a moment to explain the feeling I had even though the feeling was self explanatory in the instant it was felt.  The words that followed after seemed slow, late to the party. That was the feeling, knowing I don’t necessarily need words to gain an understanding. Most of what I’ve learned comes from reading or experience then explaining it through words to others or myself. In this moment I felt how words can limit the speed / pace of comprehension.

I’ll continue walking down the path of re arranging the form of language I’ve communicated to myself with my whole life.

19 Edible Plants Found In Nature

So you’re stranded in the wilderness. You consumed the last nub of your Clif Bar two days ago, and now you’re feeling famished. Civilization is still several days away, and you need to keep up your strength. The greenery all around you is looking more and more appetizing. But what to nibble on? Some plants will keep you alive and are chock full of essential vitamins and minerals, while some could make you violently ill….or even kill you.

Which of course makes proper identification absolutely critical.

Below we’ve given a primer on 19 common edible wild plants. Look them over and commit the plants to memory. If you’d like to discover even more edible wild plants, we suggest checking out the SAS Survival Handbook and the U.S. Army Survival Manual.

In the coming months, we’ll be publishing articles on edible wild roots, berries, and fungi. So stay tuned.

Plants to Avoid

If you can’t clearly identify a plant and you don’t know if it’s poisonous, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Steer clear from a plant if it has:

  • Milky or discolored sap
  • Spines, fine hairs, or thorns
  • Beans, bulbs, or seeds inside pods
  • Bitter or soapy taste
  • Dill, carrot, parsnip, or parsley-like foliage
  • “Almond” scent in the woody parts and leaves
  • Grain heads with pink, purplish, or black spurs
  • Three-leaved growth pattern

Many toxic plants will exhibit one or more of the above characteristics. Bear in mind that some of the plants we suggest below have some of these attributes, yet they’re still edible. The characteristics listed are just guidelines for when you’re not confident about what you’re dealing with. If you want to be completely sure that an unknown plant is edible, and you have a day or two to spare, you can always perform the Universal Edibility Test.

Amaranth (Amaranthus retroflexus and other species)

Amaranth Amaranthus retroflexus flower edible plants

Native to the Americas but found on most continents, amaranth is an edible weed. You can eat all parts of the plant, but be on the look out for spines that appear on some of the leaves. While not poisonous, amaranth leaves do contain oxalic acid and may contain large amounts of nitrates if grown in nitrate-rich soil. It’s recommended that you boil the leaves to remove the oxalic acid and nitrates. Don’t drink the water after you boil the plant. With that said, you can eat the plant raw if worse comes to worst.

Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis)

wild Asparagus bunch along dirt road edible plants

The vegetable that makes your pee smell funny grows in the wild in most of Europe and parts of North Africa, West Asia, and North America. Wild asparagus has a much thinner stalk than the grocery-store variety. It’s a great source of source of vitamin C, thiamine, potassium, and vitamin B6. Eat it raw or boil it like you would your asparagus at home.

Burdock (Arctium lappa)

Burdock Arctium lappa common edible plants

Medium to large-sized plant with big leaves and purplish thistle-like flower heads. The plant is native to the temperate areas of the Eastern Hemisphere; however, it has been naturalized in parts of the Western Hemisphere as well. Burdock is actually a popular food in Japan. You can eat the leaves and the peeled stalks of the plant either raw or boiled. The leaves have a bitter taste, so boiling them twice before eating is recommended to remove the bitterness. The root of the plant can also be peeled, boiled, and eaten.

Cattail (Typha)

Cattail Typha common edible plants in wild

Known as cattails or punks in North America and bullrush and reedmace in England, the typhagenus of plants is usually found near the edges of freshwater wetlands. Cattails were a staple in the diet of many Native American tribes. Most of a cattail is edible. You can boil or eat raw the rootstock, or rhizomes, of the plant. The rootstock is usually found underground. Make sure to wash off all the mud. The best part of the stem is near the bottom where the plant is mainly white. Either boil or eat the stem raw. Boil the leaves like you would spinach. The corn dog-looking female flower spike can be broken off and eaten like corn on the cob in the early summer when the plant is first developing. It actually has a corn-like taste to it.

Clovers (Trifolium)

Clovers Trifolium close up common edible plants in wild

Lucky you — clovers are actually edible. And they’re found just about everywhere there’s an open grassy area. You can spot them by their distinctive trefoil leaflets. You can eat clovers raw, but they taste better boiled.

Chicory (Cichorium intybus)

Chicory cichorium intybus in wild common edible plants

You’ll find chicory growing in Europe, North America, and Australia. It’s a bushy plant with small blue, lavender, and white flowers. You can eat the entire plant. Pluck off the young leaves and eat them raw or boil them. The chicory’s roots will become tasty after boiling. And you can pop the flowers in your mouth for a quick snack.

Chickweed (Stellaria media)

Chickweed Stellaria media in wild common edible plants

You’ll find this herb in temperate and arctic zones. The leaves are pretty hefty, and you’ll often find small white flowers on the plant. They usually appear between May and July. You can eat the leaves raw or boiled. They’re high in vitamins and minerals.

Curled Dock (Rumex crispus)

curled dock plant in wild common edible plants

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You can find curled dock in Europe, North America, South America, and Australia. It’s distinguished by a long, bright red stalk that can reach heights of three feet. You can eat the stalk raw or boiled. Just peel off the outer layers first. It’s recommend that you boil the leaves with several changes of water in order to remove its naturally bitter taste.

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

dandelion close up plant in wild common edible plants

Sure, it’s an obnoxious weed on your perfectly mowed lawn, but when you’re out in the wild this little plant can save your life. The entire plant is edible — roots, leaves, and flower. Eat the leaves while they’re still young; mature leaves taste bitter. If you do decide to eat the mature leaves, boil them first to remove their bitter taste. Boil the roots before eating as well. You can drink the water you boiled the roots in as a tea and use the flower as a garnish for your dandelion salad.

Field Pennycress (Thalspi vulgaris)

field pennycress plant in wild common edible plants

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Field pennycress is a weed found in most parts of the world. Its growing season is early spring to late winter. You can eat the seeds and leaves of field pennycress raw or boiled. The only caveat with field pennycress is not to eat it if it’s growing in contaminated soil. Pennycress is a hyperaccumulator of minerals, meaning it sucks up any and all minerals around it. General rule is don’t eat pennycress if it’s growing by the side of the road or is near a Superfund site.

Fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium)

fireweed plant in wild common edible plants

This pretty little plant is found primarily in the Northern Hemisphere. You can identify fireweed by its purple flower and the unique structure of the leaves’ veins; the veins are circular rather than terminating on the edges of the leaves. Several Native American tribes included fireweed in their diet. It’s best eaten young when the leaves are tender. Mature fireweed plants have tough and bitter tasting leaves. You can eat the stalk of the plant as well. The flowers and seeds have a peppery taste. Fireweed is a great source of vitamins A and C.

Green Seaweed (Ulva lactuca)

green seaweed plant in wild common edible plants

If you’re ever shipwrecked on a deserted island, fish the waters near the beach for some green seaweed. This stuff is found in oceans all over the world. After you pull green seaweed from the water, rinse with fresh water if available and let it dry. You can eat it raw or include it in a soup. Or if you’re particularly enterprising, catch a fish with your homemade spear and use the seaweed to make sushi rolls, sans rice.

Kelp (Alaria esculenta)

kelp plant in wild common edible plants

Kelp is another form of seaweed. You can find it in most parts of the world. Eat it raw or include it in a soup. Kelp is a great source of folate, vitamin K, and lignans.

Plantain (Plantago)

plantain plant in wild common edible plants

Found in all parts of the world, the plantain plant (not to be confused with the banana-like plantain) has been used for millennia by humans as a food and herbal remedy for all sorts of maladies. You can usually find plantains in wet areas like marshes and bogs, but they’ll also sprout up in alpine areas. The oval, ribbed, short-stemmed leaves tend to hug the ground. The leaves may grow up to about 6″ long and 4″ wide. It’s best to eat the leaves when they’re young. Like most plants, the leaves tend to get bitter tasting as they mature. Plantain is very high in vitamin A and calcium. It also provides a bit of vitamin C.

Read the full article at TheArtOfManliness

Very clean energy source: Thin Air

A microbial organism pulls electricity from water in the air

  •  Hidden in the mud along the banks of Washington D.C.’s Potomac River may be a profound new source of electricity.
  • The microbe makes nanowires that produce a charge from water vapor in ordinary air.
  • Already capable of powering small electronics, it appears that larger-scale power generation is within reach.

The mad rush is on for discovering clean and renewable forms of energy before it’s too late. Turns out, researchers may have unknowingly had it in hand for decades. It’s a sediment organism first found along the muddy shores of the Potomac River and reported in a letter to the journal Nature in 1987. It turns out the microbe produces electricity out of thin air, one resource we’re unlikely to run out of. University of Massachusetts Amherst scientists have just revealed their development of a device for harvesting this electricity in Nature.

The amazing microbe

Image source: Anna Klimes and Ernie Carbone, UMass Amherst/Wikipedia

The rod-shaped microbe, Geobacter sulfurreducens is, as its name implies, a member of the Geobacter genus, a group referred to as “electrigens” for their known ability to generate an electrical charge. It was UMass Amherst microbiologist Derek Lovley who found and wrote about the microbe in the late 80s.

It was also Lovlley’s lab that discovered the microbe has a talent for producing electrically conductive protein nanowires, and his lab recently developed a new Geobacter strain that could produce them more rapidly and inexpensively. “We turned E. coli into a protein nanowire factory,” Lovley says. What this means, he says, is that “With this new scalable process, protein nanowire supply will no longer be a bottleneck to developing these applications.”

Enter electrical engineer Jun Yao, also of UMass Amherst. His specialty had been engineering electronic devices using silicon nanowires. The two decided to work together to see if they could turn Geobacter’s protein nanowires into something useful.

Read the full article at BigThink

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Dictionary of Unusual Words

Words and language are at the core of our identity, they allow us to define ourselves, to share our stories, and they are essential to our ability to communicate with others.

This means that there are some words out there that are impossible to translate from one language to another, or describe incredibly particular feelings, objects, or states of mind.

So, without further ado, here’s a collection of some of the most unusual words we use.

metanoia

For more unusual words, click here.

Teenagers build robot to remove all 8.3b tons of plastics in every ocean

– 4 Teenagers from South Sudan have invented a robot to clean the world’s oceans of all its 8.3b plastic pollution – The team displayed their invention at the recently held First Global Challenge in Dubai – Reports indicate that over 300m tons of plastic waste is generated yearly in the world and a good amount ends up in the oceans Our Manifesto: This is what YEN.com.gh believes in 4 South Sudanese teenagers have built a robot to rid the world’s oceans of over 8.3bn tons of plastic pollution. According to Face2FaceAfrica.com, the team displayed their invention that can clean water bodies of plastics and other pollutants at the recently held First Global Challenge in Dubai.

The Global Challenge to recover “trash from the seas” using robots is an annual international robotics and artificial intelligence competition held for the first time in Dubai. READ ALSO: Married lady narrates how she cheated on her husband with another married woman Reports indicate that 300 million tons of plastic waste are generated every year. This figure is estimated to be nearly equivalent to the weight of the entire population. Research indicates that more than 8.3 billion tons have ended up in the ocean and if care is not taken there will be more plastic than fish in the ocean by 2050. The disturbing levels of the pollutant that come from human activities every year, kill marine life thereby affecting global populations.

According to team mentor Richard Ring, the robot can be used to clean the Nile of plastic pollution and the Nile is one of the 10 rivers contributing 90% of Ocean plastic waste. By extension, the robot can clean other rivers and oceans if the use is duplicated. How exactly the robot works to perform the job is not disclosed. It is thought that how it operates is considered a trade secret. Speaking about the groundbreaking invention, James Madut, one of the team members said: “As a youth, our main point is to unite and make a change and work with the community to clean the oceans. We can do it together”.

A  young SHS boy from Koforidua by name Kelvin Amaniampong has come up with an innovation that can save Free SHS policy ¢4m yearly Kelvin, from a humble background, who is in the double-track system realized how much time he has had to spend being unproductive and decided to provide a solution.

He came up with an app called Scrollbooks with the help of his uncle to provide free textbooks and past questions to millions of Ghanaian students nationwide.

Source : https://yen.com.gh/143839-teenagers-build-robot-remove-83b-tons-plastics-ocean-worldwide.html

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