Videos

100k+ Luxury Tree House

This luxurious treehouse complete with its own slide and open air tree shower is world’s away from your wooden childhood den. Hidden in a forest in West Dorset, the modern treehouse was built by London designer Guy Mallinson for the ultimate retreat for holidaymakers wanting to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city. The Woodsman’s Treehouse is a combination of sustainable craftsmanship and 5 star interiors including a sauna and hot tub on the upper deck, a revolving wood burner and even has something for those who want to really be at one with nature – an open air tree-shower. The treehouse has only been open to guests since the beginning of August 2016 but is already fully booked for the next few months, encouraging the designer to think about building a second tree house.

To book your stay at The Woodsman’s Treehouse or to join Guy on one of his woodworking courses, visit: http://www.mallinson.co.uk

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Shark Callers

The Sharkcallers of Kontu depicts the ancient tradition of ‘sharkcalling’ in the village of Kontu, on the remote west coast of New Ireland in Papua New Guinea. There are only a few men remaining who use magic to call, trap and kill sharks by hand from their small outrigger canoes. Making this very old and extraordinary practice the spine of the film, the filmmaker also weaves in a compelling portrait of the daily life of the villagers. The Sharkcallers of Kontu explores the changes to cultural values and traditional customs wrought by colonisation, alcohol, commerce and Christianity. The film is beautifully shot in an observational style and makes memorable use of archival stills and interviews with villagers. Filmmaker Dennis O’Rourke narrates.

Turning Skin Cells into Brain Cells ?

IN BRIEF
  • Researchers have developed a method to turn skin cells into pluripotent stem cells which are then reprogrammed to become microglia cells.
  • These brain cells play a crucial role in the development of neurological diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease. Studying them could help scientists discover new treatments.

FROM SKIN TO BRAIN

The brain is one of the most vital organs in the human body, so damage to the brain from injury or aging can have major impacts on people’s quality of life. Neurological disorders represent some of today’s most devastating medical conditions that are also difficult to treat. Among these is Alzheimer’s disease.

Usually, research involving Alzheimer’s rely on brain cells from mice. Now, neurobiologists from the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have developed a method that could allow the use of human cells instead of animal ones to help understand neurological diseases better.

In their study, which was published in the journal Neuron, the researchers found a way to transform human skin cells into stem cells and program them into microglial cells. The latter make up about 10 to 15 percent of the brain and are involved in the removing dead cells and debris, as well as managing inflammation. Micgrolia are instramental in neural network development and maintenance, explained researcher Mathew Blurton Jones, from UCI’s Department of Neurobiology & Behavior.

“Microglia play an important role in Alzheimer’s and other diseases of the central nervous system. Recent research has revealed that newly discovered Alzheimer’s-risk genes influence microglia behavior,” Jones said in an interview for a UCI press release. “Using these cells, we can understand the biology of these genes and test potential new therapies.”

A RENEWABLE METHOD

The skin cells had been donated by patients from UCI’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center. These were first subjected to a genetic process to convert them into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells — adult cells modified to behave as an embryonic stem cell, allowing them to become other kinds of cells. These iPS cells were then exposed to differentiation factors designed to imitate the environment of developing microglia, which transformed them into the brain cells.

“This discovery provides a powerful new approach to better model human disease and develop new therapies,” said UCI MIND associate researcher Wayne Poon in the press release. The researchers, in effect, have developed “a renewable and high-throughput method for understanding the role of inflammation in Alzheimer’s disease using human cells,” according to researcher Edsel Abud in the same source.

Visual Periodic Table Break down

Thanks to high school, we’ve all got a pretty good idea about what’s on the periodic table.

But whether you’re looking at something common like calcium, iron, and carbon, or something more obscure like krypton and antimony, how well do you know their functions? Could you name just one practical application for vanadium or ruthenium?

Lucky for us, Keith Enevoldsen from elements.wlonk.com has come up with this awesome periodic table that gives you at least one example for every single element (except for those weird superheavy elements that don’t actually exist in nature).

There’s thulium for laser eye surgery, cerium for lighter flints, and krypton for flashlights. You’ve got strontium for fireworks, and xenon for high-intensity lamps inside lighthouses.

Oh and that very patriotic element, americium? We use that in smoke detectors.

We’ve included a sneak-peak below, but for the real interactive experience, click here to try it out.

period-1Keith Enevoldsen

You can also download the PDF if you’ve got a class to teach, or maybe you just want to be great and put it on your bathroom door.

And if this whole exercise has made you realise just how rusty you’ve become with your science basics, check out AsapSCIENCE’s Periodic Table Song below.

We’d like to see a better way of memorising the periodic table – it’s even got the four brand new elements that earned a permanent spot in the seventh row back in January (which unfortunately have no cool uses outside of atomic research).

Check it out:

 

H/T SPLOID

Source – ScienceAlert

Cloud House

CLOUD HOUSE is a unique rain harvesting system that creatively reuses the rainwater it collects to provide a deeper look into the natural systems that give us the food we eat. It is a sensory experience that amplifies the connection between our existence and the natural world.

PRESS RELEASE – drive.google.com/file/d/0B-T3JvWIFb1WQVZ4ZE9ld3V1RDA/view

On rainy days, a gutter system collects rain that hits the roof and directs it to a storage tank underneath the house. Sitting in the rocking chairs triggers a pump that brings the collected rainwater up into the ‘cloud’ to drop onto the roof, producing that warm pleasant sound of rain on a tin roof. At the same time, rainwater drops from the tops of the windows onto the edible plants growing in the windowsills.
Designed to collect and store rainwater for the ‘cloud’ to rain, this display of the water cycle illustrates our dependence on the fragile natural systems that grow the food we eat: at points throughout the year when there is low rainfall, the ‘cloud’ will not rain on the roof because it is simply out of water.

CLOUD HOUSE is clad with barn wood and tin reclaimed from a nearby abandoned farm by a group of Amish builders. With rocking chairs on a barn wood floor, the sound of rain on a tin roof, and rain drops bringing the necessary elements for plants growing in the window sills, the look and feel of CLOUD HOUSE are the epitome of a rural farm experience from simpler times and offer a space to reflect on the natural processes of food production.

Located at Springfield, MO’s largest farmers’ market, CLOUD HOUSE is a poetic countterpoint to the busy market, inviting visitors to a meditative space in which they can slow down, enjoy the fresh edible plants, and listen to rain on a tin roof.

“For years, grocery stores have provided food that relies on large agro-conglomerates with unsustainable farming practices, international food distributors, and chemical companies. Many people have demanded that we have another relationship with our food that focuses on personal health, the health of the planet, and supporting local community. Farmer’s markets, like the one at Farmers Park, give the option to know by whom and how our food is made. However, the changing climate has brought a new threat of increased instability to our food systems by creating unpredictable weather patterns, which we are seeing as more drought in some locations and more floods in other locations. This makes it harder and harder to grow food. It is becoming increasingly important that we have a clear understanding of how closely we are tied to ecological systems like the water cycle. CLOUD HOUSE offers a moment to sit in a rocking chair and listen to the rain on the tin roof to reflect upon the fragile dance we are in with nature and our own survival.”

PROJECT TEAM
Matt O’Reilly at Green Circle Projects – Developer | Patricia Lea Watts – Project Manager | Jeff Broekhoven – Artistic Advising | Sujin Lim – Cloud Design | Ben Jennings -Structural Engineer | Sue Evans and Kenny Underwood at Elemoose – Cloud Construction | Omar Galal and John Walker at Rain Reserve -Water System | Aaron Sampson at SamCo Construction LLC – Barn Wood Siding and Tin Roof Steve | Wilson at Wilson Creek Rustic Furniture – ootings/Piers | Richard Thompson at CHR Metals – Steel Framing | Bryan Simmons at A Cut Above – Landscaping Jeff Shelton Outdoor Lawn Service, Gravel | Pam Bachus at Picky Sisters, Rocking Chairs and Table | Tim Hawley – Photography

High-Res and Low-Res Images of CLOUD HOUSE: timhawley.com/160412_CloudHouse.zip

For More of Matthew Mazzotta’s work — matthewmazzotta.com/home.html

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The Best Video Production and Informative Health Platform

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